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Nuclear Holocaust in India

Benson C Saili
THIS EARTH, MY BROTHER

   
Inanna and her Reptilian allies routed by the Anunnaki

In July 1945, the US detonated its first nuclear bomb at Alamogordo in the state of New Mexico as a dress rehearsal for what was to transpire in Japan. Subsequent to that, Robert Oppenheimer, the physicist who headed the Manhattan Project, the programme that spawned the atomic bomb, was asked by a student at Rochester University as to whether that was the first time an atomic weapon had been exploded on Earth.

Oppenheimer’s answer was revelatory. He said, “In modern times yes”. In other words, nuclear devices had been used before on this planet in ages past: Hiroshima and Nagasaki were not the first cities on the planet to bear the brunt of a nuclear blast.

How did Oppenheimer know this? As we keep telling you folks, the Illuminati know a great deal more about the world and its history than you and I do. But some of this  knowledge is not privileged as such: it’s out there  in ancient texts which the naive “intellectual” simply dismisses as pure myth. Indeed, behind closed doors, the Illuminati  just cannot help laughing at just how dumb we, the so-called “intelligentsia”, are. We’re supposed to be the leading lights, the beacons, of the society in which we live, but we’re just as benighted as the village idiot in the final analysis!

It is no secret that Oppenheimer was an avid student of the ancient Hindu and  Vedic texts. One such corpus, the 200,000-verse strong Mahabharata, sets out in graphic detail how “Aliens” went to war in India and used weapons which had the same effect as the two bombs dropped three days apart on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945 by “The Great Satan” Uncle Sam.

Since the Mahabharata War took place in a remote place in the Anunnaki’s Third Region and whose language (invented by Enki) was so radically different from Sumerian, it is not documented in the Sumerian chronicles. As such, we have only the Mahabharata document (and a sister document known as the Ramayan) as the only authoritative source.

But the problem with the Mahabharata document is that it is very complex: it uses Sanskrit names, not the familiar Sumerian or Akkadian names for the Anunnaki. Moreover, it is extremely difficult to tell who was fighting who as well as who exactly was part of the attendant alliances. One really has to wrack their brains and raptly read between the lines of the English translation to get the drift of the story.

But we know the Mahabharata War was an Anunnaki vs. Reptilian conflict because the Anunnaki were ruling Earth at the time it took place and Inanna in particular was the goddess of broader India, which those days encompassed all countries inhabited by peoples of the Indian race today and parts of other Asian countries.  

And since the war pitted the forces of Inanna against the forces of Enlil and very sophisticated weaponry was used on either side, Inanna alone wouldn’t have mastered that firepower: she must have had help. And the only anti-Anunnaki force she could have drawn on were the Earth-based Reptilians. There are actually more than superficial hints in the Mahabharata records that Reptilians did do duty in the war.

In fact, in 1999, Larceta, a Reptilian researcher, emerged from the subterranean Reptilian world in which she lived and gave a highly insightful interview to a bright Swedish recluse. In the interview, she touched on a series of wars that took place between her race and the Anunnaki in antiquity (see The Zeta Series).

VAIN MEDIATION EFFORTS BY ABRAHAM’S FATHER

As soon as Inanna had the Reptilians sign on the dotted line, she made her whereabouts known to the Anunnaki pantheon and served notice that she was going to war against them over the supremacy of Earth and would trounce them once and for all.  Intelligence emanating from Mohenjo Daro, where Inanna was headquartered, aided by satellite espionage, showed that Inanna was arming herself to the teeth having allied herself with the Reptilians. The scale of the weaponry at her disposal was such that if she struck the Anunnaki first, it would be a knockout. The Anunnaki had to work round the clock to prepare themselves for the fray and mount a pre-emptive attack.

Information with regard to exactly how the Alien belligerents made their preparations, how they deliberated, and how they strategised is sketchy. But Anu was informed and he certainly did give the Anunnaki   the go-ahead to engage in hostilities with Inanna & Co. Now, although Inanna was the goddess of the Third Region, her subjects were not unanimously loyal to her. They were in two factions fundamentally.

One faction, known as the Kaurava coalition, named after the main tribe, rallied behind Inanna. The other faction, known as the Pandava coalition, had no distinct sovereign territory (like the Kurds of the Middle East today, the world’s most populace race without an own official country) and so closed ranks with the Anunnaki.  

Perhaps the most prominent personage among the Pandava ranks was Krishna, called Terah in the Bible, the father of Abraham.  Krishna, who is usually compared with Jesus, was the Dalai Lama of the day. A demigod (a Anunnaki-Earthling hybrid),   Krishna was at once the chieftain of a tribe known as the Yadavas and Priest-King of the Kingdom of Dwaraka.   Initially, Krishna did not side with any of the feuding parties being a “holy man”.

So when it became apparent that hostilities were in the offing between the Kauravas and the Pandavas, he sought an audience with the Kauravas to plead with them to settle differences with their foes peacefully instead of resorting to war. Krishna knew that strictly speaking, the war was between the Reptilians and the Anunnaki and that humans were simply pawns in the chess game, but he would rather humans came to terms with each other and let Aliens slug it out on their own.       

Suspicious that all Krishna was trying to do was to lure them into a blindfold, the Kauravas told him to get lost.  It was this snub that forced him to throw in his lot with the Pandavas. Krishna’s main role among the Pandavas was that of a strategic guru though he did actively participate in the warfare with distinction.

WAR ERUPTS

When war broke out, it was fought from every frontier – by land, by air, and by sea, including in cities under the seabed.  Earthlings fought on dry land whereas the Aliens fought a high-tech war mainly in the air, though eventually the airborne war impacted on the happenings on terra firma.

It were the Anunnaki who took the war to the enemy, Inanna and her Reptilian allies. As such, the many theatre of the war was India, in particular the vast Kingdom of Kurukshetra, today called Haryana.   The main war zone spanned an area of 80 km2 and encompassed seven major forests.

Now, the Anunnaki had all kinds of sophisticated weaponry. Some they used in the war against each other but most of the weaponry they simply kept, either in the underground silos dotted all over the planet or on Mars and  the Moon. It is probable that the weaponry they requisitioned for use against Inanna came not from here but from Mars, transported in their lightning-quick flying saucers. .

On Inanna’s side, the beings who allied with her were not only Lizard beings: there were also the Nagas (part-snake, part-human) and the Supernas (part-bird, part human) according to a passage in the Mahabharata.  One day, these beings, or Intraterrestrials (beings of Alien genotype who are resident on Earth), attended a royal wedding. They arrived in vimanas, described as golden or gold plated “aerial cars” which could fly both in air and under the sea and could travel at a speed “swifter than thought”.

These Intraterrestrials were immortal, says the Mahabharata, because they drank a substance known as Soma or Ambrosia. Soma was made from the menstruum of a senior goddess.  The knowledge of preparing Soma, according to the Mahabharata texts, “was brought down to Earth from the Celestial Abode”. Since these were predominantly Reptilians, that could be in reference to the throne planet of the Draco star system, the principal domain of the Reptilian race. 

The Intraterrestrials’ favourite “sacrifice” was cattle. Why cattle? Because the god of that age (Taurus), Enlil, was represented by the bull and he was an enemy god to them.  The sacrificed animal in vogue in antiquity always represented the enemy. For example, in biblical times, the Jews, Enlil’s chosen people, were made to sacrifice the ram, a sheep, because it represented the Enlilite arch-enemy Marduk, who was the rightful god of Aries, the astrological Age of the Ram.   

In the human vs. human  confrontation, a total of approximately 4 million people took part in the war. They comprised of the chariot riders, the elephant riders, the horse riders, and the infantry in the main. The demigods, who were a tiny proportion, used tanks and other more sophisticated weapons.  

The Mahabharata characterises the Anunnaki as “gods” and the Intraterrestrials as the “Asura”.  It says, “The gods and the Asuras, both of them sprung from the Father of Gods and Men (King Anu of Nibiru, ‘Our Father Who Art In Heaven’), were [again] contending for superiority”. Of course the Intraterrestrials were not all cosmic subjects of Anu but this was in reference to Inanna fundamentally, who was a descendent of Anu.

The Intraterrestrials were mean as according to the Mahabharata, they unleashed ballistic missiles at the “Three Regions of the Earth” (Sumer, North Africa, and Canaan) from “three metal fortresses in the skies”, which simply means fighter craft along the lines of America’s Stealth Bomber. The Anunnaki offensive was horrendous.

A HIGH-TECH WAR

The weapons employed in the war comprised of  what we could call conventional weapons  and futuristic weapons in our day. Among the conventional weapons were landmines, Asthras (missiles), and Dhanush (rocket launchers).  A reference to land mines can be gleaned from a statement by Krishna, who talking about his own city Dwaravati  says, “And the land around the city for a  full two miles was rendered uneven, and holes and pits were dug thereon, and combustibles were secreted below the surface”.

There were weapons that did not kill but simply rendered the enemy unconscious – call them humane chemical weapons. These are referred to as the Sanmohana or Pramohana. An account of the use of one such weapon goes like this: “The youthful son of Drupada … applied that fierce weapon called Pramohana … Then those heroic warriors were deprived of their senses, their minds and strength afflicted by the Pramohana weapon.” But the effects of the Pramohana could also be reversed using a counter, antidote  weapon. 

“Then Drona beheld his sons deprived of their senses. Taking up then the weapon called Prajna, he neutralised the Pramohana weapon. Then his  sons, those mighty car-warriors, when their senses returned, once more proceeded to battle with Bhima and Prishata's sons.”

There were weapons that brought about artificial winds meant to disperse the clouds to either prevent rain or improve visibility, and weapons called the Varanuastra, which caused  artificial harm-inducing rain, something akin to acid rain. The Varanuastra is described thus in the Mahabharata: “When a warrior discharges a Varunuastra, its  smoke is converted into a cloud. The moment it comes in contact with air,  it converts the cloud to rain.” That sounds very much like our modern science of Artificial Rain, where chemicals like ammonium nitrate are used to rise and form rain clouds, then the density of the clouds are increased and finally a jet of rain-making chemicals is shot directly into the clouds.

Some defence weapons were capable of rendering one invisible to the naked eye. One combatant relates how the enemy, who he had targeted with a weapon “capable of going at a great height and possessing intense energy”, simply vanished into thin air. “I could not then see the car of costly metals (tank), for it had vanished, through illusion! I was then filled with wonder!”

There also were weapons which could strike a living target by simply tracking its sound. In one instance, a combatant lay in ambush as the enemy approached.  The enemy, who he hadn’t seen yet, kind of “set up a loud howl”. The combatant aimed a sound-tracking weapon in their direction and there was immediate silence as they all died. “They were all slain by those shafts of mine blazing as the sun and capable of striking at the perception of sound alone.”

Some weapons had effects that lingered many years after the war. One such weapon, called the Brahmasthira,   triggered a drought that lasted for 18 years in an entire region “for the clouds did not pour a drop of water there for this period".      Enlil’s third-born son,  referred to in the Mahabharata as “Storm God”, performed brilliantly in the war. Says one account of him: “On land, he smote ninety-nine strongholds of the Asuras, killing great numbers of their armed followers. In the skies,  he fought from his aerial car the Asuras, who were hiding in their ‘cloud fortresses’."

ATOMB BOMB BRINGS ABRUPT ENDING TO WAR

It was the use of nuclear weapons by the Anunnaki that brought the Mahabharata War to a sudden end. Somehow, the Intraterrestrial coalition was  caught off-guard since according to the Mahabharata text, they too had the technology to neutralise a nuclear bomb. It is also probable that there was a warfare convention in place which forbade the use of nuclear and other deadlier weapons but which the Anunnaki flouted to win the war decisively and expeditiously. The following is how the Mahabharata describes the nuclear bomb and its effects:

“Gurkha, flying a swift and powerful vimana, hurled a single projectile 
charged with the power of the Universe [nuclear device]. An incandescent column of smoke and flame, as bright as ten thousand suns, rose with all its splendour. It was an unknown weapon,
an iron thunderbolt, a gigantic messenger of death, which reduced to ashes the entire race of the Vrishnis and the Andhakas. The corpses were so burned as to be unrecognizable. Hair and nails fell out; pottery broke without apparent cause, and the birds turned white … After a few hours
all foodstuffs were infected  … To escape from this fire the soldiers threw themselves in streams
to wash themselves and their equipment.”

Another passage says, “The weapon that had been shot by Ashwathama blazed up with terrible flames within a huge sphere of fire (Mushroom Cloud in atomic parlance). Numerous peals of thunder were heard; thousands of meteors fell; and all living creatures became inspired with great dread. The whole world seemed to be filled with noise and assumed a terrible aspect with those flames of fire. The whole earth with her mountains and waters and trees trembled.” Still another passage says, “Explosions of final weapons decimated entire armies, causing crowds of warriors with steeds and elephants and weapons to be carried away as if they were dry leaves of trees.”

The two atom bombs that  were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki had the same  eerie effect. The Mahabharata War lasted for only 18 days. About half a million people  died and the cities of Mohenjo Daro and Harappa were wiped  out entirely, only to be unearthed in the 20th century in the 1920s. The Pandavas had defeated the Kauravas; the gods had trounced the Asuras; the Anunnaki had triumphed over the Intraterrestrials. Above all, Inanna-Ishtar had eaten humble pie: she had been vanquished by her own kith and kin.

EVIDENCE FOR ANCIENT ATOMIC WARFARE

The fact that nuclear weapons were used in the Mahabharata War is not simply a supposition: it has been borne out by archaeological excavations that were done at the sites of the ancient cities of Mohenjo Daro and Harappa from 1922 to 1931.  At Mohenjo Daro, about 37 skeletons were found.     

     
“All the skeletons were flattened to the ground,” says one report. “For example, a father, mother and child were found flattened in the street, facedown and still holding hands … The skeletons were scattered about the cities, many holding hands and sprawling in the streets as if some instant, horrible doom had taken place.”

These skeletons are among the most radioactive ever found on par with those at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. At one site, Soviet scholars found a skeleton which had a radioactive level 50 times greater than normal. The skeletons have been carbon-dated to 2500 BC but since carbon-dating is not pin-point accurate,  we should allow for a margin era of about 300 to 400 years, which brings the latest date  of the Mahabharata War to about 2140 BC according to our reckoning.

Author David Davenport says, “There was an epicentre about 50 yards wide where everything was crystallized, fused or melted. Sixty yards from the centre the bricks are melted on one side indicating a blast 4,000 years ago.” In Rajasthan, India, it was found that a layer of radio-active ash covered a three-square mile area. The Indian government was forced to cordon off the area on account of high rates of birth defects and cancer.
       
NEXT WEEK: IRON LADY IN CONTENTION AGAIN!

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Technology saves Lions from angry Okavango villagers

22nd November 2022

Villagers in the eastern Okavango region are now using an alert system which warns them when collared lions approach livestock areas. The new technology is now regarded as a panacea to the human/wildlife conflict in the area as it has reduced mass poisoning and killing of lions by farmers.

The technology is being implemented by an NGO, Community Living Among Wildlife Sustainably (CLAWS) within the five villages of Seronga, Gunutsoga, Eretsha, Beetsha and Gudigwa in the eastern part of the Okavango delta.

A Carnivore Ecologist from CLAWS, Dr Andrew Stein explained that around 2013, villagers in the eastern Okavango were having significant problems with losses of their cattle to predators specifically lions, so the villagers resorted to using poison and shooting the lions in order to reduce their numbers.

He highlighted that as a form of progressive intervention, they designed a programme to reduce the conflicts and promote coexistence. Another component of the programme is communal herding, introduced in 2018 to reduce the conflict by increasing efficiency whereby certified herders monitor livestock health and protect them from predators, allowing community members to engage in other livelihood activities knowing that their livestock are safe.

They are now two herds with 600 and 230 cattle respectively with plan to expand the programme to other neighbouring villages. Currently the programme is being piloted in Eretsha, one of the areas with most conflict incidences per year.

Dr Stein explained that they have developed the first of its kind alert system whereby when the lions get within three or five kilometers of a cattllepost or a homestead upon the five villages, then it will release an alert system going directly to the cellphones of individuals living within the affected area or community.

‘So, if a colored lion gets to about five kilometers of Eretsha village or any villagers in the Eretsha that has signed up for, the system will receive an SMS of the name of the lion and its distance to or from the village”, he stated. He added that this enables villagers to take preventative action to reduce conflicts before its starts.

Dr Stein noted that some respond by gathering their cattle and put them in a kraal or put them in an enclosure making sure that the enclosure is secure while some people will gather firewood and light small fires around edges of the kraal to prevent lions from coming closer and some when they receive the SMS they send their livestock to the neighbours alerting them about the presence of lions.

He noted that 125 people have signed to receive the alert system within Seronga, Eretsha, Beetsha, Gunutsoga and Gudigwa. He added that each homestead is about five people and this means more than 600 people immediately receive the messages about lions when they approach their villages. He also noted that last year they dispersed over 12 000 alerts, adding that this year is a bit higher as about 20 000 alerts have been sent so far across these villages.

Stein further noted that they have been significant changes in the behavior of the villagers as they are now tolerant to lions. “85 percent were happy with the SMS and people are becoming more tolerant with living with lions because they have more information to reduce the conflicts,” he stressed.

Stein noted that since the start of the programme in 2014 they have seen lion populations rebounds almost completely to a level before and they have not recorded cases of lion poisoning in the last three years which is commendable effort.

Monnaleso Sanga from Eretsha village applauded the programme by CLAWS noting that farmers in the area are benefiting through the alert system and take preventative measures to reduce human/lion conflict which has been persistent in the area. He added that numbers of cattle killed by lions have reduced immensely. He also admitted that they are now tolerant to lions and they no longer kill nor poison them.

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THE IDEAL QUALITY OF A MUSLIM

8th September 2022

A Muslim is supposed to be and should be a living example of the teachings of the Quran and the ‘Sunnah’ (the teachings and living examples of Prophet Muhammed (SAW – Peace be upon Him). We should follow these in all affairs, relations, and situations – starting with our relationship with our Lord, our own self, our family and the people around us. One of the distinguishing features of the (ideal) Muslim is his faith in Allah, and his conviction that whatever happens in the universe and whatever befalls him, only happens through the will and the decree of the Almighty Allah.

A Muslim should know and feel that he is in constant need of the help and support of Allah, no matter how much he may think he can do for himself. He has no choice in his life but to submit to the will of his Creator, worship Him, strive towards the Right Path and do good deeds. This will guide him to be righteous and upright in all his deeds, both in public and in private.

His attitude towards his body, mind and soul

The Muslim pays attention to his body’s physical, intellectual and spiritual needs. He takes good care of his body, promoting its good health and strength. He shouldn’t eat in excess; but he should eat enough to maintain his health and energy. Allah, The Exalted, Says “…Eat and drink; but waste not by excess, for Allah loves not the wasters.” [Quran 7: 31]

The Muslim should keep away from alcohol and drugs. He should also try to exercise regularly to maintain his physical fitness. The Muslim also keeps his body and clothes clean, he bathes frequently. The Prophet placed a great emphasis on cleanliness and bathing. A Muslim is also concerned with his clothing and appearance but in accordance with the Islamic ideal of moderation, avoiding the extremes.

As for his intellectual care, the Muslim should take care of his mind by pursuing beneficial knowledge. It is his responsibility to seek knowledge whether it is religious or secular, so he may understand the nature and the essence of things. Allah Says: “…and say: My Lord! Increase me in knowledge.” [Quran 20: 114

The Muslim should not forget that man is not only composed of a body and a mind, but that he also possesses a soul and a spirit. Therefore, the Muslim pays as much attention to his spiritual development as to his physical and intellectual development, in a balanced manner which ideally does not concentrate on one aspect to the detriment of others.

His attitude towards people

The Muslim must treat his parents with kindness and respect, compassion, politeness and deep gratitude. He recognizes their status and knows his duties towards them. Allah Says “And serve Allah. Ascribe nothing as partner unto Him. (Show) kindness unto parents…” [Quran 4: 36]

With his wife, the Muslim should exemplify good and kind treatment, intelligent handling, deep understanding of the nature and psychology of women, and proper fulfilment of his responsibilities and duties.

With his children, the Muslim is a parent who should understand his responsibility towards their good upbringing, showing them love and compassion, influence their Islamic development and giving them proper education, so that they become active and constructive elements in society, and a source of goodness for their parents, community, and society as a whole.

With his relatives, the Muslim maintains the ties of kinship and knows his duties towards them. He understands the high status given to relatives in Islam, which makes him keep in touch with them, no matter what the circumstances.

 

With his neighbours, the Muslim illustrates good treatment, kindness and consideration of others’ feelings and sensitivities. He turns a blind eye to his neighbour’s faults while taking care not to commit any such errors himself. The Muslim relationship with his wider circle of friends is based on love for the sake of Allah. He is loyal and does not betray them; he is sincere and does not cheat them; he is gentle, tolerant and forgiving; he is generous and he supplicates for them.

In his social relationships with all people, the Muslim should be well-mannered, modest and not arrogant. He should not envy others, fulfils his promises and is cheerful. He is patient and avoids slandering and uttering obscenities. He should not unjustly accuse others nor should he interfere in that which does not concern him. He refrains from gossiping, spreading slander and stirring up trouble – avoids false speech and suspicion. When he is entrusted with a secret, he keeps it. He respects his elders. He mixes with the best of people. He strives to reconcile between the Muslims. He visits the sick and attends funerals. He returns favours and is grateful for them. He calls others to Islam with wisdom, example and beautiful preaching. He should guide people to do good and always make things easy and not difficult.

The Muslim should be fair in his judgments, not a hypocrite, a sycophant or a show-off. He should not boast about his deeds and achievements. He should be straightforward and never devious or twisted, no matter the circumstances. He should be generous and not remind others of his gifts or favours. Wherever possible he relieves the burden of the debtor. He should be proud and not think of begging.

These are the standards by which the (ideal) Muslim is expected to structure his life on. Now how do I measure up and fit into all this? Can I honestly say that I really try to live by these ideals and principles; if not can I really call myself a true Muslim?

For the ease of writing this article I have made use of for want of a better word, the generic term ‘he’, ‘his’, ‘him’ and the ‘male’ gender, but it goes without saying that these standards apply equally to every female and male Muslim.

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OUR BELOVED CHILDREN

29th August 2022

“Homicide and suicide kill almost 7000 children every year; one in four of all children are born to unmarried mothers, many of whom are children themselves…..children’s potential lost to spirit crushing poverty….children’s hearts lost in divorce and custody battles….children’s lives lost to abuse and violence, our society lost to itself, as we fail our children.” “If you bungle raising your children, I don’t think whatever else you do matters very much.” (Quotation taken from a book written by Hillary Clinton).

These words may well apply to us here in Botswana; We are also experiencing a series of challenges in many spheres of development and endeavour but none as challenging as the long term effects of what is going to happen to our youth of today. One of the greatest challenges facing us as parents today is how to guide our youth to become the responsible adults that we wish them to be, tomorrow.

In Islam Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) has enjoined upon the parents to take care of the moral and religious instruction of their children from the very beginning, otherwise they will be called to account for negligence on the Day of Judgement. Parents must inculcate God-consciousness in their children from an early age, whereby the children will gain an understanding of duty to The Creator.

 

The Holy Qur’an says: ‘O you who believe! Save yourself and your families from the Fire of Hell’. (Ch. 66: V6). This verse places the responsibility on the shoulders of the parents to ensure that training and guidance begin at home. The goal is to mould the child into a solid Islamic personality, with good morals, strong Islamic principles, knowledge and behavior so as to be equipped to face the demands of life in a responsible and mature manner. This should begin with the proper environment at home that inculcates the best moral and behavioral standards.

But what do we have instead? Believers of all Religious persuasions will agree that we have children growing up without parental guidance, a stable home environment, without role models, being brought up in surroundings that are not conducive to proper upbringing and moulding of well-adjusted children. These children are being brought up devoid of any parental guidance and increasingly the desperate situation of orphaned children having to raise their siblings (children raising children) because their parents have succumbed to the scourge of AIDS.

It is becoming common that more and more girls still in their schooling years are now falling pregnant, most of them unwanted, with the attendant responsibilities and difficulties.

Observe the many young ladies who are with children barely in their teens having illegitimate children. In the recent past there was a campaign focused on the ‘girl-child’; this campaign targeted this group of young females who had fallen pregnant and were now mothers. The situation is that the mother still being just a ‘child’ and not even having tasted adulthood, now has the onerous responsibility of raising her own child most of the time on her own because either the father has simply disappeared, refuses to takes responsibility, or in some cases not even known.

We cannot place the entire blame on these young mothers; as parents and society as a whole stand accused because we have shirked our responsibilities and worse still we ourselves are poor role models. The virtual breakdown of the extended family system and of the family unit in many homes means that there are no longer those safe havens of peace and tranquility that we once knew. How then do we expect to raise well-adjusted children in this poisoned atmosphere?

Alcohol has become socially acceptable and is consumed by many of our youth and alarmingly they are now turning to drugs. Alcohol is becoming so acceptable that it is easily accessible even at home where some parents share drinks with their children or buying it for them. This is not confined only to low income families it is becoming prevalent amongst our youth across the board.

 

It is frightening to witness how our youth are being influenced by blatantly suggestive pop culture messages over television, music videos and other social media. Children who are not properly grounded in being able to make rational and informed decisions between what is right and what is wrong are easily swayed by this very powerful medium.

 

So what do we do as parents? We first have to lead by example; it is no longer the parental privilege to tell the child ‘do as I say not as I do’- that no longer works. The ball is in the court of every religious leader (not some of the charlatans who masquerade as religious leaders), true adherents and responsible parents. We cannot ignore the situation we have to take an active lead in guiding and moulding our youth for a better tomorrow.

In Islam Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) said: “No father gives a better gift to his children than good manners and good character.”  Children should be treated not as a burden, but a blessing and trust of Allah, and brought up with care and affection and taught proper responsibilities etiquettes and behaviour.

Even the Bible says; ‘Suffer the little children to come unto me and forbid them not, for of such is the kingdom of God. Verily I say unto you, whosoever shall not receive the kingdom of God as a little child, he shall not enter therein’. (Mark 10:14-15)

The message is clear and needs to be taken by all of us: Parents let us rise to the occasion – we owe it to our children and their future.

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