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Joseph Primed for Egypt

Benson C Saili
THIS EARTH, MY BROTHER

   
… as Enlilite strategy to repossess the strategically significant country is operationalised

For expelling the Hykso-Hebrews from Egypt and reuniting the country for the first time in 500 years, the Bantu Pharaoh Ahmose (whose name meant “Begotten of Ea”, Ea being an alternative name for Enki, the Anunnaki god of Africans) became a legend. He became the founder of Egypt’s 18th Dynasty, which ushered in a golden era of Egypt which lasted right through to about the end of the 14th century BC.  Simultaneously,   the 18th Dynasty marked the inception of the so-called New Kingdom.

The New Kingdom spanned the 18th, 19th, and 20th Dynasties of Egypt and was in force from the 16th to the 11th century BC.  Egypt was not only at the height of its economic success during this period but was also at the peak of its power militarily. Just how did Ahmose (and his late older brother Kamose, in whose steps he dutifully followed), who was only 20 years old when he took on  the Hyksos, manage to rout the Hyksos, who were so militarily strong they had turned southern Egypt into a vassal state?

Two reasons can be ventured.  First, the Hyksos were so cruel and callous in the way they treated the black Egyptians every black Egyptian was prepared to die just to be rid of them. The ancient Egyptian historian Manetho informs us that Hyksos made a habit of burning down  cities, destroying temples, and enslaving women and children just to flex muscles. It was not the Hebrews who were enslaved first in Egypt: it was  the  indigenous Egyptians who were first enslaved by the Hebrews, a settler race.  

But there’s another and probably more pertinent reason as to why the weaker subjects (southern Egyptians)  pulled off the otherwise inconceivable  feat of chasing the Hebrews all the way to Canaan.  It was all schemed by Enlilites as part of their ultimate agenda to get a tight grip on Canaan.  The Enlilites wanted the Hebrews to depart Egypt,  at least for the time being, and populate Canaan, which at the time was dominated by the descendants not of Abraham but  of Canaan (who fittingly lent their name to the entire territory), the son of Ham.

It was via Jerusalem King Anu, “Our Father Who Art In Heaven”, would land on planet Earth when he arrived from Nibiru and the appropriate people to welcome him were the Hebrews, the descendents of Shem and the legal owners of Canaan. If you recall, it  was  Shem’s people who were allocated Canaan when the Anunnaki partitioned the  known world after the Deluge of Noah’s day.

If the Enlilites wanted generations of Hebrews to have lived in Canaan by the time Anu returned, they were capable of orchestrating exactly that behind the scenes in whatever way would make it tenable. Thus using very tactfully sophisticated means to accomplish their end, they enfeebled the Hyksos and boosted the arsenals and military mettle of the indigenous Egyptians without the latter being aware that they were actually being aided and abetted by the very gods of their enemy. This Earth, My Brother …

PHARAOH AHMOSE RESTORES EGYPT TO GREATNESS

Throughout the 15 years that he was Pharaoh of a reunited Egypt (circa 1540-1525 BC), Ahmose saw to it that the Hyksos never again rebounded to present a thorn in the side of native Egyptians. He kept making inroads into Canaan and even as far as Syria and the Euphrates region  so as not to instill in them the merest sense of renewed hope of striking back at him again.

Not only did Ahmose recapture northern Egypt: he also overran Nubia (Sudan), whose leader had been an ally of the Hyksos and was therefore instrumental in bringing about southern Egypt’s economic strangulation.  Soon resources which southern Egypt was denied under Hykso hegemony now came in  flurries– gold and silver from Nubia; Lapis Lazuli from yonder in Central Asia; cedar from Lebanon; and turquoise from the re-opened mine at Serabit  El-Khadim in the Sinai wilds. The Egyptian empire prospered like never before and this was wholly under pitch-black rulers.

Now, northern Egypt was not completely emptied of the Hykso-Hebrew race. There were a few tens of thousands who had opted to remain in their bastion, Avaris, come what may out of fear of heading for a unfamiliar place, which was understandable having lived in Egypt for 500 years.  Of course Ahmose would have easily exterminated them if he wanted to for daring him, but he was not prepared to resort to such an extreme and barbaric measure in the spirit of botho. What he decided instead was to subject them to serfdom – slavery.

It was not that he exulted at seeing them in perpetual toil: this was done as a precautionary measure, with a view to ensuring that they did not regroup and launch a new uprising against central authority.  As far as Ahmose was concerned, the only safe Hebrew was an enslaved one. To his credit though, Hykso servitude under his rule was not that vindictive (that happened in the time of Ramses I, the Pharaoh of the Exodus, also referred to as the Pharaoh of the Oppression): it was relatively humane.

The Hyksos were mostly used in infrastructural projects. At the time, much of Avaris had been destroyed in the liberation war. Ahmose used free Hykso labour to rebuild it and renamed it Zaru. Zaru became the main outpost on the Asiatic frontier, the point at which Egyptian armies began and ended their campaigns against Canaan and Syria mainly. Although Ahmose made Thebes, in southern Egypt, the capital and chief religious centre of the country, he established his main residence at Memphis in northern Egypt to be close by in the event that Hyksos were up to some mischief.  

Ahmose died very young, from natural causes, in 1525 BC, at age 35. In fact, the greater majority of the 18th Dynasty’s 14 pharaohs died early. A modern-day surgeon at London’s Imperial College analysed the mummies of many of these pharaohs and determined that they likely died from a diseases of the nervous system known as  Temporal Lobotomy Epilepsy, which was embedded genetically in their case, an  adverse result, we suppose, of inbreeding as pharaonic marriages were typically between half or full siblings.   The disease typically begins at the end of the first or second decade of one’s life.

SIX MORE PHARAOHS RULE BEFORE JOSEPH’S DAY

Ahmosis was succeeded by his son Amenhotep I. Amenhotep (“Amen {Marduk}  is satisfied”) was not actually destined to rule.  His two older brothers, Sapair and Ankh, succumbed to illness before their father, which cleared the way for his ascension to the throne as the surviving eldest son. Amenhotep I was followed by Tuthmosis I.  His name meant “Son of Thoth”, Thoth being  the Egyptian name for Ningishzidda, Enki’s genius son.

All pharaohs were referred to as “Son of God”, the god being an Anunnaki whom they revered the most after the national god Marduk, who was known as Amen-Ra in Egypt. As such, Tuthmosis held Ningishzidda, who was reputed as the Anunnaki God of Knowledge and Wisdom, in very high esteem. This freedom of worship was thanks to Marduk. Marduk did not insist that his client kings worship him solely. He allowed them to worship whatever god they  wanted though in Egypt for one, this god had to be an Enkite.  But in his other jurisdictions, such as Babylon for instance, a king could even worship an Enlilite, a case in point being the great Hammurabi, who in his prayers invoked both Marduk and Utu-Shamash.

Tuthmosis I had 4 children with his chief wife Ahmose, 2 sons and daughters. Both his sons died before him and so for his heir, he settled for the eldest son of his junior wife. The son succeeded him as Tuthmosis II. But in order to secure his kingship, Tuthmosis II had to marry Hatshepsut, his half-sister, who was Tuthmosis I’s eldest daughter. Tuthmosis II and Hatshepsut had one child, a daughter. His successor, Tuthmosis  III,  therefore came from a junior wife. At the time of the pharaoh’s death, however, Tuthmosis III was just a little boy and so Hatshepsut ruled in his stead as regent.    

However, when  Tuthmosis III came of age, Hatshepsut refused to step down from the throne. Her bone of contention was that she merited being pharaoh even more than  Tuthmosis III in that her real  father, so she claimed, was not Tuthmosis I but the god Marduk himself, who had stealthily impregnated her mother Nefertiri. In the event, Tuthmosis III and her struck a compromise whereby by they ruled jointly, though it was Hatshepsut who really  called the shots. She ruled with distinction and has been  described as “the first great woman in history of whom we are informed”. She was the second female pharaoh after Sobkneferu of the 12th Dynasty, the only other female pharaoh being Cleopatra, the last pharaoh.

Tuthmosis III did become his own pharaoh after Hatshepsut’s death,  whereupon he ruled for the next 30 years or so.  A highly ambitious and expansionist ruler, he has been dubbed the “Napoleon of Egypt”, its greatest conqueror. During his tenure, he waged just under 20 wars and seized and captured over 350 cities stretching from Nubia (Sudan) to the Euphrates. This included the entire land of Canaan, which you must take note of as it is significant at this stage of the overall narrative.

Tuthmosis III was succeeded by Amenhotep II. Like his namesake Amenhotep I, Amenhotep II was not the natural heir. The natural heir, Amenemhat, and his mother died during Amehotep I’s reign. Following the death of his queen, Thothmosis III married a new wife, a non-royal. It was this non-royal wife who became the mother of Amenhotep II.

Amenhotep II was born and raised in Memphis in northern Egypt, where Hebrews teemed. Although he maintained the vast kingdom created by his father,  Amenhotep II was not keen on wars. He in fact forged a sustained peace with the Kingdom  of Mittani, which  was vying for Egypt for the control of Syria. But it was under Tuthmosis IV, the 8th pharaoh of the 18th Dynasty, that the Enlilites made the first decisive step to regain rulership of Egypt.

BIBLE MERGES SEVERAL PERSONS INTO ONE

At this juncture, we enter a rather grey area in the history of the Hebrew patriarchs. That is because the authors of the Old Testament have a tendency to merge the life histories of two to three different people into one (something akin to knitting together key events from the lives of Khama I, Khama II, and Khama III and presenting them in history as simply story of one person known as Khama) but without directly stating so.

For example, we know, courtesy of the Sumerian records, that when Genesis talks about Adam, it is actually talking about three Adams – the first primitive and sterile Adam, who was brought about (by way of genetic engineering) by Enki; the second, sexually productive  Adam,  who was placed in the garden of Eden (that is, the Edin in modern-day Iraq) and later expelled; and Adapa,  Enki’s son with an Earthling woman and who has gone into the annals of mankind as the first civilised human.  These three Adams were separated by thousands of years but Genesis fuses them into one, composite individual.


By the same token, there must have been several eminent, genetically related individuals who went by the names Jacob and  Joseph, but Genesis gives the impression, wrongly, that there was only one Jacob and one Joseph. Let’s take Joseph. According to the more comprehensive and reliable Egyptian records, Joseph rose to prominence in Egypt during the reigns of Pharaohs Thutmosis IV and Amenhotep III. These two pharaohs were in power during the  14th century BC. But Joseph,  Jacob’s son,  came along in the 16th century BC, which makes the 14th century BC Joseph a different person altogether although he certainly was a descendant of Jacob and the 16th century BC Joseph.

The above anomalies explain why  the Bible, when it  talks about the pharaohs of both Moses’s and Joseph’s day, does not specify by name which particular pharaoh it was, thus leaving us guessing.  Clearly, the authors of Genesis knew they had blended several Josephs or Jacobs into one individual and to associate them with only one particular pharaoh would have been the height of absurdity.

In the same vein, we now can understand  why such featureless names as Joseph or Moses were employed. We know they were not real names: Joseph meant “scion of a sheep”(to cite just one probable meaning as there were several), or simply Jew (sheep were known as Ewes in antiquity, which is pronounced Jew today) and Moses simply meant “son of”. If you are talking about different persons who you have merged into one composite figure, you play it safe by assigning  such a wooly name to that figure.     

Having regard to the aforesaid state of affairs, we must be wary that we do not be very dogmatic about timelines. In any case, historians and scholars themselves are not unanimous on the timelines of both the biblical patriarchs and the Egyptian pharaohs. They are the  first  to admit that most of the timelines are conjectural.

JOSEPH CHOSEN AS ENLIL’S TROJAN HORSE

According to Genesis, Joseph was sold to Egyptian slave merchants by his brothers out of sheer jealous as he was his father’s favourite child.  Of course reading the story at face value, which portrays the Jacobite family as simple, rural backwater sheep herders, one might naively believe the story when it is pure poppycock.

Maybe I’m repeating this for the hundredth time now:  the biblical patriarchs were not poor people. They were a rich dynasty, a ruling line.  They were never a poor, struggling clan. When they are referred to as shepherds, what that simply means is that they were their God Jehovah-Enlil’s docile followers, that is, theoretically at least, they obeyed him without question, stupidly, like sheep. The term shepherd also implied that they were the custodians (by hook and crook albeit) of the Age of the Ram, the Age of Sheep. That was what Enlil had designated them as.

So what point are we trying to drive across folks? It is that there was utterly no way a monarchic family would have sold a brother in the manner Genesis describes. The story is a total fiction. Every member of a dynastic family was always accompanied by a retinue of bodyguards especially in those turbulent times. The dynastic family head had spies permeating every aspect of life. That’s why when Reuben slept with his father’s wife, he was easily found out.  

If you want to know the real story of Joseph, you should turn to the Sumerian records, where you can piece together how events panned out, or immerse yourself into the works of Egyptologists. Joseph wasn’t sold into slavery in Egypt: he was deliberately planted. Why? The Enlilites, who had lost northern Egypt in 1525 BC and consequently hegemony over all Egypt, wanted to retake the country.

This wasn’t going to be by way of armed warfare: that would have been suicidal given that at the time, black-ruled Egypt was the superpower of the world, the America of the day. Egypt had to be re-conquered using tact. And the chosen spearhead of this programme of action was none other than Joseph. As indicated above, this Joseph was not necessarily the son of the familiar Jacob: he was almost certainly a different Joseph with a different father though he was a scion of the same dynastic family that was spawned ages before by Abraham.

WHY JOSEPH WAS APT

Why did the Enlilites choose Joseph in particular as the powder keg in their long-term strategy to win back Egypt, a critical country as it housed the aeronautically and metaphysically important Giza Pyramid?   There are several reasons. First, he was the bloodline heir. He might have been young but he certainly was born to the main wife of a 14th century Jacob. Second, he was exceedingly good looking and we all know that good looks can easily disarm people (ask Barack Obama or Prince William).

Third, he exuded a lot of charisma, another quality which almost automatically elicits a high and positive regard from people. Fourth, he was palpably  intelligent. He had the capacity to intellectually impress. Fifth, he exhibited gifts of a seer. He could interpret dreams and forecast future scenarios and that was at a very early age.  Finally, he was bold,  assertive,  and supremely confident in himself.

For example, he did not shrink from getting his older brothers to understand that that he was the most important person in the family, that all his brothers were his subjects futuristically, and he said that without batting an eyelid. Thus if you wanted to infiltrate and ultimately topple the enemy from the pedestal of power, Joseph, with his raft of qualities, was just the right person to deploy in such a potentially dangerous mission.

Now, with qualities such as Joseph possessed, he would easily attract attention and even curiosity from the Egyptian intelligence spooks who permeated practically every aspect of Egyptian society.  Indeed, his accent and skin colour would easily give him away. Soon he would be interrogated and it would emerge that he was a son of a powerful Hebrew political dynasty back in Canaan, who once ruled northern Egypt and were therefore   anathema to the Egyptian establishment. Once so exposed, he would be charged for espionage and end up  either in jail or in the grave. As such, to get him into Egypt anonymously, the Enlilites would have to use tact. Exactly what would that be?

NEXT WEEK:   JOSEPH ON CREST OF WAVE

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Technology saves Lions from angry Okavango villagers

22nd November 2022

Villagers in the eastern Okavango region are now using an alert system which warns them when collared lions approach livestock areas. The new technology is now regarded as a panacea to the human/wildlife conflict in the area as it has reduced mass poisoning and killing of lions by farmers.

The technology is being implemented by an NGO, Community Living Among Wildlife Sustainably (CLAWS) within the five villages of Seronga, Gunutsoga, Eretsha, Beetsha and Gudigwa in the eastern part of the Okavango delta.

A Carnivore Ecologist from CLAWS, Dr Andrew Stein explained that around 2013, villagers in the eastern Okavango were having significant problems with losses of their cattle to predators specifically lions, so the villagers resorted to using poison and shooting the lions in order to reduce their numbers.

He highlighted that as a form of progressive intervention, they designed a programme to reduce the conflicts and promote coexistence. Another component of the programme is communal herding, introduced in 2018 to reduce the conflict by increasing efficiency whereby certified herders monitor livestock health and protect them from predators, allowing community members to engage in other livelihood activities knowing that their livestock are safe.

They are now two herds with 600 and 230 cattle respectively with plan to expand the programme to other neighbouring villages. Currently the programme is being piloted in Eretsha, one of the areas with most conflict incidences per year.

Dr Stein explained that they have developed the first of its kind alert system whereby when the lions get within three or five kilometers of a cattllepost or a homestead upon the five villages, then it will release an alert system going directly to the cellphones of individuals living within the affected area or community.

‘So, if a colored lion gets to about five kilometers of Eretsha village or any villagers in the Eretsha that has signed up for, the system will receive an SMS of the name of the lion and its distance to or from the village”, he stated. He added that this enables villagers to take preventative action to reduce conflicts before its starts.

Dr Stein noted that some respond by gathering their cattle and put them in a kraal or put them in an enclosure making sure that the enclosure is secure while some people will gather firewood and light small fires around edges of the kraal to prevent lions from coming closer and some when they receive the SMS they send their livestock to the neighbours alerting them about the presence of lions.

He noted that 125 people have signed to receive the alert system within Seronga, Eretsha, Beetsha, Gunutsoga and Gudigwa. He added that each homestead is about five people and this means more than 600 people immediately receive the messages about lions when they approach their villages. He also noted that last year they dispersed over 12 000 alerts, adding that this year is a bit higher as about 20 000 alerts have been sent so far across these villages.

Stein further noted that they have been significant changes in the behavior of the villagers as they are now tolerant to lions. “85 percent were happy with the SMS and people are becoming more tolerant with living with lions because they have more information to reduce the conflicts,” he stressed.

Stein noted that since the start of the programme in 2014 they have seen lion populations rebounds almost completely to a level before and they have not recorded cases of lion poisoning in the last three years which is commendable effort.

Monnaleso Sanga from Eretsha village applauded the programme by CLAWS noting that farmers in the area are benefiting through the alert system and take preventative measures to reduce human/lion conflict which has been persistent in the area. He added that numbers of cattle killed by lions have reduced immensely. He also admitted that they are now tolerant to lions and they no longer kill nor poison them.

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THE IDEAL QUALITY OF A MUSLIM

8th September 2022

A Muslim is supposed to be and should be a living example of the teachings of the Quran and the ‘Sunnah’ (the teachings and living examples of Prophet Muhammed (SAW – Peace be upon Him). We should follow these in all affairs, relations, and situations – starting with our relationship with our Lord, our own self, our family and the people around us. One of the distinguishing features of the (ideal) Muslim is his faith in Allah, and his conviction that whatever happens in the universe and whatever befalls him, only happens through the will and the decree of the Almighty Allah.

A Muslim should know and feel that he is in constant need of the help and support of Allah, no matter how much he may think he can do for himself. He has no choice in his life but to submit to the will of his Creator, worship Him, strive towards the Right Path and do good deeds. This will guide him to be righteous and upright in all his deeds, both in public and in private.

His attitude towards his body, mind and soul

The Muslim pays attention to his body’s physical, intellectual and spiritual needs. He takes good care of his body, promoting its good health and strength. He shouldn’t eat in excess; but he should eat enough to maintain his health and energy. Allah, The Exalted, Says “…Eat and drink; but waste not by excess, for Allah loves not the wasters.” [Quran 7: 31]

The Muslim should keep away from alcohol and drugs. He should also try to exercise regularly to maintain his physical fitness. The Muslim also keeps his body and clothes clean, he bathes frequently. The Prophet placed a great emphasis on cleanliness and bathing. A Muslim is also concerned with his clothing and appearance but in accordance with the Islamic ideal of moderation, avoiding the extremes.

As for his intellectual care, the Muslim should take care of his mind by pursuing beneficial knowledge. It is his responsibility to seek knowledge whether it is religious or secular, so he may understand the nature and the essence of things. Allah Says: “…and say: My Lord! Increase me in knowledge.” [Quran 20: 114

The Muslim should not forget that man is not only composed of a body and a mind, but that he also possesses a soul and a spirit. Therefore, the Muslim pays as much attention to his spiritual development as to his physical and intellectual development, in a balanced manner which ideally does not concentrate on one aspect to the detriment of others.

His attitude towards people

The Muslim must treat his parents with kindness and respect, compassion, politeness and deep gratitude. He recognizes their status and knows his duties towards them. Allah Says “And serve Allah. Ascribe nothing as partner unto Him. (Show) kindness unto parents…” [Quran 4: 36]

With his wife, the Muslim should exemplify good and kind treatment, intelligent handling, deep understanding of the nature and psychology of women, and proper fulfilment of his responsibilities and duties.

With his children, the Muslim is a parent who should understand his responsibility towards their good upbringing, showing them love and compassion, influence their Islamic development and giving them proper education, so that they become active and constructive elements in society, and a source of goodness for their parents, community, and society as a whole.

With his relatives, the Muslim maintains the ties of kinship and knows his duties towards them. He understands the high status given to relatives in Islam, which makes him keep in touch with them, no matter what the circumstances.

 

With his neighbours, the Muslim illustrates good treatment, kindness and consideration of others’ feelings and sensitivities. He turns a blind eye to his neighbour’s faults while taking care not to commit any such errors himself. The Muslim relationship with his wider circle of friends is based on love for the sake of Allah. He is loyal and does not betray them; he is sincere and does not cheat them; he is gentle, tolerant and forgiving; he is generous and he supplicates for them.

In his social relationships with all people, the Muslim should be well-mannered, modest and not arrogant. He should not envy others, fulfils his promises and is cheerful. He is patient and avoids slandering and uttering obscenities. He should not unjustly accuse others nor should he interfere in that which does not concern him. He refrains from gossiping, spreading slander and stirring up trouble – avoids false speech and suspicion. When he is entrusted with a secret, he keeps it. He respects his elders. He mixes with the best of people. He strives to reconcile between the Muslims. He visits the sick and attends funerals. He returns favours and is grateful for them. He calls others to Islam with wisdom, example and beautiful preaching. He should guide people to do good and always make things easy and not difficult.

The Muslim should be fair in his judgments, not a hypocrite, a sycophant or a show-off. He should not boast about his deeds and achievements. He should be straightforward and never devious or twisted, no matter the circumstances. He should be generous and not remind others of his gifts or favours. Wherever possible he relieves the burden of the debtor. He should be proud and not think of begging.

These are the standards by which the (ideal) Muslim is expected to structure his life on. Now how do I measure up and fit into all this? Can I honestly say that I really try to live by these ideals and principles; if not can I really call myself a true Muslim?

For the ease of writing this article I have made use of for want of a better word, the generic term ‘he’, ‘his’, ‘him’ and the ‘male’ gender, but it goes without saying that these standards apply equally to every female and male Muslim.

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OUR BELOVED CHILDREN

29th August 2022

“Homicide and suicide kill almost 7000 children every year; one in four of all children are born to unmarried mothers, many of whom are children themselves…..children’s potential lost to spirit crushing poverty….children’s hearts lost in divorce and custody battles….children’s lives lost to abuse and violence, our society lost to itself, as we fail our children.” “If you bungle raising your children, I don’t think whatever else you do matters very much.” (Quotation taken from a book written by Hillary Clinton).

These words may well apply to us here in Botswana; We are also experiencing a series of challenges in many spheres of development and endeavour but none as challenging as the long term effects of what is going to happen to our youth of today. One of the greatest challenges facing us as parents today is how to guide our youth to become the responsible adults that we wish them to be, tomorrow.

In Islam Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) has enjoined upon the parents to take care of the moral and religious instruction of their children from the very beginning, otherwise they will be called to account for negligence on the Day of Judgement. Parents must inculcate God-consciousness in their children from an early age, whereby the children will gain an understanding of duty to The Creator.

 

The Holy Qur’an says: ‘O you who believe! Save yourself and your families from the Fire of Hell’. (Ch. 66: V6). This verse places the responsibility on the shoulders of the parents to ensure that training and guidance begin at home. The goal is to mould the child into a solid Islamic personality, with good morals, strong Islamic principles, knowledge and behavior so as to be equipped to face the demands of life in a responsible and mature manner. This should begin with the proper environment at home that inculcates the best moral and behavioral standards.

But what do we have instead? Believers of all Religious persuasions will agree that we have children growing up without parental guidance, a stable home environment, without role models, being brought up in surroundings that are not conducive to proper upbringing and moulding of well-adjusted children. These children are being brought up devoid of any parental guidance and increasingly the desperate situation of orphaned children having to raise their siblings (children raising children) because their parents have succumbed to the scourge of AIDS.

It is becoming common that more and more girls still in their schooling years are now falling pregnant, most of them unwanted, with the attendant responsibilities and difficulties.

Observe the many young ladies who are with children barely in their teens having illegitimate children. In the recent past there was a campaign focused on the ‘girl-child’; this campaign targeted this group of young females who had fallen pregnant and were now mothers. The situation is that the mother still being just a ‘child’ and not even having tasted adulthood, now has the onerous responsibility of raising her own child most of the time on her own because either the father has simply disappeared, refuses to takes responsibility, or in some cases not even known.

We cannot place the entire blame on these young mothers; as parents and society as a whole stand accused because we have shirked our responsibilities and worse still we ourselves are poor role models. The virtual breakdown of the extended family system and of the family unit in many homes means that there are no longer those safe havens of peace and tranquility that we once knew. How then do we expect to raise well-adjusted children in this poisoned atmosphere?

Alcohol has become socially acceptable and is consumed by many of our youth and alarmingly they are now turning to drugs. Alcohol is becoming so acceptable that it is easily accessible even at home where some parents share drinks with their children or buying it for them. This is not confined only to low income families it is becoming prevalent amongst our youth across the board.

 

It is frightening to witness how our youth are being influenced by blatantly suggestive pop culture messages over television, music videos and other social media. Children who are not properly grounded in being able to make rational and informed decisions between what is right and what is wrong are easily swayed by this very powerful medium.

 

So what do we do as parents? We first have to lead by example; it is no longer the parental privilege to tell the child ‘do as I say not as I do’- that no longer works. The ball is in the court of every religious leader (not some of the charlatans who masquerade as religious leaders), true adherents and responsible parents. We cannot ignore the situation we have to take an active lead in guiding and moulding our youth for a better tomorrow.

In Islam Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) said: “No father gives a better gift to his children than good manners and good character.”  Children should be treated not as a burden, but a blessing and trust of Allah, and brought up with care and affection and taught proper responsibilities etiquettes and behaviour.

Even the Bible says; ‘Suffer the little children to come unto me and forbid them not, for of such is the kingdom of God. Verily I say unto you, whosoever shall not receive the kingdom of God as a little child, he shall not enter therein’. (Mark 10:14-15)

The message is clear and needs to be taken by all of us: Parents let us rise to the occasion – we owe it to our children and their future.

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