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Climate change impacts on livelihood of resource-dependent residents

The Government of Botswana has formulated regulations that try to protect the environment and the atmosphere. However, these regulations do protect the environment while at the same time compromise and affect the resource-dependent communities.

A master’s thesis written by Tiro Nkemelang at University of Cape Town in 2018 suggests that the extent to which extremes and their impacts are to change due to additional 0.5 degrees warming increments at regional level as the global climate system warms from current levels to 1.5 degrees and then 2.0 degrees above pre-industrial levels need to be understood to allow for better preparedness and informed policy formation.

Dr Mangaliso Gondwe, a senior Research fellow at Okavango Research institute explained that Botswana in general is highly vulnerable to climate change mainly because the country sits in a semi-arid environment experiencing high temperatures and low rainfall. “Consequently , almost all economic sectors have been affected by climate change however, the most vulnerable sectors are those sectors such as agriculture, water and biodiversity and ecosystems because they are climate dependent and these sectors generally exist in all areas across the country although the intensity may vary,” he emphasized.

Dr Gondwe stated that increased variability in temperature, rainfall and increased frequency and severity of extreme events such as heat waves and droughts are due to climate change. “For instance increased temperature and changing rainfall patterns have increased water stress (in terms of water quality and quantity (i.e., water quality may become poor as quantity reduces), loss of rangeland productivity, and reduced agricultural yield” he said. He further stated that the losses in rangeland productivity and agricultural yield actually threaten food security. “We have seen droughts causing high mortalities of both wild animals and livestock, Wildlife mortalities and/or migrations can affect the nature-based tourism sector and consequently employment opportunities for many people,” he highlighted.

According to a research paper by David Thomas of the University of Oxford in United kingdom, academics suggests that by 2070, there will be an increase in dune activity at the Kalahari region which could have big impacts on goat farming communities . “Loss of vegetation could be disastrous for pastoral farmers whose livestock depend on plants for grazing,” the research insisted. It further indicated that research predicts that by 2040 the southern dunes of Botswana and Namibia will be activated.

A source that preferred anonymity, a lecturer of Geophysics indicated that there are still ways in which the government can do to protect both the environment and ensure there accessibility of natural resources to the community. He said for communities that still use firewood, the government can invest more on solar energy. “The government can just at least subsidize these solar panel, that way you are protecting the environment and also sustaining these people’s lives,” he said.

Katlarelo Sefatlhi, an MSc environmental sciences stream: Environmental pollution and remediation student at Botswana International University of science and Technology suggested that the government could invest in Wind energy in his words “where wind is used to generate mechanical power or electricity , that way he protects both the environment and give people the electricity,” he said.

Dr Gondwe said that Botswana is in the process of developing a very important policy document titled ‘climate change response Policy that will guide the country’s mitigation and adaptation measures to climate change. “I think the documents is still in draft phase, I think the measures are obvious from the policy’s vision and objective copied below” he said.

The vision of the policy states; Botswana strives to be a society that is sustainable, climate resilient, and whose development follows a low carbon development pathway, in pursuit of prosperity for all. Its objectives read: To mainstream sustainability and climate change into development planning and in so doing, enhance Botswana’s resilience and capacity to respond to existing and anticipated climate change impacts. The policy also promotes low carbon development pathways and approaches that significantly contribute to socio economic development, environmental protection, poverty eradication and reduction of Green-house-Gases (GHG) from the atmosphere.

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Why Katholo engaged private lawyers against State

16th May 2022
Katlholo

The Director General of the Directorate on Corruption and Economic Crime (DCEC) Tymon Katholo has revealed why he took a decision to engage private lawyers against the State. The DCEC boss engaged Monthe and Marumo Attorneys in his application to interdict the Directorate of Intelligence and Security (DIS) from accessing files and dockets in the custody of the corruption busting agency.

In his affidavit, Katholo says that by virtue of my appointment as the Director General of the DCEC, he is obliged to defend the administration and operational activities of the DCEC. He added that, “I have however been advised about a provision in the State Proceedings Act which grants the authority of public institution to undertake legal proceedings to the Attorney General.” Katholo contends that the provision is not absolute and the High Court may in the exercise of its original jurisdiction permit such, like in this circumstance authorise such proceedings to be instituted by the DCEC or its Director General.

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Dada to break Kwelagobe’s BDP long standing record

16th May 2022
Dada

Botswana Democratic Party (BDP) has gone through transformation over the years, with new faces coming and going, but some figures have become part and parcel of the furniture at Tsholetsa House. From founding in 1962, BDP has seen five leaders changing the baton during the party’s 60 years of existence. The party has successfully contested 12 general elections, albeit the outcome of the last polls were disputed in court.

While party splits were not synonymous with the BDP for the better part of its existence, the party suffered two splits in the last 12 years; the first in 2010 when a Barataphathi faction broke ranks to found the now defunct Botswana Movement for Democracy (BMD). The Barataphathi faction was in the main protesting the ill-treatment of then recently elected party secretary general, Gomolemo Motswaledi, who had been suspended ostensibly for challenging the authority of then president, Ian Khama.

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The Gulaam Husain Abdoola – Dubai sting detailed

16th May 2022
Gulaam Husain Abdoola

Mr Abdoola has known Mr. Uzair Razi for many years from the time he was a young boy. Uzair’s father, Mr Razi Ahmed, was the head of BCCI Bank in Botswana and “a very good man,” his close associates say.

Uzair and his wife went to settle in Dubai, the latter’s birthplace. He stayed in touch and was working for a real estate company owned by Mr. Sameer Lakhani. “Our understanding is that Uzair approached Mr. Abdoola to utilize their services for any property-related interests in Dubai. He did some work for Mr.Abdoola and others in the Botswana business community,” narrates a friend of Mr Abdoola.

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