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Jehovah “Sins” Against Heir

Benson C Saili
THIS EARTH, MY BROTHER                                                     
 

Triumphant Ninurta rendered subordinate to younger brother in Enlil’s strategic top-level shuffle


The terms of the peace consequent to the Second Pyramid War in which the Enkites and Enlilites clashed and the latter were victorious were announced by peace broker Ninmah to the rest of the Anunnaki royalty who had not been party to the proceedings in an adjoining hall in Ninmah’s abode at the Harsag.
 

The moment Ninmah made the announcement, Inanna-Ishtar, Enlil’s granddaughter and  daughter to Nannar-Sin, his second-born son, kicked up an angry fuss and made a scene like the Jezebel she was. Inanna was furious that the rulership of Egypt had been given to Ningishzidda. As far as she was concerned, Dumuzi, Enki’s youngest son, was the best fit in that he had played no part whatsoever in the war whereas Zidda had.

But central to her rooting for Dumuzi was the fact that she had a crush on him and like the nymphomaniac she was was already hitting on him not only to satiate her sex craze but to hitch him into wedlock. Sadly, the peace was a fait accompli and there was nothing Ninmah could do to alter the status quo in Inanna’s favour. Once the Enkites had departed, Enlil, the Bible’s central Jehovah, and his clan flew to Jerusalem for another meeting. This was about the redistribution of Enlilite lands in the new, post-war dispensation. Also present at the meeting was Ninmah; Enlil’s wife Ninlil; and Sin’s wife Ningal.
 

In the revised allocations, Ishkur-Adad, the third-born, retained  today’s Lebanon, which incorporated the strategically significant Baalbek, the Landing Place for terrestrial aviational craft. Utu-Shamash, Inanna’s twin brother and who pre-war had been commander of Tilmun under the overall aegis of Ninmah, was entrusted charge of Mission Control Centre at Jerusalem.
 

As for the Sinai Peninsula, where Tilmun, the spaceport, was sited, and the rest of Canaan, Sin fiercely crossed verbal swords with Ninurta. As Enlil’s legal heir, Ninurta argued that it was he was automatically entitled to the role of administrator of the Anunnaki’s most prized region of the planet. In this view, he was supported by his mother Ninmah, who was Enlil’s half-sister. In a bid to favourably dispose Enlil toward her son, Ninmah rhapsodised on how she and Enlil bumped and ground relentlessly to produce a heir in Ninurta. So desperate in her pleas was she that she even requested that Enki be invited to the meeting to proffer his characteristic wise take on the matter, a suggestion Enlil utterly rejected.
 

 Sin’s pitch was equally spirited. He pointed out to Enlil that whilst Ninurta was Enlil’s heir on Nibiru, he wasn’t here on Earth. Ninurta was born on Nibiru whereas Sin was born on Earth, the first such Anunnaki. As such, Sin had a legitimate claim to inheriting after Enlil here on Earth and to administrating Canaan and Tilmun as he was a son of the soil unlike Ninurta who was to all intents and purposes a foreigner in the eyes of Earthlings. On their part, Ninlil and Ningal urged Enlil to “listen to your heart and not your mind”.  Would Enlil heed them?

 

JEHOVAH DEMOTES HIS FIRSTBORN SON

 

After pondering the matter over, Enlil responded that with rulership of Earth now alternating between the Enlilites and Enkites thanks to the Galzu dictum, the idea of a heir to Enlil here on Earth was essentially redundant as there no longer would be permanence in the title. That said, Enlil settled for Sin, “a Firstborn (with respect to Earth) of beautiful countenance, perfect of limbs, wise without compare”, as the new ruler of Greater Canaan and Tilmun. Greater Canaan extended from  the border of Egypt in the south to the border of Adad in the north, with  modern Syria included.

The whole of this area was dominated by Canaanites, who were pro-Marduk and impassionedly  anti-Ninurta for his callous and barbarous prosecution of the Second Pyramid War. Needless to say, the Canaanites were bound to warm more to Sin, who had played no part at all in the war. It was at this stage that the Sinai Peninsula was named as such – after Sin. The Sinai Peninsula’s well-watered place known as Nakhl was  named after Sin’s wife Ningal, the Semitic rendition of whose name is Nikhal. Ninurta, however, was not left in the lurch: he got the “Olden Lands”, that is, the new Edin, which in time came to be known as Sumer. This is modern-day Iraq predominantly. 

 

As for Inanna, she received no fief whatsoever and for that she threw up a tantrum, shouting, cursing, insulting,  kicking, and screaming. She wondered aloud why she had been denied a domain when she had been instrumental  in the defeat of the Enkites. “Against Marduk the war I  led (an exaggeration as the Enlilite commander was Ninurta),” she raved. She swore she was going to give the Enlilites a real nightmare if she wasn’t allocated a domain of her own and might even switch over to the Enkites.


Inanna had long been promised the Indus Valley but that promise had not yet materialised. Enlil’s pleas that she bides her time fell on stone-deaf  ears. Thus alarmed by Inanna’s threats, Enlil cabled Nibiru requesting King Anu to come to Earth and tame this tigress. “To Earth come,” Enlil entreated his father. “Deal with Inanna.”

 

“MIGHTY” NINURTA STRIPS THE GIZA PYRAMID

 

Meanwhile, Ninurta was the toast of the tribe of Shem, who were the Enlilite herd. He was eulogised in both written and pictorial chronicles like Alexander the Great. One such praise-poem went thus: “Ninurta Foremost Possessor of Divine Powers … Hero in whose hand the Divine Brilliant Weapon carries. Lord, the Mountainland (Giza Pyramid) you subdued as your creature … Hero, in fear of thee the city (in which the Giza Pyramid was located) has surrendered. O Mighty One, the Great Serpent (Marduk) the heroic god you tore away from the mountains (Giza) … Like Anu art thou made.” Ninurta’s defeat of the Enkites was marked with the investiture of a new emblem in his honour – “a Divine Bird within a rich wreath, soaring in triumph above the two great pyramids.”


Yet General Ninurta was far from done. His final nail-in-the-coffin act was to enter the Giza Pyramid under the guidance of the “Chief Mineral Master” to inspect and either confiscate or destroy any installation or instruments the Enkites could fall back on in a possible future war with the Enlilites. “As he stopped by each one of them,” writes Zechariah Sitchin in The War of the Gods, “he determined its destiny – to be smashed and destroyed, to be taken away for display, or to be installed as instruments elsewhere.”


The Giza Pyramid was a high-tech labyrinth. Its passages and chambers were arrayed with “the magical stones – minerals and crystals, some earthly, some heavenly (i.e. sourced from other planets), some the likes of which Ninurta had never seen. From them were emitted the beamed pulsations for the guidance of the astronauts and the radiations for the defence of the structure.”


Exploring the Enkites’ astronomical guidance systems and secret weapons stash, Ninurta found “all the MEs, the technology and Hermetic science operating the Bond-Heaven-Earth, a computer loaded with astronomical data and a programme to scan the sky and the Solar System, the technology of a control tower for inter-planetary travels to scan and calculate trajections, as well as the means to communicate with Anu and Nibiru.” In other words, the Enkites had their own clandestine Mission Control Centre courtesy of Enki’s genius: they didn’t need the official Mission Control Centre that was housed at Jerusalem!


In a large chamber for some reasons called “The Vulva” was found the Destiny Stone – a device that held calculus and astronomical programmes as well as the power to track individuals with a “Killing Ray”. The Destiny  Stone was the very nerve centre of Giza, the pyramid’s emitting source, where Hydrochloric Acid and hydrated potassium amplified the microwave from the pumped pool beneath  the pyramid. “But it (the Destiny Stone) was anathema to Ninurta, for during the battle,
when he was aloft, this stone’s strong  power was used to ‘attempt to grab me, with a tracking which kills to seize me’.”  Needless to say, Ninurta gave orders for the Destiny Stone to be disassembled and pulverised.


In the pyramid’s most “sacred” chamber was located a “Guiding Net”, possibly a radar which “spread out to survey Heaven (the skies) and Earth”. This radar was operationalised by the Gug, a Direction Determining Stone. Ninurta had the Gug and the three stones that underpinned it destroyed.  “Now came the turn of the universal stones and crystals positioned atop the ramps in the Grand Gallery.” These were 27 in number. “Several of them Ninurta ordered to be pulverised … Others, which could be used in the Mission Control Centre at Jerusalem,  were given to Shamash, and the rest were carried off to Mesopotamia to be deployed in Ninurta’s temple in Nippur and elsewhere as evidence of the great victory of the Enlilites over  the Enkites.”


At long last came the Apex Stone of the Pyramid. “Let the mothers’ offspring see it no more,” Ninurta bellowed before it was sent crashing to the ground. “Let the fear of thee (Giza) be removed from my descendants. Let their peace be ordained.” What boggles the mind is that if the Enkites were so phenomenally equipped, how come they lost the war in such an ignominious fashion? Well, it all was the decision of the peace-loving Enki. Enki wanted the war to end at any cost and not allow the Anunnaki to extinct each other on Earth. Marduk actually never forgave his father for so meekly getting the Enkites to yield to the Enlilites. Had Marduk had his way, you would be reading of a radically different outcome of the Second Pyramid War.  The Enlilites did not win the war: the Enkites chose to lose it.

 

THE ICONIC SUMER EMERGES

 

Since the Giza Pyramid was rendered basically useless by Enlilite general Ninurta, Ningishzidda, the new King of Egypt, decided to build a new Beacon City just north of Giza.  He named it City of Annu in honour of his grandfather the Nibiru King. The Greeks would in future call it Heliopolis – the same name they gave to Baalbek – meaning “City of the Sun God” – to venerate not King Anu but Utu-Shamash. To replace the Gug stone Ninurta had destroyed, Zidda built at Heliopolis  the now ubiquitous obelisks – towering, four-sided, narrow tapering monuments which ended up in a pyramid-like shape or pyramidion at the top – to serve as beacons. 
 

Meanwhile, the reconstruction of Sumer, the new Eden, was in progress. The first to arise was Eridu, Enki’s cult city. It was given priority because Enki was pivotal to the viability of the new Eden.  In the midst of Eridu,  Enki built a spectacular mansion adorned with gold, silver, and precious stones. And in keeping with his epithet as Oannes the Fish God, he had a cluster of ponds in which all kinds of fishes – some for food, others for the purposes of research – swam cheerily.


Next was Nippur, the city of Enlil. Nippur had been the Mission Control Centre before the Deluge but this time around it had been superseded by Jerusalem (Ur-Shulim in Sumerian, meaning “The Supreme Place of the Four Regions”, these being Africa, Indo-Europe, the Middle East, and Tilmun in the Sinai Peninsula), the new “Navel of the Earth”. When Nippur was rebuilt, Enlil relocated there from Jerusalem, which was now overseen by Shamash, and lived in a heavily fortified, seven-stage   “Mountain House” called a ziggurat.

The fortress was equipped with weapons and surveillance equipment such as “The Lifted Eye Which Scans The Land” and “The Lifted Beam Which Penetrates All”. On a platform on the roof of the ziggurat was “The Fast-Stepping Bird Whose Grasp No One Could Escape”, a sophisticated aircraft. This time around, the Enlilites were not taking chances given the sudden and unheralded manner in which they had been set upon and consequently lost the space-related sites to the Enkites.


When Lagash was rebuilt, it was allotted to Ninurta as his cult city. Ninurta, who was the overall ruler of Sumer (though nobody cared a damn about that anyway)  wasted no time in erecting there a magnificent Temple-House he called the Eninnu, meaning “House of Fifty” where he lived with his aunt-wife Bau. Although he was for all practical purposes now subordinate to his younger brother Sin in realpolitik, he wanted to make a defiant statement – that he still was very much in contention as Enlil’s real heir. If you recall, he too had been given the Anunnaki rank of 50, the same as Enlil but in a shadow capacity in his (Ninurta) case, after he vanquished “The Evil Zu” to underline the fact that he was next in line. In the Eninnu backyard was parked his famous “Black Skybird” (a plane) known as the Girsu, hence his other name Ningirsu.


The rebuilt Sippar was the fiefdom of Shamash: there, he dwelt in the Ebabbar (the “Shining House”) with his spouse Aya and enacted statues of justice for mankind (Shamash was also at once head of Mission Control Centre in Jerusalem and executive commander of the spaceport as both these were located in Canaan, where his father Sin had overall jurisdiction). At a new site called Adab not very far from the prediluvial Shuruppak, a new medical centre to be run by Ninmah was established.

There, Ninmah built her temple-abode she called “House of Succour and Healing Knowledge”. Sin’s new cult city was called Urim (Ur), “a city with straight streets, canals, and wharves”.  Perhaps as a dig at his elder brother Ninurta, he named his temple-mansion “House of the Throne's Seed”, which paraphrased meant heir to Enlil. Adad did not set up in Sumer but in his favourite Lebanon. He called his mansion “House of Seven Storms” as he was known as the Storm God and was a son of the great Enlil whose lucky number was 7. Sadly, Marduk was not allowed to set up his own cult city in Sumer. In fact, he and his son Nabu were restricted to Eridu every time they visited.


Soon mankind was teeming in Sumer in the urban centres of the gods, not as Anunnaki equals but as the worker race – the exact purpose for which he was created. His role was to “tend the surrounding fields, orchards, and cattlefolds in behalf of the gods, and to be in the service of the gods in all conceivable manners: not only as cooks and bakers, artisans and clothiers, but also as priests, musicians, entertainers, and temple prostitutes.”


At about the same time, the Anakim (“giants” in the Bible, the beings resulting from marriages between the Igigi and Earthling women) built themselves two urban cities at a time when mankind dwelt in rural settings. The first was Jericho, reputed to be the world’s oldest town. Jericho (Yericho in Arabic, meaning “Moon City”), was dedicated to Sin, whose epithet was “Moon God”. Besides being the penultimate stop for travellers to refresh and lunch, Jericho was established with a view to police the crossing point to Mission Control Centre in Jerusalem and the giant Anakim were best-suited for this purpose.  The second was Kiryat Arba (“Stronghold of Arba”, Arba being the Anakim leader), best-known as Hebron. Kiryat Arba served a similar purpose as Jericho – to guard the route between Jerusalem and the Sinai. When the Israelites conquered Canaan under their general Joshua, the Anakim were a formidable obstacle.
 

NEXT WEEK: GOD IS HERE!

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The Daring Dozen at Bari

8th December 2020
JEFF---Batswana-smoke-unit

Seventy-seven years ago, on the evening of December 2, 1943, the Germans launched a surprise air raid on allied shipping in the Italian port of Bari, which was then the key supply centre for the British 8th army’s advance in Italy.

The attack was spearheaded by 105 Junkers JU88 bombers under the overall command of the infamous Air Marshal Wolfram von Richthofen (who had initially achieved international notoriety during the Spanish Civil War for his aerial bombardment of Guernica). In a little over an hour the German aircraft succeeded in sinking 28 transport and cargo ships, while further inflicting massive damage to the harbour’s facilities, resulting in the port being effectively put out of action for two months.

Over two thousand ground personnel were killed during the raid, with the release of a secret supply of mustard gas aboard one of the destroyed ships contributing to the death toll, as well as subsequent military and civilian casualties. The extent of the later is a controversy due to the fact that the American and British governments subsequently covered up the presence of the gas for decades.

At least five Batswana were killed and seven critically wounded during the raid, with one of the wounded being miraculously rescued floating unconscious out to sea with a head wound. He had been given up for dead when he returned to his unit fourteen days later. The fatalities and casualties all occurred when the enemy hit an ammunition ship adjacent to where 24 Batswana members of the African Pioneer Corps (APC) 1979 Smoke Company where posted.

Thereafter, the dozen surviving members of the unit distinguished themselves for their efficiency in putting up and maintaining smokescreens in their sector, which was credited with saving additional shipping. For his personal heroism in rallying his men following the initial explosions Company Corporal Chitu Bakombi was awarded the British Empire Medal, while his superior officer, Lieutenant N.F. Moor was later given an M.B.E.

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A Strong Marriage Bond Needs Two

8th December 2020

Remember: bricks and cement are used to build a house, but mutual love, respect and companionship are used to build a HOME. And amongst His signs is this: He creates for you mates out of your own kind, so that you may find contentment (Sukoon) with them, and He engenders love and tenderness between you; in this behold, there are signs (messages) indeed for people who reflect and think (Quran 30:21).

This verse talks about contentment; this implies companionship, of their being together, sharing together, supporting one another and creating a home of peace. This verse also talks about love between them; this love is both physical and emotional. For love to exist it must be built on the foundation of a mutually supportive relationship guided by respect and tenderness. As the Quran says; ‘they are like garments for you, and you are garments for them (Quran 2:187)’. That means spouses should provide each other with comfort, intimacy and protection just as clothing protects, warms and dignifies the body.

In Islam marriage is considered an ‘ibaadah’, (an act of pleasing Allah) because it is about a commitment made to each other, that is built on mutual love, interdependence, integrity, trust, respect, companionship and harmony towards each other. It is about building of a home on an Islamic foundation in which peace and tranquillity reigns wherein your offspring are raised in an atmosphere conducive to a moral and upright upbringing so that when we all stand before Him (Allah) on that Promised Day, He will be pleased with them all.

Most marriages start out with great hopes and rosy dreams; spouses are truly committed to making their marriages work. However, as the pressures of life mount, many marriages change over time and it is quite common for some of them to run into problems and start to flounder as the reality of living with a spouse that does not meet with one’s pre-conceived ‘expectations’. However, with hard work and dedication, couples can keep their marriages strong and enjoyable. How is it done? What does it take to create a long-lasting, satisfying marriage?

Below are some of the points that have been taken from a marriage guidance article I read recently and adapted for this purposes.

POSITIVITY
Spouses should have far more positive than negative interactions. If there is too much negativity — criticizing, demanding, name-calling, holding grudges, etc. — the relationship will suffer. However, if there is never any negativity, it probably means that frustrations and grievances are not getting ‘air time’ and unresolved tension is accumulating inside one or both partners waiting to ‘explode’ one day.

“Let not some men among you laugh at others: it may be that the (latter) are better than the (former): nor let some women laugh at others: it may be that the (latter) are better than the (former): nor defame nor be sarcastic to each other, nor call each other by (offensive) nicknames.” (49:11)

We all have our individual faults though we may not see them nor want to admit to them but we will easily identify them in others. The key is balance between the two extremes and being supportive of one another. To foster positivity in a marriage that help make them stable and happy, being affectionate, truly listening to each other, taking joy in each other’s achievements and being playful are just a few examples of positive interactions.
Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) said: “The believers who show the most perfect faith are those who have the best character and the best of you are those who are best to their wives”

UNDERSTANDING

Another characteristic of happy marriages is empathy; understanding your spouses’ perspective by putting oneself in his or her shoes. By showing that understanding and identifying with your spouse is important for relationship satisfaction. Spouses are more likely to feel good about their marriage and if their partner expresses empathy towards them. Husbands and wives are more content in their relationships when they feel that their partners understand their thoughts and feelings.

Successful married couples grow with each other; it simply isn’t wise to put any person in charge of your happiness. You must be happy with yourself before anyone else can be.  You are responsible for your actions, your attitudes and your happiness. Your spouse just enhances those things in your life. Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) said: “Treat your women well and be kind to them for they are your partners and committed helpers.”

COMMITMENT

Successful marriages involve both spouses’ commitment to the relationship. The married couple should learn the art of compromise and this usually takes years. The largest parts of compromise are openness to the other’s point of view and good communication when differences arise.

When two people are truly dedicated to making their marriage work, despite the unavoidable challenges and obstacles that come, they are much more likely to have a relationship that lasts. Husbands and wives who only focus on themselves and their own desires are not as likely to find joy and satisfaction in their relationships.

ACCEPTANCE

Another basic need in a relationship is each partner wants to feel valued and respected. When people feel that their spouses truly accept them for who they are, they are usually more secure and confident in their relationships. Often, there is conflict in marriage because partners cannot accept the individual preferences of their spouses and try to demand change from one another. When one person tries to force change from another, he or she is usually met with resistance.

However, change is much more likely to occur when spouses respect differences and accept each other unconditionally. Basic acceptance is vital to a happy marriage. Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) said: “It is the generous (in character) who is good to women, and it is the wicked who insults them.”
“Overlook (any human faults) with gracious forgiveness.” (Quran 15:85)

COMPASSION, MUTUAL LOVE AND RESPECT

Other important components of successful marriages are love, compassion and respect for each other. The fact is, as time passes and life becomes increasingly complicated, the marriage is often stressed and suffers as a result. A happy and successful marriage is based on equality. When one or the other dominates strongly, intimacy is replaced by fear of displeasing.

It is all too easy for spouses to lose touch with each other and neglect the love and romance that once came so easily. It is vital that husbands and wives continue to cultivate love and respect for each other throughout their lives. If they do, it is highly likely that their relationships will remain happy and satisfying. Move beyond the fantasy and unrealistic expectations and realize that marriage is about making a conscious choice to love and care for your spouse-even when you do not feel like it.

Seldom can one love someone for whom we have no respect. This also means that we have to learn to overlook and forgive the mistakes of one’s partner. In other words write the good about your partner in stone and the bad in dust, so that when the wind comes it blows away the bad and only the good remains.

Paramount of all, marriage must be based on the teachings of the Noble Qur’an and the teachings and guidance of our Prophet Muhammad (PBUH). To grow spiritually in your marriage requires that you learn to be less selfish and more loving, even during times of conflict. A marriage needs love, support, tolerance, honesty, respect, humility, realistic expectations and a sense of humour to be successful.

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Chronic Joblessness: How to Help Curtail it

30th November 2020
Motswana woman

The past week or two has been a mixed grill of briefs in so far as the national employment picture is concerned. BDC just injected a further P64 million in Kromberg & Schubert, the automotive cable manufacturer and exporter, to help keep it afloat in the face of the COVID-19-engendered global economic apocalypse. The financial lifeline, which follows an earlier P36 million way back in 2017, hopefully guarantees the jobs of 2500, maybe for another year or two.

It was also reported that a bulb manufacturing company, which is two years old and is youth-led, is making waves in Selibe Phikwe. Called Bulb Word, it is the only bulb manufacturing operation in Botswana and employs 60 people. The figure is not insignificant in a town that had 5000 jobs offloaded in one fell swoop when BCL closed shop in 2016 under seemingly contrived circumstances, so that as I write, two or three buyers have submitted bids to acquire and exhume it from its stage-managed grave.

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