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The God of Dark Arts

Benson C Saili
THIS EARTH, MY BROTHER

   
Ishkur-Adad, the Jehovah of the Exodus,  casts a stubborn spell  over Egyptian Pharaoh

What did Ishkur-Adad,  the Jehovah of the Exodus, mean when he referred to himself as  “EHYEH ASHER EHYEH”, this being the name by which Moses should  introduce him to the Hykso-Hebrews in Egypt, at the scene of the Burning Bush? Note  that Moses, who was a naturally assertive person like the great intellect he was, did not quiz Adad as to what he meant. Clearly, he  did comprehend the meaning of the name. Still, the Hebrews never used that name at all: instead, they generally referred to their god as ADONAI, or ATEN in Sumerian. Why this particular denomination we  shall unpack at the appropriate time.  

In the Bible’s multiple versions,   EHYEH ASHER EHYEH has been translated variously as “I am who am”;  "I am what I am"; or "I will be what I will be". In some versions, it is shortened simply to “I am”, or “Yahweh”.  Some scholars posit that what actually Adad said was, “Who am I? I am who I am, and never you mind”. In other words, Adad was telling Moses to mind his own business and not bother with what was a preposterous matter. That kind of response, however, is unseemly: a god who wants to sell himself to a people who pay allegiance to other gods cannot afford to be so dismissively impolitic. You don’t  win followers by coming across as vain, haughty,  and impudent.

Note that contrary to what the Bible would have you believe, this was not the first time the  Anunnaki employed the name Yahweh. Long before Moses came to Midian, the Midianites already had a god they called Yahweh, who was apparently their main god beside the goddess Ninmah, who was known as Hathor to the Egyptians. To the Egyptians, Midian  was known as “The Land of the Shasu of Yahweh”. 

This we learn from an inscription from the time of Pharaoh Amenhotep III, Moses’ father. “Shasu”, meaning a nomadic people, was the Egyptian term for Midianites, who like Hebrew-Hyksos were a Semitic people.  Thus Yahweh-Adad was already known in Midian for at least 70 years before Moses relocated there. Why did Moses’ personal encounter with Adad take up to 40 years to happen? It could have been that Moses was reluctant to embrace Enlilite gods, preferring, instead, to stick to venerating the Aten, the planet Nibiru. As a sort of puffed up person, he was very set  in his ways.  

So what did Adad exactly say to Moses? It was to tell his people that  “I AM WE ARE has sent me”.  That is to say, a collection of gods who he,  Adad, represented was the one that had commissioned Moses. In theosophy, the I AM WE ARE concept is known as the Sovereign Integral. Its meaning is simply that one is not an individual as such but a composite of constituent entities. Whatever he says or does represents the wishes of a collective of which he is part.

The  I AM, therefore, is the individual being directly interacting with an audience at that particular point in time. But as a representative, ultimately, of a larger banding, he is the I AM WE ARE. Adad was the I AM. But he along with his fellow Enlilites – Enlil, Nannar-Sin, and Utu-Shamash – comprised the I AM WE ARE. In other words, “God” was a plurality and not a single entity. “God” was the “Elohim”, the ruling pantheon of the Anunnaki,  and not simply “El”, an individual Anunnaki. The concept of multiple gods was not alien to the Hebrews. They were very much aware that their gods, the Anunnaki, were a clan. What was unusual was the idea of a single god representing several others. This would take a lot of convincing.

MOSES SACRIFICES HIS SON TO LUCIFERIAN FORCES

Once the proceedings at the scene of the Burning Bush were complete, it now fell to Moses to fulfill his part of the contractual bargain to recompense for the magical powers he had been endued by the forces of darkness.  When you sign a contract with the Devil, invariably in your own blood, you seal it by shedding another’s blood. This is not the blood of an ordinary person: it is the blood of somebody very dear to you.  This must be your child, wife, father, mother, brother, or sister in the main.  Your child or parent is the one who carries the most weight as you are invested with greater powers when you kill either of these.

In Anunnaki times,   one was required to sacrifice his firstborn son to either appease the gods (the basically diabolical Enlilites: not the generally benevolent Enkites) to bring about a desired result. THE MOST PRECIOUS SACRIFICE TO THE GODS WAS A KING’S FIRSTBORN SON. (In the “sacrificial death” of Jesus, an offspring of David, Israel’s greatest King,  and therefore the first century’s Davidic heir, we see this ethos at play.) 

For example, Abraham,  the father of the Hebrew nation, was asked to sacrifice his firstborn son Ishmael  by Adad though he defied the god and instead offered his second-born son Isaac (who was not his biological child), who Adad procedurally rejected.   Since Moses had been appointed by Ishkur-Adad as the King of the Hebrews, it was necessary that he sacrifice his firstborn son both on his own behalf and that of the Hebrew people.

A hotheaded Moses, however, was reluctant to sacrifice his own flesh and blood. He made that very clear to Adad and hastened away in a huff. As a descendant of  Abraham, Moses was all too aware  that Abraham had also taken very strong exception to sacrificing his own  son. But having fulfilled an initiation ritual,  Moses had already crossed the Rubicon and he was under obligation to do his part. As he made his way home, the demon that now indwelt him threatened that if he did not co-operate, he would be killed.  This is what is implied in EXODUS 4:24, which reads: “It came to be on the way, in the lodging, that a messenger of Yahweh encountered him and sought to put him to death.”

Moses finally acquiesced and did sacrifice his son with Zipporah. This son is not named but he was certainly his firstborn, meaning Gershom  and Eleazer were not the only sons he had with Zipporah: there must have been a firstborn who was sacrificed and that’s  the reason he is not named. LATER EDITORS OF  EXODUS, HOWEVER, DECIDED TO  GLOSS OVER THE SACRIFICE BY SPINNING IT AS NO MORE THAN A MERE  CIRCUMCISION OF HIS SON (EXODUS 4:25).

Maybe circumcision was indeed involved, but it must have been deliberately botched to result in the death of the child. The fact that Zipporah was the person who performed the circumcision (which is bizarre as women never are or were involved in the circumcision  process) clearly exposes the story as a fabricated one,  or at the very least attests to the contrived fatal result of the circumcision as indeed an innocent  woman forced to perform the act would make a mess of the process. It was only after the sacrifice was done that the demon desisted from badgering and barking threats at Moses (EXODUS 4:26).  
   
EGYPTIAN HYKSO-HEBREWS  SPURN MOSES

When Moses set course for Egypt this time around, he was accompanied by his first cousin Aaron. Moses was 80 going on 81, whilst Aaron was 83 going on 84.  Once again, the man they were going to meet was Pharaoh Ramesses I. This was Moses’ second encounter with Ramesses although the Pentateuch authors have fused the first and second mission into one as is often their hurried tendency.   The year was 1333 BC, Ramesses’ second year in office.

To his credit, Ramesses did not receive Moses hostilely. By this time, Ramesses was resigned to the fact that Moses, who had been the King of Median for about 40 years now, was his equal. In any case, Moses had renounced his Egyptian citizenship and so was no longer regarded as an aspiring Come-Back-Kid by the Egyptian establishment. He was thus received as a Hykso-Hebrew.    

Initially, all Moses asked for was to introduce himself to his people, the Hebrew-Hyksos, who were concentrated in the land of Goshen in northern Egypt.  Ramesses gave him the green light without much ado. Meanwhile, Ramesses had his troops at the ready just in case the Goshenites became excited at the sight of their leader and set about mischief-making of a provocative kind.  

Arriving at Goshen,  Moses did not address the entire Jewish population. He only picked a select few, who according to the Book of Exodus numbered 29 (EXODUS 6:14-24). Of course they must have been larger than that but the Exodus authors left out precious many names and retained only those whose descendants were prominent  at the time Exodus was written, that is, in the 6th century BC.

All the 29 names were the offspring of  Reuben, Simeon, and Levi – the first three sons of Jacob. But  the dominant ones numerically were members of the tribe of Levi, who numbered 20 in all. What that seems to suggest is that at this point in time, THE LEVITES WERE THE PRE-EMINENT JEWISH TRIBE. This is one  of two surprises, the other being the total absence  of  representatives  of the tribe of Judah, which had superseded that of Reuben, Simeon, and Levi, after the three patriarchs were cursed by Jacob (Reuben  for sleeping with one of his father’s younger wives; and Simeon and Levi for causing the expulsion of the Hykso-Hebrews from  Egypt after they  had  SeqenenreTao, southern Egypt’s black Pharaoh, murdered).   

How did the Levites, a cursed tribe, bounce back and become the leading tribe of the day during the Egyptian bondage? AARON HAD A LOT TO DO WITH THIS STATE OF AFFAIRS.   Remember, when Moses went into exile after being forced to step down as Pharaoh Akhenaten by the Egyptian army acting in concert with the Theban priesthood, Aaron not only took over as interim Pharaoh   but stayed in Egypt for another 40 years.

Aaron was therefore for a long time the elder statesman of the Hykso-Hebrews in Egypt and resultantly had enormous socio-political sway.  Aaron, if you recall, was the son of Joseph’s second-born son Ephraim (Aye to the Egyptians: also known by his titular name Amram in the Bible) and Tey, whose Hebrew name was  Yokarba (Jochebed in the English version of the Bible). Yokarba was of  the House of Levi, a Levite.

That makes Aaron a Levite essentially since one’s tribal identity was ordinarily traced through the mother.      Since Aaron was at once a Levite and patriarch of Egypt’s Hykso-Hebrews, he made sure that his tribe took  pride of place. THIS IS THE MAIN REASON  THE LEVITES BECAME ISRAEL’S PRIESTLY TRIBE AND WHY ONLY MEMBERS OF AARON’S CLAN  WERE ELIGIBLE FOR THE POSITION OF HIGH PRIEST. It was Aaron who masterminded and orchestrated their rehabilitation and restoration to “God’s” favour.

Why was the tribe of Judah now sidelined? Well, again if you recall, Judah was not meant to be the substantive leader of the Israelites (the nation Jacob, who was also known as Israel,  gave rise to): he was imply holding indefinite fort whilst Jacob’s anointed heir, Joseph,   was growing up. By the time of the exodus, Joseph not only had become a Hykso-Hebrew  legend but he had spawned at least three generations – Ephraim’s,  Aaron’s, and Nadab’s.   Thus Joseph had now reclaimed his rightful position as Jacob’s heir, meaning the tribe of Judah no longer counted.

Be that as it may, the tribe of Judah did not take their relegation to the fringes lying down. They did bounce back by and by, becoming the largest  and most powerful Jewish tribe. That, however, is another story, which we shall address at the appropriate time. Sadly for Moses, the Hykso-Hebrew elders were not persuaded to depart Egypt. One of the reasons given had to do with “hard service” (EXODUS  6:9).  In other words, they were  not prepared to  undergo the rigours of dislodging several nations that now inhabited Canaan.

It would entail several  years of  warfare and the Hykso-Hebrews of the day had never taken part in a war. Furthermore, the Hykso-Hebrew cast aspersions on the god Moses claimed to represent. What evidence was there that he would indeed see them to victory? How would they be assured that he was mighty enough to keep them safe and sound?   

BUT THE MAIN  REASON THE HYKSO-HEBREW ELDERS REJECTED MOSES’GOD HAD TO DO WITH THE FACT THAT HE DEMANDED THAT THEY SACRIFICE THEIR FIRSTBORN SONS IN RETURN FOR FREEING THEM FROM THE EGYPTIAN YOKE. In the Bible, this is not vividly  set out: it’s only when you read between the lines that you get the photo. But don’t you worry: we shall demonstrate to you soon how we were able to decipher that on the basis of collaborative extra-biblical sources.  

ISHKUR-ADAD “HARDENS PHARAOH’S HEART”

According to the Bible, Moses was able to contact Ishkur-Adad whilst he was in Egypt pleading the cause of his people. Exactly how the Pentateuch authors do not elaborate.  There was likely a secret rendezvous in the Egyptian wilds where he and Adad met considering that the Anunnaki gods had airborne vessels which could land on any terrain.

So when Moses, accompanied by Aaron, reported to Adad that his people had given him the middle finger, Adad instructed him to approach Ramesses and ask him to order an expulsion of the Hykso-Hebrews from Egypt. Adad told Moses point-blank that Ramesses would turn him down but only because he, Adad, would “harden his heart”. This would give Adad the opportunity to perform “miracles” that would help Moses convince the Hykso-Hebrews that Yahweh was a great god who indeed could do  wonders for them. 

“HARDENING THE PHARAOH’S HEART” IS NOT A MERE FIGURE OF SPEECH:   THIS IS THE FIRST DIRECT INDICATION WE HAVE OF AN ANUNNAKI GOD CONTRIVING TO INFLUENCE A HUMAN BEING BY MEANS OF HIGH-TECH MIND MANIPULATION. Mind control, which is a favourite Illuminati device even in our day, was not pioneered by Adolf Hitler’s Third Reich as we have been made to believe: it was introduced by the Anunnaki 3000 years ago, if not earlier.

Mind control is a  device whereby a person is mentally influenced to act according to the wishes of  his mind manipulator using sophisticated mind programming technology or harsh, heavy-handed mental access methods which make the victim easily susceptible to mental programming. For direct mass mental programming,  this can be achieved through mobile phone masts, smart metres, chemtrails,   broadcasting equipment, space satellites, vaccinations, foodstuffs such as GMOs, and the chemicals with which the water we drink either directly from  the dams or rivers,  or the mineral water that has become so fashionable today, is laced.

  At the individual level, mind programming can be administered by way of hypnosis or metaphysical devices, which a layman like you and I would term as witchcraft, black magic, or demon-possession (more on this subject in a future series). Moses was reluctant to follow through on Adad’s instruction and he made that clear to the god.  But Adad insisted that he just had to  as he was bound by the terms of the initiation he underwent at the scene of the Burning Bush and which obliged him to  obey Adad robotically.

Arriving at Ramesses’ courts, Moses accordingly delivered the message from “my God Yahweh”.  Yahweh, he said, had demanded that Ramesses “dismiss” the Hykso-Hebrews from Egypt so they retrace their way back to the legal land of their heritage, Canaan. Ramesses’ initial response was to scoff at Yahweh, who,  so he said, he  did not even know. Of course this was a deep blue lie: Ramesses  was aware that in the Land of the Midianites loomed large a god known as Yahweh.  Be that as it may, Ramesses decided to consult his team of advisors  on the matter.

Adad’s mind control stratagem was already at  work. The Pharaoh’s advisers were adamant that the Hykso-Hebrews must not be let go.  This is the reason they gave: “Behold, a nation, Children of Israel, is greater and mightier than us; Let us deal wisely with them, lest they multiply and, when war shall be called, they will join our enemies, and fight against us, and leave the land” –  EXODUS 1:9–10.

Let us put Egyptian anxieties in context. At the time, a powerful kingdom on the upper reaches of the Euphrates River had arisen. This Kingdom was called Mitanni (“The Weapon of Anu”) and belonged to a people known as the Hurrians.   Mitanni, an arch-enemy of Egypt, encompassed today’s Syria and Lebanon. In Mitanni was a region in the Khabu River area known as Aram-Naharayim, meaning “The Western Land of the Two Rivers”.  Mitanni’s principal urban centre was Harran, a bastion of the Hykso-Hebrews.

Harran’s main Hykso-Hebrew tribe were the Ben-Yamins – the descendents of Benjamin, Jacob’s youngest son. Benjamin was the only one of Jacob’s 12 sons who was a full brother to Joseph as the duo’s mother was Rachel (Rachel died after giving birth to Benjamin.) Both the mothers of Jacob (Rebecca) and Joseph came from Harran.

Now, if the Hykso-Hebrews were to be let go by Ramesses, their most obvious destination would be Harran – to rejoin their kith and kin.  Once the Hykso-Hebrews of Egypt reunited with the Hykso-Hebrews of  Harran, they would form Mitanni’s Fifth Column and reinforce the regular Mitannian army, thus making a doubly formidable force with which Egypt would have to contend. That was what Ramesses feared and that was why  he was dead set against giving Moses the green light to take his people with him.  
     

NEXT WEEK:   ISHKUR-ADAD’S TEN PLAGUES: WHERE THEY MIRACLES?

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Technology saves Lions from angry Okavango villagers

22nd November 2022

Villagers in the eastern Okavango region are now using an alert system which warns them when collared lions approach livestock areas. The new technology is now regarded as a panacea to the human/wildlife conflict in the area as it has reduced mass poisoning and killing of lions by farmers.

The technology is being implemented by an NGO, Community Living Among Wildlife Sustainably (CLAWS) within the five villages of Seronga, Gunutsoga, Eretsha, Beetsha and Gudigwa in the eastern part of the Okavango delta.

A Carnivore Ecologist from CLAWS, Dr Andrew Stein explained that around 2013, villagers in the eastern Okavango were having significant problems with losses of their cattle to predators specifically lions, so the villagers resorted to using poison and shooting the lions in order to reduce their numbers.

He highlighted that as a form of progressive intervention, they designed a programme to reduce the conflicts and promote coexistence. Another component of the programme is communal herding, introduced in 2018 to reduce the conflict by increasing efficiency whereby certified herders monitor livestock health and protect them from predators, allowing community members to engage in other livelihood activities knowing that their livestock are safe.

They are now two herds with 600 and 230 cattle respectively with plan to expand the programme to other neighbouring villages. Currently the programme is being piloted in Eretsha, one of the areas with most conflict incidences per year.

Dr Stein explained that they have developed the first of its kind alert system whereby when the lions get within three or five kilometers of a cattllepost or a homestead upon the five villages, then it will release an alert system going directly to the cellphones of individuals living within the affected area or community.

‘So, if a colored lion gets to about five kilometers of Eretsha village or any villagers in the Eretsha that has signed up for, the system will receive an SMS of the name of the lion and its distance to or from the village”, he stated. He added that this enables villagers to take preventative action to reduce conflicts before its starts.

Dr Stein noted that some respond by gathering their cattle and put them in a kraal or put them in an enclosure making sure that the enclosure is secure while some people will gather firewood and light small fires around edges of the kraal to prevent lions from coming closer and some when they receive the SMS they send their livestock to the neighbours alerting them about the presence of lions.

He noted that 125 people have signed to receive the alert system within Seronga, Eretsha, Beetsha, Gunutsoga and Gudigwa. He added that each homestead is about five people and this means more than 600 people immediately receive the messages about lions when they approach their villages. He also noted that last year they dispersed over 12 000 alerts, adding that this year is a bit higher as about 20 000 alerts have been sent so far across these villages.

Stein further noted that they have been significant changes in the behavior of the villagers as they are now tolerant to lions. “85 percent were happy with the SMS and people are becoming more tolerant with living with lions because they have more information to reduce the conflicts,” he stressed.

Stein noted that since the start of the programme in 2014 they have seen lion populations rebounds almost completely to a level before and they have not recorded cases of lion poisoning in the last three years which is commendable effort.

Monnaleso Sanga from Eretsha village applauded the programme by CLAWS noting that farmers in the area are benefiting through the alert system and take preventative measures to reduce human/lion conflict which has been persistent in the area. He added that numbers of cattle killed by lions have reduced immensely. He also admitted that they are now tolerant to lions and they no longer kill nor poison them.

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THE IDEAL QUALITY OF A MUSLIM

8th September 2022

A Muslim is supposed to be and should be a living example of the teachings of the Quran and the ‘Sunnah’ (the teachings and living examples of Prophet Muhammed (SAW – Peace be upon Him). We should follow these in all affairs, relations, and situations – starting with our relationship with our Lord, our own self, our family and the people around us. One of the distinguishing features of the (ideal) Muslim is his faith in Allah, and his conviction that whatever happens in the universe and whatever befalls him, only happens through the will and the decree of the Almighty Allah.

A Muslim should know and feel that he is in constant need of the help and support of Allah, no matter how much he may think he can do for himself. He has no choice in his life but to submit to the will of his Creator, worship Him, strive towards the Right Path and do good deeds. This will guide him to be righteous and upright in all his deeds, both in public and in private.

His attitude towards his body, mind and soul

The Muslim pays attention to his body’s physical, intellectual and spiritual needs. He takes good care of his body, promoting its good health and strength. He shouldn’t eat in excess; but he should eat enough to maintain his health and energy. Allah, The Exalted, Says “…Eat and drink; but waste not by excess, for Allah loves not the wasters.” [Quran 7: 31]

The Muslim should keep away from alcohol and drugs. He should also try to exercise regularly to maintain his physical fitness. The Muslim also keeps his body and clothes clean, he bathes frequently. The Prophet placed a great emphasis on cleanliness and bathing. A Muslim is also concerned with his clothing and appearance but in accordance with the Islamic ideal of moderation, avoiding the extremes.

As for his intellectual care, the Muslim should take care of his mind by pursuing beneficial knowledge. It is his responsibility to seek knowledge whether it is religious or secular, so he may understand the nature and the essence of things. Allah Says: “…and say: My Lord! Increase me in knowledge.” [Quran 20: 114

The Muslim should not forget that man is not only composed of a body and a mind, but that he also possesses a soul and a spirit. Therefore, the Muslim pays as much attention to his spiritual development as to his physical and intellectual development, in a balanced manner which ideally does not concentrate on one aspect to the detriment of others.

His attitude towards people

The Muslim must treat his parents with kindness and respect, compassion, politeness and deep gratitude. He recognizes their status and knows his duties towards them. Allah Says “And serve Allah. Ascribe nothing as partner unto Him. (Show) kindness unto parents…” [Quran 4: 36]

With his wife, the Muslim should exemplify good and kind treatment, intelligent handling, deep understanding of the nature and psychology of women, and proper fulfilment of his responsibilities and duties.

With his children, the Muslim is a parent who should understand his responsibility towards their good upbringing, showing them love and compassion, influence their Islamic development and giving them proper education, so that they become active and constructive elements in society, and a source of goodness for their parents, community, and society as a whole.

With his relatives, the Muslim maintains the ties of kinship and knows his duties towards them. He understands the high status given to relatives in Islam, which makes him keep in touch with them, no matter what the circumstances.

 

With his neighbours, the Muslim illustrates good treatment, kindness and consideration of others’ feelings and sensitivities. He turns a blind eye to his neighbour’s faults while taking care not to commit any such errors himself. The Muslim relationship with his wider circle of friends is based on love for the sake of Allah. He is loyal and does not betray them; he is sincere and does not cheat them; he is gentle, tolerant and forgiving; he is generous and he supplicates for them.

In his social relationships with all people, the Muslim should be well-mannered, modest and not arrogant. He should not envy others, fulfils his promises and is cheerful. He is patient and avoids slandering and uttering obscenities. He should not unjustly accuse others nor should he interfere in that which does not concern him. He refrains from gossiping, spreading slander and stirring up trouble – avoids false speech and suspicion. When he is entrusted with a secret, he keeps it. He respects his elders. He mixes with the best of people. He strives to reconcile between the Muslims. He visits the sick and attends funerals. He returns favours and is grateful for them. He calls others to Islam with wisdom, example and beautiful preaching. He should guide people to do good and always make things easy and not difficult.

The Muslim should be fair in his judgments, not a hypocrite, a sycophant or a show-off. He should not boast about his deeds and achievements. He should be straightforward and never devious or twisted, no matter the circumstances. He should be generous and not remind others of his gifts or favours. Wherever possible he relieves the burden of the debtor. He should be proud and not think of begging.

These are the standards by which the (ideal) Muslim is expected to structure his life on. Now how do I measure up and fit into all this? Can I honestly say that I really try to live by these ideals and principles; if not can I really call myself a true Muslim?

For the ease of writing this article I have made use of for want of a better word, the generic term ‘he’, ‘his’, ‘him’ and the ‘male’ gender, but it goes without saying that these standards apply equally to every female and male Muslim.

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OUR BELOVED CHILDREN

29th August 2022

“Homicide and suicide kill almost 7000 children every year; one in four of all children are born to unmarried mothers, many of whom are children themselves…..children’s potential lost to spirit crushing poverty….children’s hearts lost in divorce and custody battles….children’s lives lost to abuse and violence, our society lost to itself, as we fail our children.” “If you bungle raising your children, I don’t think whatever else you do matters very much.” (Quotation taken from a book written by Hillary Clinton).

These words may well apply to us here in Botswana; We are also experiencing a series of challenges in many spheres of development and endeavour but none as challenging as the long term effects of what is going to happen to our youth of today. One of the greatest challenges facing us as parents today is how to guide our youth to become the responsible adults that we wish them to be, tomorrow.

In Islam Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) has enjoined upon the parents to take care of the moral and religious instruction of their children from the very beginning, otherwise they will be called to account for negligence on the Day of Judgement. Parents must inculcate God-consciousness in their children from an early age, whereby the children will gain an understanding of duty to The Creator.

 

The Holy Qur’an says: ‘O you who believe! Save yourself and your families from the Fire of Hell’. (Ch. 66: V6). This verse places the responsibility on the shoulders of the parents to ensure that training and guidance begin at home. The goal is to mould the child into a solid Islamic personality, with good morals, strong Islamic principles, knowledge and behavior so as to be equipped to face the demands of life in a responsible and mature manner. This should begin with the proper environment at home that inculcates the best moral and behavioral standards.

But what do we have instead? Believers of all Religious persuasions will agree that we have children growing up without parental guidance, a stable home environment, without role models, being brought up in surroundings that are not conducive to proper upbringing and moulding of well-adjusted children. These children are being brought up devoid of any parental guidance and increasingly the desperate situation of orphaned children having to raise their siblings (children raising children) because their parents have succumbed to the scourge of AIDS.

It is becoming common that more and more girls still in their schooling years are now falling pregnant, most of them unwanted, with the attendant responsibilities and difficulties.

Observe the many young ladies who are with children barely in their teens having illegitimate children. In the recent past there was a campaign focused on the ‘girl-child’; this campaign targeted this group of young females who had fallen pregnant and were now mothers. The situation is that the mother still being just a ‘child’ and not even having tasted adulthood, now has the onerous responsibility of raising her own child most of the time on her own because either the father has simply disappeared, refuses to takes responsibility, or in some cases not even known.

We cannot place the entire blame on these young mothers; as parents and society as a whole stand accused because we have shirked our responsibilities and worse still we ourselves are poor role models. The virtual breakdown of the extended family system and of the family unit in many homes means that there are no longer those safe havens of peace and tranquility that we once knew. How then do we expect to raise well-adjusted children in this poisoned atmosphere?

Alcohol has become socially acceptable and is consumed by many of our youth and alarmingly they are now turning to drugs. Alcohol is becoming so acceptable that it is easily accessible even at home where some parents share drinks with their children or buying it for them. This is not confined only to low income families it is becoming prevalent amongst our youth across the board.

 

It is frightening to witness how our youth are being influenced by blatantly suggestive pop culture messages over television, music videos and other social media. Children who are not properly grounded in being able to make rational and informed decisions between what is right and what is wrong are easily swayed by this very powerful medium.

 

So what do we do as parents? We first have to lead by example; it is no longer the parental privilege to tell the child ‘do as I say not as I do’- that no longer works. The ball is in the court of every religious leader (not some of the charlatans who masquerade as religious leaders), true adherents and responsible parents. We cannot ignore the situation we have to take an active lead in guiding and moulding our youth for a better tomorrow.

In Islam Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) said: “No father gives a better gift to his children than good manners and good character.”  Children should be treated not as a burden, but a blessing and trust of Allah, and brought up with care and affection and taught proper responsibilities etiquettes and behaviour.

Even the Bible says; ‘Suffer the little children to come unto me and forbid them not, for of such is the kingdom of God. Verily I say unto you, whosoever shall not receive the kingdom of God as a little child, he shall not enter therein’. (Mark 10:14-15)

The message is clear and needs to be taken by all of us: Parents let us rise to the occasion – we owe it to our children and their future.

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