Connect with us
Advertisement

FIFPro urges players to end contracts if mistreated

Football players of various leagues within the African continent, including Botswana, have been given a new lease of life by the International Federation of Professional Footballers (FIFPro), in conjunction with Footballers Union Botswana (FUB) to demand their dues from their clubs within specified parameters.

Following the unprecedented disruption caused by COVID-19 at all levels of football, FifPro has worked on a series of recommendations and guidelines to address some of the key practical issues arising from the pandemic, especially with regard to player contracts and the transfer system generally.

A new ruling by the Federation of International Football (FIFA) a global football governing body, which took close to 18 months to be addressed, agrees that players who are owed salaries by their clubs, or mistreated anyhow be allowed to break their contracts.

These players will then be able to seek compensation after breaking their contracts. As a punishment, it is further indicated that clubs that refuse to pay players will be banned from taking part in selling, loaning and buying of players as the transfer window is extended.

The rule comes to effect in the midst of the corona virus pandemic that has left football with a bleak future. However, FIFA together Footballers Union note that a lot of work still has to be done for African players to finally walk to the gates of justice. It is indicated that in many cases, football players plying their trade in Africa either have no work contracts let alone copies of the documents.

A survey carried out by football union bodies within Africa under the theme; Global Employment Report, indicates that there are over 40% of players who reported cases of overdue payments.

In Gabon alone, a country that has twice hosted the African soccer piece (AFCON) has recorded the highest incidence of delayed pay in the world. The percentage stands at 96% followed unbelievably by Tunisia with 94%. Botswana has recorded 41% thus far while South Africa recorded low cases with 25%. Ghana comes last with 23%.

It is further observed that these players often times chose to remain playing despite dire conditions as they harbour dreams of snatching a contract with Europeans clubs or where conditions are better to finally start earning big monies. This is the case because local clubs often play a key role in transfers by issuing required paper work.

The COVID-19 pandemic has clearly had a major impact on the revenues of clubs, not least since matches cannot be played. Football, like other sectors of the economy, has to find fair and equitable solutions tailored to these circumstances, hopefully with a view to protecting jobs and achieving a fair and reasonable balance of interests between players and clubs.

Accordingly, FIFPro strongly encourages clubs and players to work together to find agreements and solutions during the period when football is suspended.

While it is primarily up to the relevant parties at national level to find solutions to fit the circumstances in their own country, FIFA recommends looking at all aspects of each situation in an even handed manner, including what government measures there are to support clubs and players, whether pay should be deferred or reduced and what insurance coverage may exist.

Continue Reading

Sport

Finally, sponsors jerk BFA

30th January 2023

With many being of the view that the state of football in Botswana has deteriorated significantly as it is no longer appealing to the business community, this was a good week for the football community. The Botswana Football Association (BFA) leadership under the stewardship of MacLean Letshwiti secured sponsorship for a combined value of P19. 3 million for the FA Cup competition and the First Division league – both South and North.

This content is locked

Login To Unlock The Content!

Continue Reading

Sport

Clubs petition Zackhem, Jagdish Shah

23rd January 2023

Some disgruntled Botswana Football League (BFL) shareholders are planning to petition the BFL board led by Gaborone United director and chief financier Nicolas Zackhem and his treasurer Jagdish Shah. Furthermore, they want to challenge the Botswana football Association (BFA) leadership over the deteriorating status of football in the country.

This content is locked

Login To Unlock The Content!

Continue Reading

Sport

P80 million windfall for BFA

9th January 2023

Botswana Football Association (BFA) is poised to benefit from FIFA’s forward development programme. The Association will receive over P80 million to be used during the course of the next four years, as the world football governing body is strengthens its commitment to building a stronger foundation and the growth of football.

The Forward 3.0 funds – to be accessed by all 54 CAF members for the next four years have seen an increase of USD 2 million compared to Forward 2.0 cycle and Forward 1.0 cycle when the programme was launched.

According to FIFA President Gianni Infantino, the third cycle of the programme will be launched this month and it will dedicate more financial resources than before to developing football nations as there is an overall increase of approximately 30% compared to Forward 2.0.

“It is vital that we are now strengthening our commitment to building a stronger foundation for the growth of football,” Infantino noted.

The 62 page report by FIFA-Forward-Development-Programme-Forward-3-0-regulations also reveals that for travel and equipment, each member association, subject to compliance with the regulations, will receive an additional USD 1 million to cover the cost of travel and accommodation for their national teams. It further states that the remaining funds may be used to cover the cost of travel and accommodation for domestic competitions organized by the member associations.

“A contribution of up to USD 200,000 for the four-year cycle (2023-2026) to cover the cost of any football equipment related to the training of players and organization of matches (e.g. full kits for the national teams, balls, mini goals, bibs, substitution boards and referees’ communication systems) for those member associations that are identified as needing the most assistance,” the report indicated.

FIFA President, Infantino and his team said the member association is identified as needing the most assistance, for the purpose of the contributions, where their annual revenues (excluding Forward Programme funds as well as funds from any other FIFA programme/ initiative) do not exceed USD 4 million as the figure shall be reflected in the latest annual statutory audit report submitted to the FIFA general secretariat within six months after the closing of the relevant financial year.

Nevertheless, the contributions for travel will be released in four equal installments of USD 250,000 each in January every year, whilst those for equipment will be released in four equal installments of USD 50,000 each in January every year provided that the member association has fulfilled the conditions.

For the specific projects – in the case of Botswana and Namibia – there is an ambition to host the AFCON 2027 and if the joint bid succeed, the two nations will need to build new stadium to meet the requirements of CAF as the Bid technical committee has alluded before; therefore the two associations could make an appeal for extra funds to FIFA.

The report further says where a member association uses funds allocated for specific projects to improve or build new football infrastructure for its direct benefit or for the benefit of another entity (e.g. regional associations or clubs), the member association shall also provide, as part of the supporting documents, the FIFA general secretariat with the relevant national land registry certificate or extract confirming that the member association or the other entity is the owner of the land or the agreements confirming the donation, transfer or other form of provision to, or use of land by the association.

When contacted for comment, local sports analyst, Jimmy George said; “Ours is more a lack of vision, than money to finance programs. Regrettably when you lack vision not even USD 8 million can bail you out. Its pity the funds might be used to pay for the past projects that have yielded very little success.”

Continue Reading