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Land of Firsts

Benson C Saili
THIS EARTH, MY BROTHER    

Sumer, the world’s best-known civilisation of old, blossoms as knowledge is lowered from “Heaven”

The 17th day of Anu’s visit to Earth was his departure day. On the morning of that day, Anu attended a prayer and thanksgiving service in the Unug-ki chapel, where blessings were requested of him. “Anu is leaving,” the priests chanted. “Anu King of Heaven and Earth, we ask for your blessings.” The Anunnaki then one by one ascended to the pulpit for Anu to lay hands on them and pronounce blessings.

The very last, by deliberate design, was Inanna. Inanna was in for the treat of her life. Anu not only made her his official mistress on Earth for as long as she was single but presented her his personal plane and gave her the keys to Unug-ki. “Anu to his great-granddaughter Inanna took a liking,” the Sumerian records say. “He drew her closely, he hugged and kissed her. ‘Let all my words heed!’ to the congregated he announced. ‘This place, after we leave, to Inanna as a dowry is given. Let the skyship in which we the Earth surveyed to Inanna my present be!’”

Inanna was over the moon. “To dance and sing began, her praises of Anu as hymns in times to come were chanted.” It was at this stage that she was renamed Inanna, “Beloved of Anu”: prior to that, she had been known as Irnini. The farewell service having been concluded, Anu was escorted down the “Street of the Gods” to the “Place of the Barque of Anu”. There, in another chapel called “Build Life on Earth”, the Anunnaki chanted blessings for him. The King  was then flown to the spaceport at Tilmun. On the steps of his rocket, he had one final appeal to Enlil and Enki. “Whatever Destiny  for the Earth and the Earthlings intended, let it be so,” he underlined. “If Man, not Anunnaki to Earth inherit is destined, let us destiny help.” The King then hugged, embraced, and kissed his two sons, got aboard the spaceship, and was off to “Heaven” as Nibiru was then known.  

A SUDDEN, REVIVALIST BURST OF KNOWLEDGE

GENESIS 10:10:  And the beginning of his kingdom was Babel and Erech and Accad and Calneh in the land of Shinar … GENESIS 11:2:  And it came to pass as they journeyed from the east that they found a plain in the land of Shinar; and they dwelt there …

Shinar (Sinar in Hebrew) is the Old Testament term for Sumer. Sumer is the English corruption of “Shumer”. Shumer is an Akkadian term, Akkadian being the parent language of Hebrew, the language of the Jewish people. Shumer (from Shem-Ur) means “Land of the Bright Ones”; “Land of the Shining Ones”; “Land of the Guardians”;  “Land of the Watchers”; or
“Land of the Rocket People”. In other words, Sumer was the land of the Anunnaki – the “Lords of Brightness” – who travelled in “celestial chariots” (rockets) and who watched and lorded over mankind, the species they had created by way of genetic engineering about 300,000 years ago.    

However, the Sumerians did not call their land Shumer. They called it Kiengir, which means “Land of the Lords of the Blazing Rockets” – the name King Anu had conferred.  The Sumerians referred to themselves as Ugsaggigga, meaning   "The Black-Headed People". That way, they distinguished themselves from people they called the Dingir, or the “Righteous Ones Of The Rockets” – the Anunnaki.  The Dingir were multi-racial but the majority as well as the ruling class were very light-skinned, almost albino-like; blue-eyed in the main; and predominantly blonde-haired.

Sumer was the first place the Anunnaki settled in when they came to Earth about 450,000 years ago. At the time, they called it Edin, the biblical Eden. The Edin was destroyed in the Deluge of Noah’s day and was reconstructed 6000 Years ago, when it became known as Sumer/Kiengir. Sumer was designated as the crucible for mankind’s civilisation at the suggestion of Enki and at the decree of Nibiru King Anu, “Our Father Who Art In Heaven” when he visited Earth in 3800 BC. It is the world’s best-documented civilisation of antiquity, which arose in southern Mesopotamia in ancient Iraq astride the iconic rivers Euphrates and Tigris.  

The Sumerian civilisation was not gradual but abrupt: in terms of the normal, gradualistic   pace of history, it took place in the twinkling of an eye. Historians and scholars have called it “astonishing”; “extraordinary”; “a flame which blazed up so suddenly”. Leo Oppenheimer, author of Ancient Mesopotamia, stressed “the astonishing short period within which this civilisation arose”. 

Joseph Campbell, in his book The Masks of God, summed it up thus: “With stunning abruptness … there appears in this little Sumerian mud garden … the whole cultural syndrome that has since constituted the germinal unit of all the high civilisation of the world.” Well, the sudden dawn of the Sumerian civilisation was such because it was effected expeditiously by a people who were capable of doing so – the already surpassingly civilised Anunnaki. They handed civilisation to mankind as an already complete package: we didn’t have to evolve with this knowledge over millions of years as per the normal evolutionary process.

THE INFRASTRUCTURE TAKES SHAPE

Sumer was built by mankind with the supervision of either the Anunnaki themselves, who did the schematic and architectural planning, or the so-called demigods – Earthlings who had between half to two-thirds of royal Anunnaki blood in them.  The demigods, from whom Earthling kings were chosen (that’s how bogosi began – with people who had substantial Anunnaki blood [the so-called Bluebloods] coursing in their veins, were the first to receive enlightenment. They in turn passed on this knowledge to the wider mass of Earthlings through the academic and vocational training system, initially using Sumerian and subsequently Akkadian, the forerunner to the Hebrew language, as the lingua franca.

The entire infrastructural erection – palaces, temples, houses, stables, warehouses, walls, gates, columns, decorations, statues, artworks, towers, ramparts, terraces, gardens – was done in the space of only five years. All the streets and promenades were paved. For instance, Uruk, Ninurta’s cult city, was paved with “limestone blocks brought from mountains fifty miles to the East.” All the bricks were made of clay, which was also the fundamental raw material in the manufacture of utensils for daily use and things we today make using steel – containers for storage and transportation of goods.  

Sumerian Earthling cities are said to have been splendidly organised. They had a central government, a municipal bureaucracy, and a social stratification, sadly, akin to what we have today – the haves and the have-nots, the nobility and the commoners, the bourgeois and the proletariat, the blue collar and white collar. But the cities were much smaller than modern ones: each was populated by between 10,000 to 50,000 people.  The bulk of mankind, who now were mistrusting of the Anunnaki in light of what transpired during the Deluge, preferred to live in rural settings far removed from the metropolises and where they would be masters of their own destiny.  

The principal occupation of the Sumerians was agriculture. Sumer, also known as Mesopotamia – the Land Between The Two Rivers (Tigris and Euphrates) – was the global food basket of the day. Most of the Sumerians worked in the agricultural field: only few were in business or the professions. Others served the Anunnaki in their temple-houses. Not only did they cook, clean, launder and maintain surroundings for the Anunnaki royalty but they also worshipped them as gods. Observes one chronicler: “The Anunnaki turned Earthlings’ palace-servant duties into religious rituals that persist to this day. Serving meats on the Anunnaki table became burnt offerings. The table became an altar. The transportation of the local Anunnaki ruler on a dais became a procession of statues. The Anunnaki palaces became temples.”

Sumer was also known for the transportation,  ship-building, and the metals trade, the latter of which gave rise to banking and the world’s first currency –the silver shekel. The shipping industry was in full bloom, with special-purpose ships for passengers, cargo, or goods which required exclusive transportation. As regards overland transport, the newly invented wheel facilitated the emergence of carts and chariots which used the so-called ox-power or horse power for locomotion.

But one of Sumer’s earliest outstanding feat was the development of the textile and clothing industry. Long before   James Hargreaves invented the "spinning jenny”, a device which allowed one person to spin many threads at once, to kick-start the Industrial Revolution in 1764, Sumer was famed for its woolen fabrics and its apparel. The basic garment was known as the Tugtushe,  meaning “garment which is worn wrapped around”, like a toga. The garments of Sumer were so highly prized that once during the Israelites storming  of the city of Jericho, a soldier risked a death penalty when he appropriated to himself “one good coat of Shinar” as per the book of JOSHUA 7:21.

LEARNING AND RECORD KEEPING

What were some of the Sumerian “firsts”? They include the wheel and wheeled transportation; the brick and high-rise buildings; the furnaces and kilns essential to industries from baking to metallurgy; astronomy, astrology, and mathematics; medicine; cities and urban societies; kingship and systems of law; the bicameral parliament; temples and priesthoods; timekeeping; the calendar; music and music instruments; the first money in the form of the silver shekel; and above all writing and record keeping.

Much of the saga of the Anunnaki we have been writing about in this column series was first recorded 6,000 years ago by the scribes of Sumer.  They used monuments, artifacts, foundation stones, bricks, utensils, etc, as inviting slates on which to write down and record events. Above all,   they used clay tablets and cylinder seals. The clay tablets number in tens of thousands (over 30,000 were unearthed at the site of the ancient city of Nippur alone) and have been found in ancient centres of commerce or of administration, temple palaces, and libraries dug up by archaeologists over the years.

It was the Sumerians who were the first to record and describe events and tell the tales of the “gods” – the Anunnaki. We are only just beginning to know about the planet Nibiru, and we began to get acquainted with the geophysical and geographical features of other planets of the Solar System only in the last third of the 20th century, but the Sumerians knew precious much about all of this, including how the Earth came to be – a subject about which astrophycists are still scratching their “terrifically” learned heads. 

“The true treasures of these (Sumerian) kingdoms were their written records,” writes Zechariah Sitchin. “ (There were) thousands upon thousands of inscriptions in the cuneiform script, including cosmologic tales, epic poems, histories of kings, temple records, commercial contracts, marriage and divorce records, astronomical tables, astrological forecasts, mathematical formulas, geographic lists, grammar and vocabulary school texts, and, not least of all, texts dealing with the names, genealogies, epithets, deeds, powers, and duties of the gods.”

The school curriculum was thorough and meticulous. It taught “not only language and writing but also the sciences of the day – botany, zoology, geography, mathematics, and theology. Literary works of the past were studied and copied, and new ones were composed. Discipline was scrupulously and rigorously enforced. There is a record of one school alumnus who was severely flogged for “missing school, for insufficient neatness, for loitering, for not keeping silent, for misbehaving, and even for not having neat handwriting”.

Modern day mathematics is based on the decimal system, the ratio 10:1, also called Base 10. The Base 10 cue was provided by the number of our bodily digits – 10 toes, 10 fingers. On the other hand, Sumerian mathematics was based on the number 60 and so was called the sexagesimal system. Why and how? According to Sumerian knowledge passed to us, mathematics on the planet Nibiru was based on the number 6 because the Nibiruians were born with 6 toes and fingers on each hand and foot respectively (Nibiruian males were also born with a penis that did not have a foreskin – already circumcised by nature! Now we can understand why Enlil – the Bible’s Jehovah – wanted his chosen people, the Hebrews, to be circumcised, that is, to be like their god!)

To reconcile Nibiruian mathematics with Earthly mathematics, the Anunnaki came up with a ratio of 3,600, which was the number of years it took for their planet to revolve around the Sun, and 2,160, which was the number of years it took for people on Earth to experience one age of a uniform star pattern in the night skies, also called a zodiac (Leo, Taurus, Pisces, etc). Thus, 3600:2160 came down to 10:6, or simply Base 60. The 360 degree cycle, the foot and its twelve inches, and the dozen are all aspects of mathematics that hark back to Sumerian sexagesimal mathematics, which was instituted by the phenomenally advanced Anunnaki. There was also a time when a year was 360 days long as opposed to today’s 365 days.
“We were taught all that we know by the Anunnaki,” the Sumerians keep reminding us in their cuneiform clay tablets.   

SUMERIAN MEDICINE

If Sumer wasn’t that endowed with mineral ores, it had fuels galore. It was the ancient world’s primary source of petroleum products, a status it maintained all the way to the Roman era (1st to 5th century AD).  The oil simply oozed out of the ground naturally, as in today’s Kuwait, which incidentally was part of Sumer. Petroleum products were an integral part of Sumerian medicine too, as was water, plants and vegetables (herbal products), and mineral compounds.  Intriguingly, Sumerian medicine was not simply about therapy and surgery: it also involved simple vocalisation – healing by the utterance of commands (probably similar to what the “prophets” of our day do?) and incantations.   Unfortunately, the latter method is not used at all in modern hospitals when it is astonishingly effective when practiced as an art form, particularly in ailments that are inflicted “supernaturally” by dark forces.

Some medicinal powders were taken orally not only with water but in mixtures with honey, wine, and even beer. In our day, doctors who prescribe medication that includes alcohol are non-existent but in Sumerian times, they were the norm rather than the exception (I’m sure my friend Mashele Ishos would love such a doctor!).  And medicine was not administered only through the mouth: there was also rectal medicine, which was poured through the rectum  in the form of plant or vegetable oils. Again this is unheard of in these times of ours which are dominated by  Western medicine but in African medicine it is still in vogue: as kids, my own late maternal grandmother Malia used to administer rectal oils to us when we were afflicted with chronic diarrhea and with speedy results.

In the Sumerian records, we read of “water physicians (doctors who specialised in healing with water only, an echo of the “Holy Water” that is so fashionable today in evangelical circles)”, “oil physicians (doctors who specialised in healing with oils only [anointed oil as in evangelical churches?])”, “veterinarians”, etc.  All sorts of surgeries were performed, including brain surgery. One medical text talks of a surgery involving the “removal of a shadow covering somebody’s eye,” which sounds like a cataract operation. There are numerous depictions of patients lying on what appear to be a surgical table with a team of masked Anunnaki and human doctors all around. On one cylinder seal is a drawing of a pair of surgical tongs against a backdrop of a serpent coiled around a tree, suggesting that the serpent has been the symbol of medicine since days immemorial.

JUSTICE AND THE LEGISLATURE

The first system of laws and the first parliament arose in Sumer. The laws were remarkably just and equitable and profoundly pro-poor. There were laws, for instance, that put a cap on the prices of essential commodities and on the rental of wagons and boats so that the poor were not unduly exploited. There were laws that formed the framework of master-servant relationships. All forms of oppression, exploitation, and extortion were spelt out as “evil” in the statutes.

The laws aimed at  stopping and punishing "the grabbers-of the citizens' oxen, sheep, and donkeys" so that "the orphan shall not fall prey to the wealthy, the widow shall not fall prey to the powerful, the man of one shekel shall not fall prey to a man of 60 shekels." Early law codes included sections dealing with fees payable to surgeons for successful operations, and Shariah-like penalties to be imposed on them in case of botched operations. For instance, a surgeon using a lancet to open a patient's temple was to lose his hand if he accidentally destroyed the patient's eye!

The courts were presided over by a professional judge from the royal establishment; three lay judges; and thirty-three members of a jury. The Sumerian parliament was two-tier, like that of Britain and the US, where you have the House of Lords and the House of Commons, and the Senate and the House of Representatives respectively. A story is told of how Gilgamesh, the King of Uruk,  wished to go to war with Kish. As powerful as he was, he needed parliament to sanction the war. He first brought up the matter before the Assembly of the Elders, who voted against war. But when he tabled the same matter in the Assembly of the Fighting Men, it was a foregone conclusion: they overwhelmingly voted for war.    

 
NEXT WEEK: MARDUK FOUNDS BABYLON

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The Daring Dozen at Bari

8th December 2020
JEFF---Batswana-smoke-unit

Seventy-seven years ago, on the evening of December 2, 1943, the Germans launched a surprise air raid on allied shipping in the Italian port of Bari, which was then the key supply centre for the British 8th army’s advance in Italy.

The attack was spearheaded by 105 Junkers JU88 bombers under the overall command of the infamous Air Marshal Wolfram von Richthofen (who had initially achieved international notoriety during the Spanish Civil War for his aerial bombardment of Guernica). In a little over an hour the German aircraft succeeded in sinking 28 transport and cargo ships, while further inflicting massive damage to the harbour’s facilities, resulting in the port being effectively put out of action for two months.

Over two thousand ground personnel were killed during the raid, with the release of a secret supply of mustard gas aboard one of the destroyed ships contributing to the death toll, as well as subsequent military and civilian casualties. The extent of the later is a controversy due to the fact that the American and British governments subsequently covered up the presence of the gas for decades.

At least five Batswana were killed and seven critically wounded during the raid, with one of the wounded being miraculously rescued floating unconscious out to sea with a head wound. He had been given up for dead when he returned to his unit fourteen days later. The fatalities and casualties all occurred when the enemy hit an ammunition ship adjacent to where 24 Batswana members of the African Pioneer Corps (APC) 1979 Smoke Company where posted.

Thereafter, the dozen surviving members of the unit distinguished themselves for their efficiency in putting up and maintaining smokescreens in their sector, which was credited with saving additional shipping. For his personal heroism in rallying his men following the initial explosions Company Corporal Chitu Bakombi was awarded the British Empire Medal, while his superior officer, Lieutenant N.F. Moor was later given an M.B.E.

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A Strong Marriage Bond Needs Two

8th December 2020

Remember: bricks and cement are used to build a house, but mutual love, respect and companionship are used to build a HOME. And amongst His signs is this: He creates for you mates out of your own kind, so that you may find contentment (Sukoon) with them, and He engenders love and tenderness between you; in this behold, there are signs (messages) indeed for people who reflect and think (Quran 30:21).

This verse talks about contentment; this implies companionship, of their being together, sharing together, supporting one another and creating a home of peace. This verse also talks about love between them; this love is both physical and emotional. For love to exist it must be built on the foundation of a mutually supportive relationship guided by respect and tenderness. As the Quran says; ‘they are like garments for you, and you are garments for them (Quran 2:187)’. That means spouses should provide each other with comfort, intimacy and protection just as clothing protects, warms and dignifies the body.

In Islam marriage is considered an ‘ibaadah’, (an act of pleasing Allah) because it is about a commitment made to each other, that is built on mutual love, interdependence, integrity, trust, respect, companionship and harmony towards each other. It is about building of a home on an Islamic foundation in which peace and tranquillity reigns wherein your offspring are raised in an atmosphere conducive to a moral and upright upbringing so that when we all stand before Him (Allah) on that Promised Day, He will be pleased with them all.

Most marriages start out with great hopes and rosy dreams; spouses are truly committed to making their marriages work. However, as the pressures of life mount, many marriages change over time and it is quite common for some of them to run into problems and start to flounder as the reality of living with a spouse that does not meet with one’s pre-conceived ‘expectations’. However, with hard work and dedication, couples can keep their marriages strong and enjoyable. How is it done? What does it take to create a long-lasting, satisfying marriage?

Below are some of the points that have been taken from a marriage guidance article I read recently and adapted for this purposes.

POSITIVITY
Spouses should have far more positive than negative interactions. If there is too much negativity — criticizing, demanding, name-calling, holding grudges, etc. — the relationship will suffer. However, if there is never any negativity, it probably means that frustrations and grievances are not getting ‘air time’ and unresolved tension is accumulating inside one or both partners waiting to ‘explode’ one day.

“Let not some men among you laugh at others: it may be that the (latter) are better than the (former): nor let some women laugh at others: it may be that the (latter) are better than the (former): nor defame nor be sarcastic to each other, nor call each other by (offensive) nicknames.” (49:11)

We all have our individual faults though we may not see them nor want to admit to them but we will easily identify them in others. The key is balance between the two extremes and being supportive of one another. To foster positivity in a marriage that help make them stable and happy, being affectionate, truly listening to each other, taking joy in each other’s achievements and being playful are just a few examples of positive interactions.
Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) said: “The believers who show the most perfect faith are those who have the best character and the best of you are those who are best to their wives”

UNDERSTANDING

Another characteristic of happy marriages is empathy; understanding your spouses’ perspective by putting oneself in his or her shoes. By showing that understanding and identifying with your spouse is important for relationship satisfaction. Spouses are more likely to feel good about their marriage and if their partner expresses empathy towards them. Husbands and wives are more content in their relationships when they feel that their partners understand their thoughts and feelings.

Successful married couples grow with each other; it simply isn’t wise to put any person in charge of your happiness. You must be happy with yourself before anyone else can be.  You are responsible for your actions, your attitudes and your happiness. Your spouse just enhances those things in your life. Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) said: “Treat your women well and be kind to them for they are your partners and committed helpers.”

COMMITMENT

Successful marriages involve both spouses’ commitment to the relationship. The married couple should learn the art of compromise and this usually takes years. The largest parts of compromise are openness to the other’s point of view and good communication when differences arise.

When two people are truly dedicated to making their marriage work, despite the unavoidable challenges and obstacles that come, they are much more likely to have a relationship that lasts. Husbands and wives who only focus on themselves and their own desires are not as likely to find joy and satisfaction in their relationships.

ACCEPTANCE

Another basic need in a relationship is each partner wants to feel valued and respected. When people feel that their spouses truly accept them for who they are, they are usually more secure and confident in their relationships. Often, there is conflict in marriage because partners cannot accept the individual preferences of their spouses and try to demand change from one another. When one person tries to force change from another, he or she is usually met with resistance.

However, change is much more likely to occur when spouses respect differences and accept each other unconditionally. Basic acceptance is vital to a happy marriage. Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) said: “It is the generous (in character) who is good to women, and it is the wicked who insults them.”
“Overlook (any human faults) with gracious forgiveness.” (Quran 15:85)

COMPASSION, MUTUAL LOVE AND RESPECT

Other important components of successful marriages are love, compassion and respect for each other. The fact is, as time passes and life becomes increasingly complicated, the marriage is often stressed and suffers as a result. A happy and successful marriage is based on equality. When one or the other dominates strongly, intimacy is replaced by fear of displeasing.

It is all too easy for spouses to lose touch with each other and neglect the love and romance that once came so easily. It is vital that husbands and wives continue to cultivate love and respect for each other throughout their lives. If they do, it is highly likely that their relationships will remain happy and satisfying. Move beyond the fantasy and unrealistic expectations and realize that marriage is about making a conscious choice to love and care for your spouse-even when you do not feel like it.

Seldom can one love someone for whom we have no respect. This also means that we have to learn to overlook and forgive the mistakes of one’s partner. In other words write the good about your partner in stone and the bad in dust, so that when the wind comes it blows away the bad and only the good remains.

Paramount of all, marriage must be based on the teachings of the Noble Qur’an and the teachings and guidance of our Prophet Muhammad (PBUH). To grow spiritually in your marriage requires that you learn to be less selfish and more loving, even during times of conflict. A marriage needs love, support, tolerance, honesty, respect, humility, realistic expectations and a sense of humour to be successful.

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Chronic Joblessness: How to Help Curtail it

30th November 2020
Motswana woman

The past week or two has been a mixed grill of briefs in so far as the national employment picture is concerned. BDC just injected a further P64 million in Kromberg & Schubert, the automotive cable manufacturer and exporter, to help keep it afloat in the face of the COVID-19-engendered global economic apocalypse. The financial lifeline, which follows an earlier P36 million way back in 2017, hopefully guarantees the jobs of 2500, maybe for another year or two.

It was also reported that a bulb manufacturing company, which is two years old and is youth-led, is making waves in Selibe Phikwe. Called Bulb Word, it is the only bulb manufacturing operation in Botswana and employs 60 people. The figure is not insignificant in a town that had 5000 jobs offloaded in one fell swoop when BCL closed shop in 2016 under seemingly contrived circumstances, so that as I write, two or three buyers have submitted bids to acquire and exhume it from its stage-managed grave.

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