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The Babylonian Captivity Ploy

Benson C Sail
THIS EARTH, MY BROTHER

Nebuchadnezzar has the Jews exiled to his own domain to wreck Jerusalem’s prospects of hosting  King Anu

Circa 4000 BC, when Nibiru King Anu, “Our Father Who Art In Heaven”, concluded his visit to Earth and was now bidding farewell to his seniormost children Jehovah-Enlil, Ninmah, and Enki (a step-son), this is what he said as per Zechariah Sitchin’s The Lost Book of Enki: “Whatever Destiny for the Earth and the Earthlings intended, let it so be! If Man, not Anunnaki, to inherit the Earth is destined, let us destiny help. Give Mankind knowledge, up to a measure secrets of heaven and Earth them teach, Laws of justice and righteousness teach them, then depart and leave!”

It was onward from 4000 BC, during the astrological Age of Taurus, that the Sumerian civilisation, a giant leap in mankind’s knowledge horizons,  blossomed  and so Anu’s wish was fulfilled.   As such, the next time Nibiru showed up, Anu was certain to order the Anunnaki’s evacuation of Earth as their mission of civilising mankind will have been complete.    

Nibiru was expected to re-appear at the very turn of the  6th century BC. Just around  that time, word began to circulate among Anunnaki circles that the arrival into the ecliptic of planet Nibiru was close at hand but KING ANU WAS UNLIKELY TO SHOW UP; INSTEAD, HE HAD WIRED ORDERS TO THE EFFECT THAT ENLIL, ENKI, AND THE REST OF THE ANUNNAKI PREPARE TO LEAVE EARTH.  Thus it was that in 605 BC, Ishkur-Adad instructed the prophet Hosea to begin to prophesy about Nibiru so as to alert mankind to the possible perils its proximity to Earth might wreak on the planet.

Marduk and his son Nabu, however, took the news that Anu might not pitch with a grain of salt.   To them, it was a ploy on the part of the Enlilites to have Marduk caught off-guard when the King arrived and therefore irreparably scandalise him. As far as Babylonia (where Marduk was based) was concerned,  preparations for Anu’s arrival would proceed regardless. Marduk  was the only god with a vested interest in Earth as he had been banned from ever  returning to Nibiru for marrying an Earthling woman. Both his first wife Sarpanit I and his second wife Sarpanit II were demigods, that is, part Earthling and part Anunnaki. IN GENERAL, HOWEVER, THE GODS (AS THE ANUNNAKI WERE REFERRED TO) BEGAN TO DEPART EARTH AT THIS JUNCTURE.  

NEBUCHADNEZZAR TAKES THE REINS

In order to see to the stability of the Neo-Babylonian Empire, which he had founded in 625 BC after trouncing his Assyrian overlords into oblivion, Nabupolassar was aware he could not do that singlehandedly: he needed the embrace and co-operation of the Persians, then known as Medes. It were the Medes in point of fact who had made his defeat of the Assyrians possible when they allied with him. In a bid to secure the Medo-Babylonian alliance, Nabupolassar had his eldest son Nebuchadnezzar marry the daughter of the King of the Medes.

Now, with the return of Nibiru just around the corner, the race to control the space-related sites became even more frantic. Until now, the Egyptians had been of the same accord with Babylon in resisting Assyrian rule. Now they decided it was time they ceased and desisted from playing second fiddle to the Babylonians and set about charting their own hegemonic destiny. This was the resolve of Pharaoh Necho II, who came to power in 610 BC.

Necho wanted both Jerusalem and Baalbek to be in Egyptian hands by the time King Anu arrived, not in Babylon’s or any other nation for that matter. If he were to achieve these ends, he needed allies: that’s how he roped in the Assyrians despite the fact that they were already a spent force and all they could muster was the last kick of a dying horse.

In 609 BC, the Egyptian forces were on their way to reinforce the Assyrians in their desperate endeavours to stand up to Babylon when they were intercepted by King Josiah of Judah, who had allied himself with Babylon, at Megiddo. Sadly, Josiah’s forces were routed and Josiah himself was killed. The Egyptians pushed ahead, managed to cross the river Euphrates, and took control of Baalbek. In 605 BC, they advanced to Carchemish on the frontier between today’s Turkey and Syria, where they were now poised to capture Harran. 

At the time, an aged Nabupolassar was terminally ill and so he mandated his son Nebuchadnezzar, who was about 30 years of age, to head the Babylonian army and tackle the Egyptians. In June that same year, Nebuchadnezzar confronted the Egyptians at Carchemish and gave them a very good drubbing.  He pursued them all the way to the Sinai Peninsula, thus liberating “the sacred forest (Baalbek) in Lebanon which Nabu and Marduk desired”. He relentlessly chased after the Egyptians and retreated only after he received news of the death of his father in August that same year, whereupon he rushed back to Babylon to be crowned as the new King of Babylonia the following month.

However, Necho still had Judah in his sphere of influence. Josiah was succeeded by the younger of his two older sons Jehoahaz, who declared Judah’s independence from Egypt. The freedom was short-lived as Necho deposed Jehoahaz after he had reigned for a mere three months and replaced him with the rightful heir Jehoiakim but who was given strict instructions that he was under obligation to toe the Egyptian line through thick and thin. Jehoahaz was taken prisoner to Egypt, where he saw his last days. Would Nebuchadnezzar simply fold his arms whilst Necho held the all-important Judah in custody?

NEBUCHADNEZZAR READIES BABYLON FOR KING ANU

On the day he was being sworn in as the new King of Babylonia, Nebuchadnezzar intoned thus for the attention of the god Marduk:  “O merciful Marduk, may the house that I have built endure forever, may I be satiated with its splendour, attain old age therein, with abundant offspring, and receive therein tribute of the kings of all regions, from all mankind.” Much of what he entreated his god came to pass as Babylon became the most powerful city-state in the region and Nebuchadnezzar himself the greatest warrior-king and ruler in the known world.

By 600 BC, Babylon was so aglitter it was regarded as the centre of the world. Indeed, a contemporary clay tablet, which is on display in the British Museum, presents the ancient world as revolving around Babylon. “I have made the city of Babylon to be the foremost among all the countries and every habitation; its name I elevated to be the most praised of all the sacred cities,” Nebuchadnezzar wrote in his inscriptions.

Nebuchadnezzar ascended to the throne at a most momentous point in time – when the Return (of the planet Nibiru) was just around the corner. So to him, practically every action he took had to take this phenomenon into account. It was a time period “marked by decisive actions and fast moves, for there was no time to lose —the nearing Return was now Babylon’s prize!”

Nebuchadnezzar   had decided that King Anu was to be hosted not in Jerusalem but in Babylon. Babylon was to replace Jerusalem as the new “Navel of the Earth”, the Duranki in Sumerian, meaning “The Principal Link between Heaven (Nibiru mainly but the ecliptic in general) and Earth”. As such, massive renovation and construction works were to be undertaken in the great city and on the double. Marduk’s temple-abode, a seven-stage ziggurat, the Esagila, was renovated and rebuilt and renamed the  Etemen-Anki, meaning “The Temple of the Foundation for Heaven-Earth” to accord with its new role as the Navel of the Earth. It was equipped as an astronomical observatory from which to monitor, primarily, the approaching Nibiru – exactly the same thing that was done in Uruk when Anu’s visit to Earth was imminent circa 4000 BC. 

A new processional way leading to the Sacred Precinct for Anu’s holy feet to tread upon and a magnificent gate to usher through the great god were constructed. The iconic, glimmering blue gate was named the Ishtar Gate, after Inanna-Ishtar, who served as King Anu’s sexual hostess every time he came to Earth.  A reconstruction of the Ishtar Gate (see accompanying image) can be seen in the Pergamon Museum in Berlin.

NEBUCHADNEZZAR SEIZES JERUSALEM

If Babylon was to be the undisputed Navel of the Earth, it was imperative that Nebuchadnezzar neutralise Jerusalem; otherwise, there would be two geopolitically eminent centres of power contending for King Anu’s attentions when he turned up on the planet. Nebuchadnezzar had his sights set on Jerusalem from the very day he was crowned King in 605 BC and even as the coronation was in progress in Babylon, he gave orders for a detachment of his army that had trounced the Egyptians and was still in the Canaanite region to besiege Jerusalem. The army did that without encountering much resistance. The reigning King of Judah, Jehoiakim, agreed to the status of a vassal king,   albeit it reluctantly so. 

The Babylonian army ransacked the Temple of some of its golden articles and took them to Babylon. Some members of the royal family were also taken along, plus the leading lights of the Jewish intelligentsia, the latter of whom included the famous Daniel, Meshack, Abednego and Ezekiel.  The event marked the first of a series of deportations that were to follow. 

By December 604 BC, a number of local states in Syria and Canaan had pledged their subjection to Babylonian rule after Nebuchadnezzar had taken control of the Philistine Plain. The Babylonian Empire would in time stretch from the Persian Gulf on the south, through the ancient rivers of Tigris and Euphrates in the middle, and ending to the west with Syria and Palestine.

Meanwhile, the Egyptian Pharaoh Necho had regrouped after his drubbing by Nebuchadnezzar in 605 BC and had been rebuilding his arsenal and honing his battle field prowess. It paid off, for when his forces faced off again with the Babylonians on the borders of Egypt in 601 BC, the seemingly invincible Nebuchadnezzar was defeated and forced to retreat. Buoyed by this development, Jehoiakim, plus several other Babylonian vassal states in the region,  rebelled and declared independence against the advice of the prophet Jeremiah. 

It took three years for Nebuchadnezzar to recover from this setback and to be in a position where he was reinvigorated enough to launch a renewed assault to regain control. His immediate target as expected was the critically important Judah. In December 598 BC, he had Jerusalem surrounded. The siege,  during which Jehoiakim was killed, apparently by Jewish dissidents who abhorred his daring against Babylonia, and replaced with his son Jeconiah, lasted for three months  and with Necho’s assistance, which Jehoiakim had counted upon, not forthcoming,  the city surrendered in March 597 BC. Jehoiakim’s youthful uncle Zedekiah was installed as the vassal King.

Jeconiah, his mother, and  his captains were deported to Babylon. “All the princes, and all the mighty men of valour, ten thousand captives, and all the craftsmen and smiths; none remained, save the poorest sort of the people of the land,”  the Bible documents in 2 KINGS 24:14.  This was the Second Deportation.

NEBUCHADNEZZAR DESTROYS TEMPLE, DEPOPULATES  JERUSALEM

In 590 BC, King Zedekiah decided he would  no longer be the puppet of Babylon. Just like Nebuchadnezzar, he wanted to be in full and unmitigated control of the Holy City in the event King Anu pitched up. But he  was under no illusion he could throw off the yoke of Babylon singlehandedly. So in the fourth year of his reign he – once again against the advice of the far-sighted Jeremiah – joined a coalition that was being formed by Edom, Moab, Ammon, Tyre, and Sidon in rebellion against Nebuchadnezzar.

Upon getting  wind of the rumours of these machinations,  Nebuchadnezzar summoned Zedekiah to Babylon to administer to him a warn and caution statement but it seemed he took no heed. The following year, Nebuchadnezzar decided to pounce: he captured all the cities of Judah except three, one of which was Jerusalem and which he proceeded to  besiege for the third time.

Finding himself in dire straits, Zedekiah made an alliance with Pharoah Apries of Egypt and indeed the latter rushed to reinforce him. In the ensuing lull in hostilities, Nebuchadnezzar pulled a stunt by lifting the siege and Apries withdrew. No sooner had Apries done so than Nebuchadnezzar hemmed in on Jerusalem once again: Zedekiah was on  his own. Jerusalem was under siege from January 587 to  July 586 BC. The following are the circumstances and aftermath  of the siege according to one chronicler:

“Conditions in the city became increasingly desperate. Although the people had had time to prepare, their food supplies eventually began to run out. Cannibalism became a grim reality. Despite Jeremiah's counsel to surrender the king refused to do so and just as the last of the food in the city was exhausted the Babylonians broke through the wall. “Zedekiah fled with remains of his army, but was overtaken and captured near Jericho. From there he was brought before Nebuchadnezzar at his field headquarters at Riblah,  his sons were executed in front of him and he was blinded. From there he was taken in chains to Babylon. The key members of his cabinet were executed before Nebuchadnezzar at Riblah shortly afterwards.

“A large part of the population of Jerusalem was put to the sword and everything of value plundered. The bronze articles from the Temple were cut up and removed and the building together with the palace and the important houses were set on fire. “In order to ensure that the city would never rebel against him again, Nebuzaradan, the commander of the Imperial Guard, ordered that the walls be demolished. All who survived in the city were carried off into exile in Babylon, with the exception of the very poor of the land.

The starving population exchanged whatever riches they had left for food, its leadership and priesthood were gone and the Temple burnt. The Babylonians soldiers oppressed the survivors and forced them to work for their food.” The remnant of poor people that were spared were meant to serve as farmers and wine dressers.  These people had previously been landless peasants and presented the least risk to the Babylonians, but were required to work the land to prevent the fields falling into disuse.

WOULD KING ANU CONDONE NEBUCHADNEZZAR’S ACT?

Nebuchadnezzar was not the first King to deport a people from their own country. The pace was actually set by the Assyrian King Adad Nirari I (c. 1307-1275 BC), who thought the best way to prevent any future uprising was to remove the former occupants of the land and replace them with Assyrians. But Nebuchadnezzar had an ulterior motive for the deportations, which only the “Illuminati” of the day were privy to.  

HE WANTED TO MAKE JERUSALEM DESOLATE AND DECREPIT SO THAT WHEN KING ANU ARRIVED, HE WOULD AVOID IT LIKE THE PLAGUE AND INSTEAD FOCUS ON THE GLITTERING BABYLON.  His aim was to kill off entirely the competition posed by Jerusalem. Says Zechariah Sitchin: “The expectation, it seems, was that the arriving god (Anu)  of the Winged Disk (symbol for planet Nibiru) would come down at the Landing Place (Baalbek) in Lebanon, then consummate the Return by entering Babylon through the new marvelous Processional Way and imposing Ishtar Gate.”  

But in the event that he indeed pitched, would the pro-Enlilite Anu take kindly to being deflected to a city (Babylon) other than Jerusalem when it had been specifically designated for his ultimate hosting on the planet by virtue of its geometrical centrality? 

Having taken over Nippur’s prediluvial role to serve as Mission Control Center after the Deluge, Jerusalem was located at the center of concentric distances to the other space-related sites. Aptly calling it the “Navel of the Earth” (EZEKIEL 38:12), the Prophet Ezekiel had announced that Jerusalem has been chosen for this role by God himself. 

“Thus has said the Lord Yahweh: ‘This is Jerusalem; in the midst of the nations I placed her, and all the lands are in a circle round about her,” EZEKIEL 5:5. “Determined to usurp that role for Babylon,” Sitchin further notes, “Nebuchadnezzar led his troops to the elusive prize and in 598 BC captured Jerusalem.” How would King Anu take this seeming sacrilege in the event that he pitched?

NEXT WEEK:  HAIL THE PLANET OF THE GODS!

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The Daring Dozen at Bari

8th December 2020
JEFF---Batswana-smoke-unit

Seventy-seven years ago, on the evening of December 2, 1943, the Germans launched a surprise air raid on allied shipping in the Italian port of Bari, which was then the key supply centre for the British 8th army’s advance in Italy.

The attack was spearheaded by 105 Junkers JU88 bombers under the overall command of the infamous Air Marshal Wolfram von Richthofen (who had initially achieved international notoriety during the Spanish Civil War for his aerial bombardment of Guernica). In a little over an hour the German aircraft succeeded in sinking 28 transport and cargo ships, while further inflicting massive damage to the harbour’s facilities, resulting in the port being effectively put out of action for two months.

Over two thousand ground personnel were killed during the raid, with the release of a secret supply of mustard gas aboard one of the destroyed ships contributing to the death toll, as well as subsequent military and civilian casualties. The extent of the later is a controversy due to the fact that the American and British governments subsequently covered up the presence of the gas for decades.

At least five Batswana were killed and seven critically wounded during the raid, with one of the wounded being miraculously rescued floating unconscious out to sea with a head wound. He had been given up for dead when he returned to his unit fourteen days later. The fatalities and casualties all occurred when the enemy hit an ammunition ship adjacent to where 24 Batswana members of the African Pioneer Corps (APC) 1979 Smoke Company where posted.

Thereafter, the dozen surviving members of the unit distinguished themselves for their efficiency in putting up and maintaining smokescreens in their sector, which was credited with saving additional shipping. For his personal heroism in rallying his men following the initial explosions Company Corporal Chitu Bakombi was awarded the British Empire Medal, while his superior officer, Lieutenant N.F. Moor was later given an M.B.E.

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A Strong Marriage Bond Needs Two

8th December 2020

Remember: bricks and cement are used to build a house, but mutual love, respect and companionship are used to build a HOME. And amongst His signs is this: He creates for you mates out of your own kind, so that you may find contentment (Sukoon) with them, and He engenders love and tenderness between you; in this behold, there are signs (messages) indeed for people who reflect and think (Quran 30:21).

This verse talks about contentment; this implies companionship, of their being together, sharing together, supporting one another and creating a home of peace. This verse also talks about love between them; this love is both physical and emotional. For love to exist it must be built on the foundation of a mutually supportive relationship guided by respect and tenderness. As the Quran says; ‘they are like garments for you, and you are garments for them (Quran 2:187)’. That means spouses should provide each other with comfort, intimacy and protection just as clothing protects, warms and dignifies the body.

In Islam marriage is considered an ‘ibaadah’, (an act of pleasing Allah) because it is about a commitment made to each other, that is built on mutual love, interdependence, integrity, trust, respect, companionship and harmony towards each other. It is about building of a home on an Islamic foundation in which peace and tranquillity reigns wherein your offspring are raised in an atmosphere conducive to a moral and upright upbringing so that when we all stand before Him (Allah) on that Promised Day, He will be pleased with them all.

Most marriages start out with great hopes and rosy dreams; spouses are truly committed to making their marriages work. However, as the pressures of life mount, many marriages change over time and it is quite common for some of them to run into problems and start to flounder as the reality of living with a spouse that does not meet with one’s pre-conceived ‘expectations’. However, with hard work and dedication, couples can keep their marriages strong and enjoyable. How is it done? What does it take to create a long-lasting, satisfying marriage?

Below are some of the points that have been taken from a marriage guidance article I read recently and adapted for this purposes.

POSITIVITY
Spouses should have far more positive than negative interactions. If there is too much negativity — criticizing, demanding, name-calling, holding grudges, etc. — the relationship will suffer. However, if there is never any negativity, it probably means that frustrations and grievances are not getting ‘air time’ and unresolved tension is accumulating inside one or both partners waiting to ‘explode’ one day.

“Let not some men among you laugh at others: it may be that the (latter) are better than the (former): nor let some women laugh at others: it may be that the (latter) are better than the (former): nor defame nor be sarcastic to each other, nor call each other by (offensive) nicknames.” (49:11)

We all have our individual faults though we may not see them nor want to admit to them but we will easily identify them in others. The key is balance between the two extremes and being supportive of one another. To foster positivity in a marriage that help make them stable and happy, being affectionate, truly listening to each other, taking joy in each other’s achievements and being playful are just a few examples of positive interactions.
Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) said: “The believers who show the most perfect faith are those who have the best character and the best of you are those who are best to their wives”

UNDERSTANDING

Another characteristic of happy marriages is empathy; understanding your spouses’ perspective by putting oneself in his or her shoes. By showing that understanding and identifying with your spouse is important for relationship satisfaction. Spouses are more likely to feel good about their marriage and if their partner expresses empathy towards them. Husbands and wives are more content in their relationships when they feel that their partners understand their thoughts and feelings.

Successful married couples grow with each other; it simply isn’t wise to put any person in charge of your happiness. You must be happy with yourself before anyone else can be.  You are responsible for your actions, your attitudes and your happiness. Your spouse just enhances those things in your life. Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) said: “Treat your women well and be kind to them for they are your partners and committed helpers.”

COMMITMENT

Successful marriages involve both spouses’ commitment to the relationship. The married couple should learn the art of compromise and this usually takes years. The largest parts of compromise are openness to the other’s point of view and good communication when differences arise.

When two people are truly dedicated to making their marriage work, despite the unavoidable challenges and obstacles that come, they are much more likely to have a relationship that lasts. Husbands and wives who only focus on themselves and their own desires are not as likely to find joy and satisfaction in their relationships.

ACCEPTANCE

Another basic need in a relationship is each partner wants to feel valued and respected. When people feel that their spouses truly accept them for who they are, they are usually more secure and confident in their relationships. Often, there is conflict in marriage because partners cannot accept the individual preferences of their spouses and try to demand change from one another. When one person tries to force change from another, he or she is usually met with resistance.

However, change is much more likely to occur when spouses respect differences and accept each other unconditionally. Basic acceptance is vital to a happy marriage. Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) said: “It is the generous (in character) who is good to women, and it is the wicked who insults them.”
“Overlook (any human faults) with gracious forgiveness.” (Quran 15:85)

COMPASSION, MUTUAL LOVE AND RESPECT

Other important components of successful marriages are love, compassion and respect for each other. The fact is, as time passes and life becomes increasingly complicated, the marriage is often stressed and suffers as a result. A happy and successful marriage is based on equality. When one or the other dominates strongly, intimacy is replaced by fear of displeasing.

It is all too easy for spouses to lose touch with each other and neglect the love and romance that once came so easily. It is vital that husbands and wives continue to cultivate love and respect for each other throughout their lives. If they do, it is highly likely that their relationships will remain happy and satisfying. Move beyond the fantasy and unrealistic expectations and realize that marriage is about making a conscious choice to love and care for your spouse-even when you do not feel like it.

Seldom can one love someone for whom we have no respect. This also means that we have to learn to overlook and forgive the mistakes of one’s partner. In other words write the good about your partner in stone and the bad in dust, so that when the wind comes it blows away the bad and only the good remains.

Paramount of all, marriage must be based on the teachings of the Noble Qur’an and the teachings and guidance of our Prophet Muhammad (PBUH). To grow spiritually in your marriage requires that you learn to be less selfish and more loving, even during times of conflict. A marriage needs love, support, tolerance, honesty, respect, humility, realistic expectations and a sense of humour to be successful.

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Chronic Joblessness: How to Help Curtail it

30th November 2020
Motswana woman

The past week or two has been a mixed grill of briefs in so far as the national employment picture is concerned. BDC just injected a further P64 million in Kromberg & Schubert, the automotive cable manufacturer and exporter, to help keep it afloat in the face of the COVID-19-engendered global economic apocalypse. The financial lifeline, which follows an earlier P36 million way back in 2017, hopefully guarantees the jobs of 2500, maybe for another year or two.

It was also reported that a bulb manufacturing company, which is two years old and is youth-led, is making waves in Selibe Phikwe. Called Bulb Word, it is the only bulb manufacturing operation in Botswana and employs 60 people. The figure is not insignificant in a town that had 5000 jobs offloaded in one fell swoop when BCL closed shop in 2016 under seemingly contrived circumstances, so that as I write, two or three buyers have submitted bids to acquire and exhume it from its stage-managed grave.

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