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Sebego rejects Letshwiti

There is a tilt at the National Executive Committee (NEC) of Botswana Football Association (BFA) following Marshlow Motlogelwa’s sudden resignation as the 1st Vice President of the association. The vacancy has given Letshwiti an opportunity to cajole former BFA President, Tebogo Sebego to return to the BFA fold as Motlogelwa’s replacement.

Sources close to development, however, indicate that Sebego has declined the offer right away. WeekendSport has been informed that there has been a grand strategy to remove Motlogelwa and further appease all members who belonged to Sebego group with NEC posts.  The first deal was mooted last month when Mascom launched its charity cup initiative at Phakalane that Motlogelwa must step aside and an opportunity was presented to the Notwane president.

The move, according to sources close to developments, was meant to virtually coronate Letshwiti in his future football endeavors but for Sebego to have turned down the offer, it means the grand plan hit a snag.  However, it is said that Senki Sesenyi, an erstwhile ally of Sebogo, will be approached as an alternative, but that remains speculation until BFA makes the official announcement.

Sesenyi was part of Sebego’s troops and stood for the 2nd Vice President Post but narrowly lost to Masego Ntshingane. However, constitutionally, it means the same Ntshingane is elevated to the VP1 position. When approached for comment, Sebego at first laughed off the matter but would later say: “I do not think I can add value as VP1. I developed a football roadmap that is different from the current leadership and would want to impose our ideals on a moving train. I am happy with the progress that the BPL under Zac is making. My contribution at that board is valued.”
Sebego’s candidacy, it seems, is set to be a two-pronged assault on Letshwiti orchestrated by the ‘godfathers’ of football.

All the while, there is still belief that Sebego’s interest is at the uppermost. Certain embattled Friends of Football members — the football regime of which Sebego has represented and led — are believed to be ensuring that he will group high profile names to solidify his candidacy in running for the post again. Indeed, it will mean that the next year election will therefore likely be a straight fight between members of friends of football and the current president is prepared to face seemingly insurmountable odds, particularly after the regime itself split where one Setete Phuthego might as well be prepared to mount a serious campaign against his former immediate boss.

Both Phuthego and Motlogelwa are seen to have hold trust at the regions but having been dumped, it is really a difficult equation to solve. With the fall of Motlogelwa, the BFA leader is seen as without protection and will count on the men he never leant to trust in the past 6 years.
It is clear as a day that Sebego’s refusal into the NEC is expected to further complicate things for the current president Letshwiti who himself swept Sebego two years ago after an earnest and explosive strategy. Observes, however, still believe that Sebego could have taken the offer to smoothen things as efforts meant to heal football are given priority.

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Finally, sponsors jerk BFA

30th January 2023

With many being of the view that the state of football in Botswana has deteriorated significantly as it is no longer appealing to the business community, this was a good week for the football community. The Botswana Football Association (BFA) leadership under the stewardship of MacLean Letshwiti secured sponsorship for a combined value of P19. 3 million for the FA Cup competition and the First Division league – both South and North.

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Clubs petition Zackhem, Jagdish Shah

23rd January 2023

Some disgruntled Botswana Football League (BFL) shareholders are planning to petition the BFL board led by Gaborone United director and chief financier Nicolas Zackhem and his treasurer Jagdish Shah. Furthermore, they want to challenge the Botswana football Association (BFA) leadership over the deteriorating status of football in the country.

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P80 million windfall for BFA

9th January 2023

Botswana Football Association (BFA) is poised to benefit from FIFA’s forward development programme. The Association will receive over P80 million to be used during the course of the next four years, as the world football governing body is strengthens its commitment to building a stronger foundation and the growth of football.

The Forward 3.0 funds – to be accessed by all 54 CAF members for the next four years have seen an increase of USD 2 million compared to Forward 2.0 cycle and Forward 1.0 cycle when the programme was launched.

According to FIFA President Gianni Infantino, the third cycle of the programme will be launched this month and it will dedicate more financial resources than before to developing football nations as there is an overall increase of approximately 30% compared to Forward 2.0.

“It is vital that we are now strengthening our commitment to building a stronger foundation for the growth of football,” Infantino noted.

The 62 page report by FIFA-Forward-Development-Programme-Forward-3-0-regulations also reveals that for travel and equipment, each member association, subject to compliance with the regulations, will receive an additional USD 1 million to cover the cost of travel and accommodation for their national teams. It further states that the remaining funds may be used to cover the cost of travel and accommodation for domestic competitions organized by the member associations.

“A contribution of up to USD 200,000 for the four-year cycle (2023-2026) to cover the cost of any football equipment related to the training of players and organization of matches (e.g. full kits for the national teams, balls, mini goals, bibs, substitution boards and referees’ communication systems) for those member associations that are identified as needing the most assistance,” the report indicated.

FIFA President, Infantino and his team said the member association is identified as needing the most assistance, for the purpose of the contributions, where their annual revenues (excluding Forward Programme funds as well as funds from any other FIFA programme/ initiative) do not exceed USD 4 million as the figure shall be reflected in the latest annual statutory audit report submitted to the FIFA general secretariat within six months after the closing of the relevant financial year.

Nevertheless, the contributions for travel will be released in four equal installments of USD 250,000 each in January every year, whilst those for equipment will be released in four equal installments of USD 50,000 each in January every year provided that the member association has fulfilled the conditions.

For the specific projects – in the case of Botswana and Namibia – there is an ambition to host the AFCON 2027 and if the joint bid succeed, the two nations will need to build new stadium to meet the requirements of CAF as the Bid technical committee has alluded before; therefore the two associations could make an appeal for extra funds to FIFA.

The report further says where a member association uses funds allocated for specific projects to improve or build new football infrastructure for its direct benefit or for the benefit of another entity (e.g. regional associations or clubs), the member association shall also provide, as part of the supporting documents, the FIFA general secretariat with the relevant national land registry certificate or extract confirming that the member association or the other entity is the owner of the land or the agreements confirming the donation, transfer or other form of provision to, or use of land by the association.

When contacted for comment, local sports analyst, Jimmy George said; “Ours is more a lack of vision, than money to finance programs. Regrettably when you lack vision not even USD 8 million can bail you out. Its pity the funds might be used to pay for the past projects that have yielded very little success.”

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