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Zidda Illumines America

Benson C Saili
THIS EARTH, MY BROTHER  
 

Meanwhile, Marduk has a new rival to contend with courtesy of Inanna

Ningishzidda’s departure from Egypt to Babylon in August 3113 BC was significant in his own view.  In that very same month, he introduced a new calendar to toast to the peace of mind that came with his move. Zidda though did not intend to stay in Babylon for long: it was simply a whistle-stop on his way to the Americas. The moment he arrived in Babylon, he sent an advance party of a loyal team of Olmecs – the dark-skinned, Bantu-like  Anunnaki – to the Americas so they could prepare for his arrival there as per Enki’s urging. Then three years later, in 3110 BC, Zidda himself set off for the Americas after the Olmecs had signalled to him that he was being awaited there with bated breath as their prospective god.  

In the Americas, Zidda’s legal domain encompassed Mesoamerica (Mexican-speaking territories which included the whole of Mexico and parts of today’s US) and Central America but his influence permeated all the way down to the northern parts of South America.  The people he ruled over were the Aztecs, today known as Mexicans ; the Yucatans, who are found in the northern parts of Mexico;  the Mayans, who today inhabit southern Mexico, El Salvador, Belize, and Honduras;  and the Incas of ancient Peru.

The Mayans document that their “white-skinned, bearded god” arrived during the Fourth Sun, which they called “The Era of the Black-Headed People”.  We know by now that the Black-Headed people was how the Anunnaki referred to mankind in general but to the Sumerians in particular. The Codex Rios, which was written in 1566, says the Fourth Sun began “5042 years ago”. Counting from our day, this dates back to approximately 6,000 years ago, when the Sumerian civilisation blossomed.

As god of the Americas, Zidda was known by several names. The Aztecs called him Quetzalcoatl, meaning “Flying Reptile”. This was because he was an Enkite – the Serpent race – and he flew in a huge aircraft. The Incas called him Viracocha, meaning “Creator of All”. The Mayans called him Kulcan, meaning “Great Bird of the Snake”, again in reference to both his flying craft and his genetic pedigree. The Yucatans called him Votan, whose meaning is obscure. But they do give us a clue as to who Votan was.

He’s characterised as “the first man whom God had sent to this region to people and parcel out the land that is now called America”. The Yucatans go on to say, “…  his emblem was the Serpent. He was a descendant of the Guardians, of the race of Can. His place of origin was a land called Chivim … At the tributary of a great river he built a city which was the cradle of this civilisation …  He called the city Nachan, which means Place of Serpents."

There are a lot of tell-tales in the above pieces of data. The “Guardians”, or Neteru, was how the Anunnaki were referred to by Egyptians. The Serpent was the insignia of the Enkites, in particular Enki and Zidda: even Marduk was scorned as “The Great Serpent” by the Enlilites. The notion of Votan having descended from the race of “Can” – the biblical Cain, the founder of the Indian race – is a mix-up but only slightly so as Cain, having been sired by Enki and Titi-Eve, had more Anunnaki than human blood in him. Chivim was in Canaan and the Canaanites were found in both Egypt and Palestine. Nachan jells very well with Nachash – the Hebrew word for Serpent.   

There was a yet another little-known name by which Zidda was called by the Peruvians but which today carries  more resonance geopolitically than the rest. This was Amaruca. Amaruca derived from the ancient compound word  Ome-Ori-Eke, which meant  “Divine Creator Spirit”, or simply God. It was Amaruca/Ome-Ori-Eke which through a linguistic twist and the evolution simply of words became America. The official version of how the name America came about is that it was in honour of the pioneering Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci (1454-1512).

However, researchers have long debunked this claim. It has been found that Vespucci actually changed his first name from Alberigo, his original name, to Amerigo after his return from the Americas (North and South America). In other words, the continents were already known by the name America long before he turned up there. In any case, if the two continents were to be named after him, they would have been called Vespucca, after his surname. Landmarks are named after a legend’s surname (or both names in some cases) and not his first name. One example is America’s political capital, which is known as Washington and not George.

BLACK ANUNNAKI CIVILISE AMERICA

In the Mayan annals, Quetzacoatl has been described as “tall of stature, bright of countenance, bearded, and wearing a long tunic. His staff, shaped like a serpent, was painted black, white, and red; it was inlaid with precious stones and adorned with six stars”. He was the great benefactor of the Hispanics in all manner of ways. He inaugurated his own civilisation for that region of the world when he arrived there  in 3110 BC. He was “master of wisdom and knowledge” who “introduced learning, crafts, laws, and time reckoning according to the fifty-two-year cycle.”

But the white-skinned Zidda was simply the figurehead: the people who actually civilised the Americas were his loyalist men, the Olmecs, who even today remain immortalised in stone in various parts of that region. The Olmecs were the first to arrive in the Americas in 3113 BC and by the time Zidda joined them in 3110 BC, they had made mammoth strides in revolutionalising the region. Writes Zechariah Sitchin in his War of the Gods: “The first Mesoamerican glyphic writing appears in the Olmec realm; so does the Mesoamerican system of numeration, of dots and bars.

The first Long Count calendar inscriptions, with the enigmatic starting date in 3113 BC; the first works of magnificent and monumental sculpted art; the first use of jade; the first depictions of hand-held weapons or tools; the first ceremonial centres; the first celestial orientations—all were achievements of the Olmecs. No wonder that with so many ‘firsts’, some (as J. Soustelle, The Olmecs) have compared the Olmec civilisation of Mesoamerica to that of the Sumerians in Mesopotamia, which accounted for all the ‘firsts’ in the ancient Near East.”

It’s small wonder the meticulously sculpted Olmec stone heads are so colossal – to testify to the fact that they wrought great accomplishments in Mesoamerica. One such sculpture “measured about eight feet in height, twenty-one feet in circumference, and weighed about twenty-four tons. It depicts without question a Negroid African wearing a distinct helmet.” The latter part, of the Olmecs being “Negroid Africans”, is a mere assumption owing to the fact that indeed the Olmecs bore features that were African in every respect. But the fact of the matter is that they were not Africans at all: they were dark-skinned Anunnaki.

If you expected Caucasian chroniclers who write much of Earth’s history to state categorically that these great, gigantic dark-skinned people were from another planet, you would be deluding yourself. They would rather say the Anunnaki were “blonde-haired, blue-eyed, and white-skinned”. Yet the Anunnaki, as we keep emphasising, were not a homogeneous race: they came in all hues – black, white, Indian-like, Chinese-like, Semitic-like, Hispanic-like, etc. The white-skinned Anunnaki are famous only because they were the ruling clique. It were the Olmecs who did much of the gold mining in Africa before Enki fashioned mankind as their skin pigmentation was more amenable to the climactic conditions of the planet  obtaining at the time, which the white-skinned Anunnaki found oppressive in the extreme. And it was the gene of an Olmec that Enki blended with that of Ape Man to create Adam.

Of particular significance was  Zidda’s now famous Mayan Calendar, known as the Long Count.  Writes Zechariah Sitchin. “The oldest of the three Mesoamerican calendars is known as the Long Count: it counted the number of days from a ‘Day One’ that scholars have identified as August 13, 3113 BC. Alongside this continuous but linear calendar there were two cyclical calendars. One, the Haab, was a solar-year calendar of 365 days, divided into 18 months of 20 days each plus an additional 5 special days at year’s end.

The other was the Tzolkin, a Sacred Calendar of only 260 days, composed of a 20-day unit rotated 13 times. The two cyclical calendars were then meshed together, as two geared wheels to create the Sacred Round of 52 years, when these two counts returned to their common starting point and started the counts all over again.”

Zidda introduced three calendars in Mesoamerica, the  most famous being the Long Count, which  brought  the year 2012  to the fore of global discourse. A Long Count is a cycle of 5126 years. The starting point of this calendar was what the Mayans called Point Zero – the very year Zidda devised the Long Count, or 3113 BC. The Long Count can be measured in days (a  kin); 20-days (1 uinal); 360-days ( 1 tun); 7,200-days (1 katun); and lastly 144,000-days (1 baktun). 

Typically, the Long Count is measured in baktuns. Now, if  you count the number of years that will have passed from 3113 BC to the end of 2012, you will arrive at exactly 5126 years. A Long Count equals 13 baktuns, or  1,872,000 days (144,000 x 13). The 13th Baktun ended on December 22  2012, such that in January 2013, the cycle began all over again. Since 13 is a unlucky number to the wider world (yet a lucky number to the Illuminati), it explained the trash talk that ran riot about the end of the world on 22 December 2012. It was all bollocks really as we rightly predicted in one of our Weekend Post articles of April 2012.

EXIT ZIDDA, ENTER DUMUZI

If Marduk thought by getting Zidda out of the way he was now firm in the saddle, he was greatly mistaken. For no sooner had Zidda left the scene than another contender emerged to try and throw a spanner in the works.  This was none other than his youngest brother Dumuzi.  Dumuzi was Enki’s youngest son and automatically the dearest as all lastborns are. “Greatly beloved was Dumuzi,” the Sumerian records relate. “By Enki after the death of Asar (Osiris)  he was favoured.” But as much as Enki doted on Dumuzi, the Enlilites were enamoured of him too. They looked upon him as a possible political ally.

To date, they had to a degree won over two Enkites. These were Nergal, Marduk’s immediate younger brother, and Zidda, the fourth   brother. Nergal was won over when he was enticed to marry Ereshkigal, Enlil’s granddaughter  through his second-born son Nannar-Sin. Zidda was  to all intents and purposes a direct Enlilite stake: he was Ereshkigal’s son, having arose in the course of a romantic liaison between Enki and Ereshkigal that predated the latter’s marriage to Nergal. The Enlilite eyes now were set on Dumuzi too. Why him rather that other siblings of Marduk in Gibil and Ninagal?  

Gibil and Ninagal were not that politically ambitious and were very far from the scene of the tug-of-war that was Egypt. Dumuzi on the other hand was based right in Egypt. Although he had never ruled Egypt as a whole, Enki had seen to it that he had a semi-autonomous enclave known as Meluhha, or Nubia, which encompassed today’s central Sudan and southern Egypt and where all Tswana-speaking people originate. Meluhha was not only one of the most fertile and richest parts of ancient Egypt but it was also well-endowed mineral-resourcewise.  Say the Sumerian chronicles: “In the Land of the Two Narrows (Egypt) for Dumuzi and the shepherds a habitation did Enki fashion. To Dumuzi, his youngest son, Enki a large domain above the Abzu allotted. Meluhha, the Black Land, was its name. Highland trees there grew, its waters abundant were. Large bulls among its river reeds roamed, greatly numbered were its cattle. Silver from its mountains came, its copper bright as gold was aglitter.”

Even more significant, Dumuzi and Inanna-Ishtar, Enlil’s granddaughter, were madly in love. Their love affair, which was initiated through the gallantry of the sex-crazy Inanna herself, is arguably the world’s first Romeo and Juliet affair and the inspiration to King Solomon’s Song of Solomon love canticles of the Old Testament. Solomon never had a devoted, sizzling love affair to write about: what you read in Song of Solomon was purloined from the Dumuzi-Inanna romance. The couple’s affair  blossomed when Horus was ruling Egypt (between 8970 and 8670 BC). When the war between Horus and Seth for the control of Egypt, where Inanna was known as Ashtoreth, was at feverpitch, Inanna fought at the battlefront on the side of Horus for the sake of Dumuzi, who was backing Horus in the confrontation.

What exactly attracted Inanna to Dumuzi? For starters, Dumuzi had a potent enough libido (primarily because he was young and therefore hot-blooded) to satisfy the seamless sex-craving of Inanna.  Dumuzi was also filthy rich, from both his pastoral exploits (the reason he was known as “The Herder” or “The Shepherd”) and his mineral wealth. But the reason that overrode all others was that Inanna wanted to use Dumuzi as a foil on Marduk’s ambitions and as the fulfiller of her own. 

It was  Dumuzi she wanted to take over as the  Enlil when the Age of Aries dawned at the expense of Marduk so that she could realise her age-old yearning to become the “Queen of Earth”. As for Dumuzi, he was smitten by Inanna because she was at once a stunning beauty, a courageous warrior, and a feared fistic fighting machine at just five-foot-five, a midget in Anunnaki terms.  “Beautiful beyond describing she was,” say the Sumerian tablets. “In martial arts with Anunnaki heroes she competed.”

INANNA AND DUMUZI TIE KNOT

Dumuzi and Inanna, who had an on-and-off relationship despite their fabled love affair, dated for almost 6000 years before they decided to tie the knot. Why did they take that long? Bear in mind that in Anunnaki terms, this was hardly a long time: it was just over one-and-half years. Of the duo, it was Inanna who prevailed over Dumuzi that it was time he led her to the altar. The timing on the part of Inanna was strategic. It was circa 3100 BC, when civilisation took effect in Egypt. Thus if Dumuzi was to ascend to the reins and Inanna was queen, the couple would preside over a country with enormous economic and technological potential.

Inanna was the first to inform her clan of the planned nuptials. Sin, her father, and Ningal, her mother, were ecstatic. Utu-Shamash, her twin brother, who had always nudged his sister in the direction of Dumuzi, gave her the thumbs-up to. As for Enlil, the Bible’s main Yahweh/Jehovah, the marriage was very politically apt. “Perchance the espousing peace between the clans truly will bring,” he reasoned as he gave the intended union the nod. The Enkites too were over the moon when Dumuzi broke the news to them. True, Inanna wasn’t a woman of particularly good standing morally: she was famed for her outrageously loose sexual morals.

What counted in her favour, however, was the fact that she carried a lot of political clout among the Enlilites. To give just one example, she had been promised rulership of the Indus Valley and so if she were to marry Dumuzi, it meant the Enkites would have considerable sway in an Enlilite sphere of influence. Moreover, as King Anu’s favourite female relation, she enjoyed his support, albeit qualified, and more often than not,  she got away with just about every transgression in the book  owing to this backing. Finally, there was the matter of cementing peace between the Enlilites and the Enkites, a factor that outweighed any other.   

At Dumuzi and Inanna’s engagement party, “a bethrothal bed of gold by Gibil was fashioned, Nergal blue-hued lapis stones sent”. As the two love flames prepared for the big day, Inanna seemed to make it clear to Dumuzi that their forthcoming marriage was as much about politics as it was about spontaneous mutual affection. Every time they made love, Inanna cooed her agenda for Egypt into Dumuzi’s ear whilst emphasising that  it was her who would be calling the shots. “Subdue the rebellious country, let the nation multiply,” she urged. “I will direct the country rightly”. When the wedding day arrived, Dumuzi’s half-sister Geshtinanna was her chaperone. As she touched and spruced her up, Inanna confided in her her designs on Egypt.

“A vision of a great nation I have, as a Great Anunnaki Dumuzi there will rise,” she gushed prospectively. “His name over others shall be exalted, his queen-spouse I shall be. Princely status we will share, rebellious countries we shall together subdue. To Dumuzi I will status give, the country I will rightly direct!”

Geshtinanna was disturbed upon hearing this. If Inanna persuaded Dumuzi to oust Marduk, what would prevent her from persuading him to do the same with Nergal and  other Enkites so that Dumuzi ended up the sole ruler of the vastly rich continent  of Africa? So it was that on the very day the wedding concluded, Geshtinanna took Marduk aside and divulged to him what Inanna had told her in confidence. Marduk, who initially had supported the idea of the marriage, now rued his folly. Did Inanna’s cunning know any bounds? And now that she had dug her hooks into Dumuzi,  could she ever be tamed?

 NEXT WEEK: MARDUK INDICTED FOR MURDER

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The Daring Dozen at Bari

8th December 2020
JEFF---Batswana-smoke-unit

Seventy-seven years ago, on the evening of December 2, 1943, the Germans launched a surprise air raid on allied shipping in the Italian port of Bari, which was then the key supply centre for the British 8th army’s advance in Italy.

The attack was spearheaded by 105 Junkers JU88 bombers under the overall command of the infamous Air Marshal Wolfram von Richthofen (who had initially achieved international notoriety during the Spanish Civil War for his aerial bombardment of Guernica). In a little over an hour the German aircraft succeeded in sinking 28 transport and cargo ships, while further inflicting massive damage to the harbour’s facilities, resulting in the port being effectively put out of action for two months.

Over two thousand ground personnel were killed during the raid, with the release of a secret supply of mustard gas aboard one of the destroyed ships contributing to the death toll, as well as subsequent military and civilian casualties. The extent of the later is a controversy due to the fact that the American and British governments subsequently covered up the presence of the gas for decades.

At least five Batswana were killed and seven critically wounded during the raid, with one of the wounded being miraculously rescued floating unconscious out to sea with a head wound. He had been given up for dead when he returned to his unit fourteen days later. The fatalities and casualties all occurred when the enemy hit an ammunition ship adjacent to where 24 Batswana members of the African Pioneer Corps (APC) 1979 Smoke Company where posted.

Thereafter, the dozen surviving members of the unit distinguished themselves for their efficiency in putting up and maintaining smokescreens in their sector, which was credited with saving additional shipping. For his personal heroism in rallying his men following the initial explosions Company Corporal Chitu Bakombi was awarded the British Empire Medal, while his superior officer, Lieutenant N.F. Moor was later given an M.B.E.

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A Strong Marriage Bond Needs Two

8th December 2020

Remember: bricks and cement are used to build a house, but mutual love, respect and companionship are used to build a HOME. And amongst His signs is this: He creates for you mates out of your own kind, so that you may find contentment (Sukoon) with them, and He engenders love and tenderness between you; in this behold, there are signs (messages) indeed for people who reflect and think (Quran 30:21).

This verse talks about contentment; this implies companionship, of their being together, sharing together, supporting one another and creating a home of peace. This verse also talks about love between them; this love is both physical and emotional. For love to exist it must be built on the foundation of a mutually supportive relationship guided by respect and tenderness. As the Quran says; ‘they are like garments for you, and you are garments for them (Quran 2:187)’. That means spouses should provide each other with comfort, intimacy and protection just as clothing protects, warms and dignifies the body.

In Islam marriage is considered an ‘ibaadah’, (an act of pleasing Allah) because it is about a commitment made to each other, that is built on mutual love, interdependence, integrity, trust, respect, companionship and harmony towards each other. It is about building of a home on an Islamic foundation in which peace and tranquillity reigns wherein your offspring are raised in an atmosphere conducive to a moral and upright upbringing so that when we all stand before Him (Allah) on that Promised Day, He will be pleased with them all.

Most marriages start out with great hopes and rosy dreams; spouses are truly committed to making their marriages work. However, as the pressures of life mount, many marriages change over time and it is quite common for some of them to run into problems and start to flounder as the reality of living with a spouse that does not meet with one’s pre-conceived ‘expectations’. However, with hard work and dedication, couples can keep their marriages strong and enjoyable. How is it done? What does it take to create a long-lasting, satisfying marriage?

Below are some of the points that have been taken from a marriage guidance article I read recently and adapted for this purposes.

POSITIVITY
Spouses should have far more positive than negative interactions. If there is too much negativity — criticizing, demanding, name-calling, holding grudges, etc. — the relationship will suffer. However, if there is never any negativity, it probably means that frustrations and grievances are not getting ‘air time’ and unresolved tension is accumulating inside one or both partners waiting to ‘explode’ one day.

“Let not some men among you laugh at others: it may be that the (latter) are better than the (former): nor let some women laugh at others: it may be that the (latter) are better than the (former): nor defame nor be sarcastic to each other, nor call each other by (offensive) nicknames.” (49:11)

We all have our individual faults though we may not see them nor want to admit to them but we will easily identify them in others. The key is balance between the two extremes and being supportive of one another. To foster positivity in a marriage that help make them stable and happy, being affectionate, truly listening to each other, taking joy in each other’s achievements and being playful are just a few examples of positive interactions.
Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) said: “The believers who show the most perfect faith are those who have the best character and the best of you are those who are best to their wives”

UNDERSTANDING

Another characteristic of happy marriages is empathy; understanding your spouses’ perspective by putting oneself in his or her shoes. By showing that understanding and identifying with your spouse is important for relationship satisfaction. Spouses are more likely to feel good about their marriage and if their partner expresses empathy towards them. Husbands and wives are more content in their relationships when they feel that their partners understand their thoughts and feelings.

Successful married couples grow with each other; it simply isn’t wise to put any person in charge of your happiness. You must be happy with yourself before anyone else can be.  You are responsible for your actions, your attitudes and your happiness. Your spouse just enhances those things in your life. Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) said: “Treat your women well and be kind to them for they are your partners and committed helpers.”

COMMITMENT

Successful marriages involve both spouses’ commitment to the relationship. The married couple should learn the art of compromise and this usually takes years. The largest parts of compromise are openness to the other’s point of view and good communication when differences arise.

When two people are truly dedicated to making their marriage work, despite the unavoidable challenges and obstacles that come, they are much more likely to have a relationship that lasts. Husbands and wives who only focus on themselves and their own desires are not as likely to find joy and satisfaction in their relationships.

ACCEPTANCE

Another basic need in a relationship is each partner wants to feel valued and respected. When people feel that their spouses truly accept them for who they are, they are usually more secure and confident in their relationships. Often, there is conflict in marriage because partners cannot accept the individual preferences of their spouses and try to demand change from one another. When one person tries to force change from another, he or she is usually met with resistance.

However, change is much more likely to occur when spouses respect differences and accept each other unconditionally. Basic acceptance is vital to a happy marriage. Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) said: “It is the generous (in character) who is good to women, and it is the wicked who insults them.”
“Overlook (any human faults) with gracious forgiveness.” (Quran 15:85)

COMPASSION, MUTUAL LOVE AND RESPECT

Other important components of successful marriages are love, compassion and respect for each other. The fact is, as time passes and life becomes increasingly complicated, the marriage is often stressed and suffers as a result. A happy and successful marriage is based on equality. When one or the other dominates strongly, intimacy is replaced by fear of displeasing.

It is all too easy for spouses to lose touch with each other and neglect the love and romance that once came so easily. It is vital that husbands and wives continue to cultivate love and respect for each other throughout their lives. If they do, it is highly likely that their relationships will remain happy and satisfying. Move beyond the fantasy and unrealistic expectations and realize that marriage is about making a conscious choice to love and care for your spouse-even when you do not feel like it.

Seldom can one love someone for whom we have no respect. This also means that we have to learn to overlook and forgive the mistakes of one’s partner. In other words write the good about your partner in stone and the bad in dust, so that when the wind comes it blows away the bad and only the good remains.

Paramount of all, marriage must be based on the teachings of the Noble Qur’an and the teachings and guidance of our Prophet Muhammad (PBUH). To grow spiritually in your marriage requires that you learn to be less selfish and more loving, even during times of conflict. A marriage needs love, support, tolerance, honesty, respect, humility, realistic expectations and a sense of humour to be successful.

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Chronic Joblessness: How to Help Curtail it

30th November 2020
Motswana woman

The past week or two has been a mixed grill of briefs in so far as the national employment picture is concerned. BDC just injected a further P64 million in Kromberg & Schubert, the automotive cable manufacturer and exporter, to help keep it afloat in the face of the COVID-19-engendered global economic apocalypse. The financial lifeline, which follows an earlier P36 million way back in 2017, hopefully guarantees the jobs of 2500, maybe for another year or two.

It was also reported that a bulb manufacturing company, which is two years old and is youth-led, is making waves in Selibe Phikwe. Called Bulb Word, it is the only bulb manufacturing operation in Botswana and employs 60 people. The figure is not insignificant in a town that had 5000 jobs offloaded in one fell swoop when BCL closed shop in 2016 under seemingly contrived circumstances, so that as I write, two or three buyers have submitted bids to acquire and exhume it from its stage-managed grave.

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