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Banda Seeks Immortality

Benson C Saili
THIS EARTH, MY BROTHER    

Inanna’s son launches quest to live forever like the “gods”

The one prize in life that has eluded man from the very foundation of the world is immortality, or eternal life.  Man has always wanted to live forever but the enabling genie of this age-old wish has simply refused to show up.

The so-called Elixir of Life, in the main conjured up in the mind as either the  Plant of Life or the Fountain of  Youth, has so exercised man’s imagination he has launched quests for  it from time to time only to draw a blank. Alexander the Great sought it. Christopher Columbus made two voyages to the Americas on behalf of King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain, the first being an exploratory voyage and the second being a quest for the Fountain of Youth.

In Anunnaki times, the quest for the Elixir of Youth was even more obsessive. The Sumerian records repeatedly tell how the so-called demigods, who were part-Anunnaki, part human – the ruling elite – undertook highly hazardous journeys in search of the Elixir of Life.   Their Anunnaki fathers or mothers just never died of natural causes and even if they did age they did so almost imperceptibly.   The demigods wanted to be like the Anunnaki too. They wanted to be like their “gods”.

Why did the Anunnaki live practically indefinitely? We have already pronounced on this subject but it merits restating. The one overriding factor was genetics. The Anunnaki’s Nibiru or Sirian-Orion genes gave them extraordinary longevity. However, here on Earth, they aged much faster compared to the rate at which they did on Nibiru and so they resorted to longevity-enhancing tricks.  One such trick was Ormus, the monoatomic white powder of gold. Another was Ambrosia or Star Fire, an extract of menstruum.  

The Anunnaki did avail Ormus or Star Fire to privileged Earthlings but they didn’t turn into the immortals the Anunnaki were. True, they did live considerably longer than ordinary humans courtesy of Ormus or Star Fire  – in tens of thousands of years initially and in hundreds of years latterly – but they did die  eventually. The demigods didn’t want to die: they wanted to live “forever” like the “gods”. And what was it they were certain would make them live indefinitely  like the Anunnaki, the ultimate Elixir of Life? It was the shem, the rocketship.

Metropolitan Earthlings believed that if they travelled to Nibiru by rocket, which they called “Heaven”, they would be given the Plant of Life and the Water of Life by King Anu, “Our Father Who Art In Heaven”, and upon their return to Earth, they would live forever like the Anunnaki. The story of Enoch was one such inspiration. Now, to get on a shem, one had to do two things fundamentally. First, they had to seek permission for the opportunity to ride on it from the God of Aviation – Utu-Shamash. Second, they had to travel to Tilmun in the Sinai Peninsula. This was the spaceport, the nearest place rockets were found (the other was half a world away in South America around Lake Titicaca).

The Anunnaki did from time to time give demigods the green light to endeavour to get to Tilmun and ride into space in a shem, but they made the process so lengthy and the endeavour itself so perilous  – by deliberate design – that  very few demigods attempted the venture at all. It was the equivalent of what the Illuminati today call “A Most  Dangerous Game” (in which according  to video and  bibliographical testimonies by surviving victims the likes of Bill Clinton and George H W Bush –read: “Reptilians” – have played their  part in hunting their enslaved humans in a restricted grove  for fun, capture them, and kill them: This Earth, My  Brother …). Of the demigods who did venture, two names immediately come to mind.  They are Lugalbanda and Gilgamesh.      

LUGALBANDA HEADS FOR BAALBEK

When Lugalbanda set out on his own quest for the Elixir of Life, it was not a shem to enable him travel to Nibiru he sought. All he wanted was to be given his own “Bird of Heaven”, an aircraft. Apparently, Lugalbanda was told by his own mother Inanna-Ishtar that if he were to search long and hard right here on Earth, he’d find the Elixir of Life himself. All he needed was his own “Sky Chamber” to scour every inch of the planet.

Remember, all Earthlings, including demigods, were barred from owning flying vessels of any kind or even learn how to pilot them. The demigods could fly on them too but only as passengers: ordinary humans could fly on them too but only as cargo. The reason for this  prohibition was that Enlil wanted to retain and embed in the psyche of mankind the mystique of flying vessels as “holy chariots” only pure Anunnaki were entitled too.  

Besides, he didn’t want any kind of vehicular technology to be mainstreamed to Earthlings for fear that they might begin to harbour delusions of grandeur and set about challenging the supremacy of the Anunnaki. It explained why Marduk was loathed by the Enlilites as his aim when he became the new Enlil was to bring Earthlings on par with the Anunnaki knowledgewise.

If it was an ordinary aircraft he sought, Lugalbanda didn’t have to venture as far as Tilmun. Baalbek in Lebanon, the so-called “Landing Place”, sufficed for this purpose in that it was Earth’s principal airport. All Anunnaki aircraft, except personal ones, were kept there and all Anunnaki aircraft were maintained there. The Anunnaki did not need the  across-the-globe proliferation of airports we have today.

Flying craft were the preserve only of Anunnaki royalty who were very few in number and passenger service was restricted only to the Anunnaki race, who numbered no more than 6000 on the entire planet. And most Anunnaki planes  were designed in such a way that they could land anywhere – on flat land, on mountainous terrain, and even on a body of water – and not on a conventional runway only (most aircraft were equipped with antigravity devices which made it possible for them to come to a halt in mid-air and hover for a while).     

So it was that Lugalbanda, accompanied by a sizeable retinue that included medics, the security detail, astronomers, navigators, and diarists,  set course straight for Baalbek from Uruk, a distance of 1245  km, equivalent, approximately,   to travelling from Gaborone to Monze in southern Zambia. Although the strictly overland journey was not exactly hazardous, it was policed in some spots.

Marduk had planted his chopper-borne intelligence spooks along the way just to make sure demigods with Enlilite blood were not unduly favoured by  Enlil and Utu-Shamash with access to strictly Anunnaki privileges. The role of the spies, who  were dismissively referred to as “snakes” or “scorpions” by Enlilites, was to deprive the traveller of any benefit he may have  been conferred if he did succeed in reaching Baalbek or Tilmun, both of which were controlled by Enlilites.      

“GET LOST YOU LULU”, LUGALBANDA TOLD

Lugalbanda managed to get to the “awesome place on Earth where the Anunnaki, gods of the mountain, inside the Earth like termites had tunnelled”, his own description of  the Cedar  Mountain – today known as Lebanon Mountain – atop which was the expansive Baalbek platform. Lugalbanda referred to the Cedar Mountain as “Mount Hurum, whose front Enlil as with a great door had closed off". When he was about 10 km away, he set off alone toward the  mountain pass, leaving his entire entourage behind as per the protocols of approach. The mountain pass was manned by heavily armed Anunnaki.

Also within the precincts of the mountain pass was a huge paramilitary aircraft designed to instil instant fear, known as the  Anzu Mushen, meaning the “Divine Black Bird”. Lugalbanda, or his scribe, naively describes the Anzu Mushen as, “a monster bird whose teeth are like those of a shark fish and its claws like a lion's and who can hunt down and carry a bull”. The allusion to a bull says something  profound about Lugalbanda – he was an Enlilite to the core as the bull was the symbol of  Enlil.     After introducing himself, Lugalbanda was immediately challenged by the gatekeeper, maybe the inspiration to the legendary Simon Peter who mans the pearly gates of Paradise.

“If a god you be, the (pass) word to you I will tell, in friendship will I let you enter,” the gatekeeper declared. “If a Lulu  you are, your fate  I will determine myself for no adversary into the Mountainland is allowed.” Lugalbanda had to state under oath that he was a full-blooded Anunnaki  to be admitted into the presence of Utu-Shamash. Otherwise, he’d be treated like a Lulu – a term which in the post-diluvial era had now assumed a derogatory connotation. Note that at this stage, the Enlilites regarded mankind as an “adversary”, another euphemism for an Enkite,  because they tended to side more with Enkites than Enlilites.   

Lugalbanda’s candid response  was that he was a treasured son of Inanna, like “divine Shara”. Shara was Inanna’s firstborn son with an Earthling and therefore was better known to the Anunnaki than Lugalbanda. Lugalbanda went on to say that he had come to seek  Shamash, his uncle, with a view to secure his own “Bird of Heaven”. He pleaded thus: “Like Utu, like Inanna, like the Seven Stormers of Ishkur in a flame,  let me lift myself off and thunder away! Let me go wherever my eyes can see. Wherever I desire, let me set my foot: wherever my heart wishes, let me arrive.”

When asked as to who his father was, Lugalbanda  replied with the same candour: he said Enmerkar, who was half-human, half- Anunnaki,  was his father. That did  it as far as the gatekeeper was concerned. Lugalbanda had flunked  the  “One-Drop-Rule”, which stipulated that if one had just a single drop of human blood in them, they were not Anunnaki  but Earthling. Lugalbanda was there and then    turned back and told point-blank that “you might reach far lands and even make Uruk and yourself famous but wherever you want to go, it will always be  on your big flat feet.” Lugalbanda would never come to own a plane in his life. He wept as he turned round to rejoin his entourage and break the harrowing news.  

EPIC OF GILGAMESH COMMENCES

If Lugalbanda had only sought an aircraft to employ as a means to make a reality of his search for the  Elixir of Life, his more ambitious heir  went a step further: he wanted to ascend to Nibiru in a shem to partake of the  Plant and Water of Life and not simply to go on a wild goose chase in a “sky chamber” here on Earth. In fact, the story of Lugalbanda’s son’s quest for eternal life is the most famous in ancient annals. It is the most widely documented and referenced of mankind’s most spirited endeavours to attain immortality.

When Lugalbanda died, he was not immediately succeeded by his firstborn son. For reasons that are not fully explained in the Sumerian chronicles, there was an interregnum in which somebody going by the name Dumuzi ruled Uruk before Lugalbanda’s heir did. Since by this time Dumuzi had long been dead, this Dumuzi was in truth “Dumuzi Jr” – his son.

This is no doubt the King of Aratta, who the Sumerian tablets crystal-clearly refer to as Dumuzi’s son by an Earthling woman, not by  Inanna. It appears that for some reason, Inanna asked Dumuzi Jr to base himself in Uruk and rule both Uruk and Aratta  for a specified period of time. Perhaps fed up of shuttling forth between Uruk and Aratta just to be humped, Inanna now wanted him just next door to the Eanna and therefore at her immediate sexual beck and call.

Lugalbanda’s heir is best known as Gilgamesh but this is an abbreviated form of his full, theophoric  name –  Gishbilgamesh. According to the Anunnaki’s matrimonial decorum, it fell to the female spouse to name a child. As such, Ninsun, Lugalbanda’s goddess wife, named her firstborn son  after her half-brother Gibil, Enki’s third-born son with his official wife Damkina. Indeed, Gishbilgamesh  means, “To  Gibil, God of Smelting/Casting Dedicated”.  

The name is most fitting  given that Uruk was a leading metallurgical centre and Ninsun obviously intended her son to grow to be a great metallurgist and a knowledgeable overseer of Uruk’s metal foundries.   With a name that evoked a son of Enki, it goes without saying that Gilgamesh was  looked upon favourably by the Enkites and possibly earmarked as a future ally. In the Sumerian chronicles, Gilgamesh is also described as “of the essence  of Ninurta”. This should not be interpreted to mean he was Ninurta’s offspring as some of the scholars have wrongly posited.

What it all suggests is that he did have Ninurta’s genes in him. Remember, Ninurta and Ninsun shared a common mother – Ninmah: only their fathers were different, with Ninurta’s being  Enlil, and Ninsun’s being Enki.  But it was Shamash who was Gilgamesh’s godfather. Wary that the Enkites could try to brainwash and indoctrinate him with  Enkite propaganda, Shamash took Gilgamesh under his wing from a very early age.

He thus grew up  not under the tutelage of Uncle Gibil but under that of Uncle Shamash.  Although he juggled several aviation-related portfolios that required him to be at the terrestrial Landing Place at Baalbek, Mission Control Centre at Jerusalem, and the two spaceports at Tilmun in the Sinai Peninsula and at Lake Titicaca  in South America, Shamash did make sure he spared  time to be with his charismatic and imposing Earthling nephew.

GILGAMESH SPURNS OOZY INANNA

In his formative years as the 5th King of Uruk, Gilgamesh almost overnight gained  a reputation as a benevolent, pro-poor, and high-achieving  monarch. Beyond fortifying Uruk further  and adorning  the Eanna, Inanna’s temple-house, he enhanced Uruk’s renown as an international trade crossroads and as a standout military power that made its neighbours quake in their boots. Better still, he was very much a man of the people who liberally wined, dined and sported with his subjects.  

Unlike his Lilliputian father Lugalbanda, Gilgamesh was a man of vast proportion, having been favoured by his mother’s side of the gene pool. The Epic of Gilgamesh, a famous Sumerian text which documents his exploits, describes Gilgamesh as “lofty, endowed with a super-human size”, meaning he was  of Anunnaki build, something of a cross between Samson and  Goliath. 

His favourite pastime was to challenge  the hulks among Uruk youth to a formal wrestling match, all of whom  he frequently defeated by pinfall, submission, or outright surrender. And once in a while, he would take on a beast, such  as a bull, buffalo, or lion,  and tear it to shreds with his bare hands. These extraordinary feats coupled with the common-touch camaraderie with ordinary folk would over time make him the most reminisced about of Uruk’s 12 kings.     

Because of his great, graceful  physique and sheer virility, it was a matter of course that he would no sooner attract the amatory attentions of who other than his own grandmother – the evergreen Inanna, who still had enormous sex appeal that belied her age of shars. One day, whilst Gilgamesh was taking a mid-day swim in a secluded brook in a nearby woods (he liked roaming the wilds), Inanna stalked him. She materialised  just at the time when  he was emerging from the water stark naked.

Transfixed by both his great, muscular  body and his colossal groin apparatus, Inanna took off her clothes forthwith and sashayed toward him.  “Glorious Ishtar raised an eye at the beauty of Gilgamesh,” the Sumerian epic says.  “Come Gilgamesh, be thou my lover,” she propositioned, her face flushed with desire. “ Grant me the fruit of thy love. You be my man: I shall be your woman.”      Inanna went on to promise Gilgamesh all sorts of treats if he responded to her advances in the affirmative and administered to her her first “fix” right on the spot so senselessly aroused was she.

They included a golden chariot adorned with lapis lazuli;  a magnificent palace; and lordship over other kings and princes.  “Kings, princes, and nobles would bow to you; your flocks would double and quadruple; the produce of field and mountain shall be your  fill,” she assured him as she breathlessly stroked  his mammoth manhood with two clasped hands. Above all, she undertook to give him that ordinarily unattainable prospect that was mankind’s greatest craving. “I will obtain for you eternal life,” she vowed, pointing to the skies as a metaphor for Nibiru,  mankind’s idea of Heaven.  

Gilgamesh, however, was no dupe. He was aware that although Inanna was unsurpassed as a romantic, her relationships never endured. In fact, the only single affair that lasted was the one with Dumuzi; otherwise, all others quickly fizzled out. She discarded lovers as easily as she seduced them. Worse still, she was never one to devote to a relationship. She shuffled men willy-nilly like a pack of cards. Spelling out the names of five such men Inanna had “as a shoe which pinches the foot of its owner” dumped unceremoniously for reasons only she knew, Gilgamesh countered thus:

“Which of your lovers lasted forever? Which of your masterful paramours went to Heaven? if you will ‘love’ me, you shall treat me just like them.” Inanna was hurt, disappointed, and chagrined by the Gilgamesh rebuff. But as far as she was concerned, that was not the end of the matter.

NEXT WEEK:  SAMSON Vs HERCULES!  

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The Daring Dozen at Bari

8th December 2020
JEFF---Batswana-smoke-unit

Seventy-seven years ago, on the evening of December 2, 1943, the Germans launched a surprise air raid on allied shipping in the Italian port of Bari, which was then the key supply centre for the British 8th army’s advance in Italy.

The attack was spearheaded by 105 Junkers JU88 bombers under the overall command of the infamous Air Marshal Wolfram von Richthofen (who had initially achieved international notoriety during the Spanish Civil War for his aerial bombardment of Guernica). In a little over an hour the German aircraft succeeded in sinking 28 transport and cargo ships, while further inflicting massive damage to the harbour’s facilities, resulting in the port being effectively put out of action for two months.

Over two thousand ground personnel were killed during the raid, with the release of a secret supply of mustard gas aboard one of the destroyed ships contributing to the death toll, as well as subsequent military and civilian casualties. The extent of the later is a controversy due to the fact that the American and British governments subsequently covered up the presence of the gas for decades.

At least five Batswana were killed and seven critically wounded during the raid, with one of the wounded being miraculously rescued floating unconscious out to sea with a head wound. He had been given up for dead when he returned to his unit fourteen days later. The fatalities and casualties all occurred when the enemy hit an ammunition ship adjacent to where 24 Batswana members of the African Pioneer Corps (APC) 1979 Smoke Company where posted.

Thereafter, the dozen surviving members of the unit distinguished themselves for their efficiency in putting up and maintaining smokescreens in their sector, which was credited with saving additional shipping. For his personal heroism in rallying his men following the initial explosions Company Corporal Chitu Bakombi was awarded the British Empire Medal, while his superior officer, Lieutenant N.F. Moor was later given an M.B.E.

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A Strong Marriage Bond Needs Two

8th December 2020

Remember: bricks and cement are used to build a house, but mutual love, respect and companionship are used to build a HOME. And amongst His signs is this: He creates for you mates out of your own kind, so that you may find contentment (Sukoon) with them, and He engenders love and tenderness between you; in this behold, there are signs (messages) indeed for people who reflect and think (Quran 30:21).

This verse talks about contentment; this implies companionship, of their being together, sharing together, supporting one another and creating a home of peace. This verse also talks about love between them; this love is both physical and emotional. For love to exist it must be built on the foundation of a mutually supportive relationship guided by respect and tenderness. As the Quran says; ‘they are like garments for you, and you are garments for them (Quran 2:187)’. That means spouses should provide each other with comfort, intimacy and protection just as clothing protects, warms and dignifies the body.

In Islam marriage is considered an ‘ibaadah’, (an act of pleasing Allah) because it is about a commitment made to each other, that is built on mutual love, interdependence, integrity, trust, respect, companionship and harmony towards each other. It is about building of a home on an Islamic foundation in which peace and tranquillity reigns wherein your offspring are raised in an atmosphere conducive to a moral and upright upbringing so that when we all stand before Him (Allah) on that Promised Day, He will be pleased with them all.

Most marriages start out with great hopes and rosy dreams; spouses are truly committed to making their marriages work. However, as the pressures of life mount, many marriages change over time and it is quite common for some of them to run into problems and start to flounder as the reality of living with a spouse that does not meet with one’s pre-conceived ‘expectations’. However, with hard work and dedication, couples can keep their marriages strong and enjoyable. How is it done? What does it take to create a long-lasting, satisfying marriage?

Below are some of the points that have been taken from a marriage guidance article I read recently and adapted for this purposes.

POSITIVITY
Spouses should have far more positive than negative interactions. If there is too much negativity — criticizing, demanding, name-calling, holding grudges, etc. — the relationship will suffer. However, if there is never any negativity, it probably means that frustrations and grievances are not getting ‘air time’ and unresolved tension is accumulating inside one or both partners waiting to ‘explode’ one day.

“Let not some men among you laugh at others: it may be that the (latter) are better than the (former): nor let some women laugh at others: it may be that the (latter) are better than the (former): nor defame nor be sarcastic to each other, nor call each other by (offensive) nicknames.” (49:11)

We all have our individual faults though we may not see them nor want to admit to them but we will easily identify them in others. The key is balance between the two extremes and being supportive of one another. To foster positivity in a marriage that help make them stable and happy, being affectionate, truly listening to each other, taking joy in each other’s achievements and being playful are just a few examples of positive interactions.
Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) said: “The believers who show the most perfect faith are those who have the best character and the best of you are those who are best to their wives”

UNDERSTANDING

Another characteristic of happy marriages is empathy; understanding your spouses’ perspective by putting oneself in his or her shoes. By showing that understanding and identifying with your spouse is important for relationship satisfaction. Spouses are more likely to feel good about their marriage and if their partner expresses empathy towards them. Husbands and wives are more content in their relationships when they feel that their partners understand their thoughts and feelings.

Successful married couples grow with each other; it simply isn’t wise to put any person in charge of your happiness. You must be happy with yourself before anyone else can be.  You are responsible for your actions, your attitudes and your happiness. Your spouse just enhances those things in your life. Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) said: “Treat your women well and be kind to them for they are your partners and committed helpers.”

COMMITMENT

Successful marriages involve both spouses’ commitment to the relationship. The married couple should learn the art of compromise and this usually takes years. The largest parts of compromise are openness to the other’s point of view and good communication when differences arise.

When two people are truly dedicated to making their marriage work, despite the unavoidable challenges and obstacles that come, they are much more likely to have a relationship that lasts. Husbands and wives who only focus on themselves and their own desires are not as likely to find joy and satisfaction in their relationships.

ACCEPTANCE

Another basic need in a relationship is each partner wants to feel valued and respected. When people feel that their spouses truly accept them for who they are, they are usually more secure and confident in their relationships. Often, there is conflict in marriage because partners cannot accept the individual preferences of their spouses and try to demand change from one another. When one person tries to force change from another, he or she is usually met with resistance.

However, change is much more likely to occur when spouses respect differences and accept each other unconditionally. Basic acceptance is vital to a happy marriage. Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) said: “It is the generous (in character) who is good to women, and it is the wicked who insults them.”
“Overlook (any human faults) with gracious forgiveness.” (Quran 15:85)

COMPASSION, MUTUAL LOVE AND RESPECT

Other important components of successful marriages are love, compassion and respect for each other. The fact is, as time passes and life becomes increasingly complicated, the marriage is often stressed and suffers as a result. A happy and successful marriage is based on equality. When one or the other dominates strongly, intimacy is replaced by fear of displeasing.

It is all too easy for spouses to lose touch with each other and neglect the love and romance that once came so easily. It is vital that husbands and wives continue to cultivate love and respect for each other throughout their lives. If they do, it is highly likely that their relationships will remain happy and satisfying. Move beyond the fantasy and unrealistic expectations and realize that marriage is about making a conscious choice to love and care for your spouse-even when you do not feel like it.

Seldom can one love someone for whom we have no respect. This also means that we have to learn to overlook and forgive the mistakes of one’s partner. In other words write the good about your partner in stone and the bad in dust, so that when the wind comes it blows away the bad and only the good remains.

Paramount of all, marriage must be based on the teachings of the Noble Qur’an and the teachings and guidance of our Prophet Muhammad (PBUH). To grow spiritually in your marriage requires that you learn to be less selfish and more loving, even during times of conflict. A marriage needs love, support, tolerance, honesty, respect, humility, realistic expectations and a sense of humour to be successful.

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Chronic Joblessness: How to Help Curtail it

30th November 2020
Motswana woman

The past week or two has been a mixed grill of briefs in so far as the national employment picture is concerned. BDC just injected a further P64 million in Kromberg & Schubert, the automotive cable manufacturer and exporter, to help keep it afloat in the face of the COVID-19-engendered global economic apocalypse. The financial lifeline, which follows an earlier P36 million way back in 2017, hopefully guarantees the jobs of 2500, maybe for another year or two.

It was also reported that a bulb manufacturing company, which is two years old and is youth-led, is making waves in Selibe Phikwe. Called Bulb Word, it is the only bulb manufacturing operation in Botswana and employs 60 people. The figure is not insignificant in a town that had 5000 jobs offloaded in one fell swoop when BCL closed shop in 2016 under seemingly contrived circumstances, so that as I write, two or three buyers have submitted bids to acquire and exhume it from its stage-managed grave.

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