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DIAMOND SLUMP: De Beers’ revenue down P27 billion in two years

In the 24 months period ended December 2020 De Beers Group, the world largest diamond producer by value has cumulatively lost over P27 billion from its revenue earned when gauged against 2018 figure of $6.1 billion.

According to official figures contained in the Anglo American yearend financial report released this week De Beers has suffered another massive decline in revue in 2020 following another huge slump in 2019.

THE 2019 DOWNTURN

In 2019 , total revenue dropped by 24% from $6.1 billion (approximately P61 billion) to $4.6 billion (approximately P46 billion) with rough diamond sales falling by 26% to $4.0 billion from $5.4 billion in 2018.This in local currency mirrored a whooping P15 billion decline in De Beers total revenue for the year 2019.

This was due to an 8% decrease in consolidated rough diamond sales volumes to 29.2 million carats from 31.7 million carats in 2018 and a 20% reduction in average realized price to $137/ct from $171/ct in 2018.  The reduction in realized price was driven by a 6% decline in the average rough price index and from a lower value mix of diamonds sold, in response to the weaker demand for higher value diamonds that year.

In response to the challenging midstream trading environment, De Beers offered increased supply flexibility to Sightholders and sold a lower value and volume of rough diamonds to the midstream, while increasing marketing expenditure to $178 million( over P1.8 billion from $166 million( over 1.6 billion) in 2018 to further drive consumer demand for diamond jewellery.

Underlying EBITDA decreased by 55% that year, to $558 million from $1,245 million in 2018 owing to lower sales volumes, a lower value sales mix which curtailed mining margins, and the lower rough price index which reduced margins in the trading business. This 2019 slump in De Beers’s revenue was due to a range of factors that created significant challenges for rough diamond demand during the year.

In late 2018, stock market volatility and US-China trade tensions resulted in lower than expected holiday retail sales, which led to higher than anticipated stock levels in the industry’s midstream at the start of 2019.

Throughout the course of 2019, the midstream inventory position was under further pressure due to the closure of some US ‘bricks and mortar’ retail outlets, an increase in online purchasing (where inventory levels are lower), and retailers increasing their stock held on consignment. Tighter financing also affected the midstream’s ability to hold stock, all of which resulted in lower demand for rough diamonds during the year 2019.

OVER P12 BILLION PULA DECLINE IN 2020

The year 2020 was another catastrophic year for De Beers Group and the entire global diamond industry. The lucrative business began the year on a high note with De Beers and Alrosa, both world’s leading producers, registering a significant upswing in rough diamond sales.

However that was short-lived as the COVID-19 pandemic which broke out of China in late 2019 spread across the world, halting international trade and restricting both movement of people and shipment of goods.

The onset of the Covid-19 pandemic, and measures taken by governments in response, had a profound impact on global diamond supply and demand. Much of the industry was temporarily unable to operate, with up to 90% of jewellery stores closed at the peak of lockdowns, first in China, then in Europe and the US.

Reduced demand from jewellery retailers due to store closures combined with the closure of diamond cutting and polishing factories in India from April to June, led to a substantial reduction in rough diamond purchases in the first six months of 2020.

In response, De Beers reduced production and offered significantly increased flexibility to customers. The gradual easing of restrictions across the globe led to improved trading conditions and an increase in demand throughout the supply chain in the second half of the year.

As a result of the difficult market conditions, lockdowns in India and associated flexibility offered to customers, De Beers total revenue decreased by 27% to $3.4 billion(around P34 billion) from $4.6 billion( over P46 billion) in 2019 with rough diamond sales falling by 30% to $2.8 billion from $4.0 billion in 2019.

Rough diamond sales volumes decreased by 27% to 21.4 million carats (2019: 29.2 million carats). The average realized price decreased by 3% to $133/ct (2019: $137/ct), with a 10% decline in the average rough index largely offset by an increased proportion of higher value rough sold in 2020, driven by midstream demand and inventory mix.

Rough diamond production decreased by 18% to 25.1 million carats (2019: 30.8 million carats) in response to lower demand due to the pandemic and the Covid–19-related shutdowns in southern Africa during the first half of the year.

In Botswana, where De Beers operates a 50-50 joint venture with Government , production decreased by 29% to 16.6 million carats (2019: 23.3 million carats), with volumes at Jwaneng reduced by 40% to 7.5 million carats (2019: 12.5 million carats), while production at Orapa decreased by 16% to 9.0 million carats (2019: 10.8 million carats).

This was largely due to a nationwide lockdown from 2 April to 18 May, and the planned treatment of lower grade material at both Jwaneng and Orapa, following their restart, as a production response to lower demand. Both mines substantially reconfigured their mining operations to preserve costs in light of the lower levels of production, thereby preserving the mining margin.

In Namibia, production decreased by 15% to 1.4 million carats (2019: 1.7 million carats), while next door in South Africa, production increased to 3.8 million carats (2019: 1.9 million carats). Across oceans In Canada, production decreased by 15% to 3.3 million carats (2019: 3.9 million carats) principally reflecting Victor reaching the end of its life in the first half of 2019. Gahcho Kué production decreased by 4% to 3.3 million carats (2019: 3.5 million carats) as a result of the implementation of Covid-19 workforce protection measures.

PROSPECTS ARE HOWEVER LOOKING GOOD

De Beers says recent consumer demand trends have been positive in key markets and industry inventories are in a healthier position, providing the potential for a continued recovery in rough diamond demand during 2021, subject to the ongoing impact of Covid-19.

The London headquartered diamond mining giant says consumer desirability for natural diamonds is set to remain high over the medium to long term despite the economic impact of the pandemic and increasing supply of lab-grown diamonds.

De Beers says in the longer term, the impact of Covid-19 has accelerated the transformation that was already underway across the industry and which is expected to continue at pace. This includes more efficient inventory management, increased online purchasing, and a growing consumer desire for products with demonstrable ethical and sustainability credentials, including an enhanced appreciation for the natural world.

The long term outlook for the sector remains positive as De Beers continues to focus on its business transformation to support the continued growth of its own business and the wider diamond value chain.  For 2021, production guidance is 32–34 million carats, subject to trading conditions, the extent of further Covid-19related disruptions and ongoing operational challenges.

The higher production is driven by an expected increase in ore and improved grade performance at both Jwaneng and Venetia. Unit cost guidance is c. $55/ct, reflecting the increase in production volumes and the benefits of the restructuring undertaken in 2020.

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China’s GDP expands 3% in 2022 despite various pressures

2nd February 2023
China’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) expanded by 3% year-on-year to 121.02 trillion yuan ($17.93 trillion) in 2022 despite being mired in various growth pressures, according to data from the National Bureau Statistics.

The annual growth rate beat a median economist forecast of 2.8% as polled by Reuters. The country’s fourth-quarter GDP growth of 2.9% also surpassed expectations for a 1.8% increase.

In 2022, the Chinese economy encountered more difficulties and challenges than was expected amid a complex domestic and international situation. However, NBS said economic growth stabilized after various measures were taken to shore up growth.

Industrial output rose 3.6% in 2022 over the previous year, while retail sales slightly shrank by 0.2% data show that fixed-asset investment increased 5.1% over 2021, with a 9.1% hike in manufacturing investment but a 10% fall in property investment.

China created 12.06 million new jobs in urban regions throughout the year, surpassing its annual target of 11 million, and officials have stressed the importance of continuing an employment-first policy in 2023.

Meanwhile, China tourism market is a step closer to robust recovery. Tourism operators are in high spirits because the market saw a good chance of a robust recovery during the Spring Festival holiday amid relaxed COVID-19 travel policies.

On January 27, the last day of the seven-day break, the Ministry of Culture and Tourism published an encouraging performance report of the tourism market. It said that domestic destinations and attractions received 308 million visits, up 23.1% year-on-year. The number is roughly 88.6% of that in 2019, they year before the pandemic hit.

According to the report, tourism-related revenue generated during the seven-day period was about 375.8 billion yuan ($55.41 billion), a year-on-year rise of 30%. The revenue was about 73% of that in 2019, the Ministry said.

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Jewellery manufacturing plant to create over 100 jobs

30th January 2023

The state of the art jewellery manufacturing plant that has been set up by international diamond and cutting company, KGK Diamonds Botswana will create over 100 jobs, of which 89 percent will be localized.

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Business

Investors inject capital into Tsodilo Resources Company

25th January 2023

Local diamond and metal exploration company Tsodilo Resources Limited has negotiated a non-brokered private placement of 2,200, 914 units of the company at a price per unit of 0.20 US Dollars, which will provide gross proceeds to the company in the amount of C$440, 188. 20.

According to a statement from the group, proceeds from the private placement will be used for the betterment of the Xaudum iron formation project in Botswana and general corporate purposes.

The statement says every unit of the company will consist of a common share in the capital of the company and one Common Share purchase warrant of the company.

Each warrant will enable a holder to make a single purchase for the period of 24 months at an amount of $0.20. As per regularity requirements, the group indicates that the common shares and warrants will be subject to a four month plus a day hold period from date of closure.

Tsodilo is exempt from the formal valuation and minority shareholder approval requirements. This is for the reason that the fair market value of the private placement, insofar as it involves the director, is not more than 25% of the company’s market capitalization.

Tsodilo Resources Limited is an international diamond and metals exploration company engaged in the search for economic diamond and metal deposits at its Bosoto Limited and Gcwihaba Resources projects in Botswana.  The company has a 100% stake in Bosoto which holds the BK16 kimberlite project in the Orapa Kimberlite Field (OKF) in Botswana.

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