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Nibiru Wreaks Havoc

Benson C Saili
THIS EARTH, MY BROTHER

Earth, Mars, and Moon in turmoil as planet of the gods approaches

The offspring of Adam and Tiamat (Eve in Genesis) were teeming in line with the wishes of Enki, their creator.  Enki purposed that the Lulus “be fruitful, multiply, and subdue the Earth”, much to the horror of Enlil, the Bible’s primary Jehovah/Yahweh. Earth, after all, was their rightful planet.

 

It was the Anunnaki who were aliens to the planet. Enlil, however, was alarmed and perturbed: he feared that if the Lulus proliferated, they could stage an uprising at some point in time in the foreseeable future against the dismally few Anunnaki and disrupt the vital gold extraction project. The Lulus would never come to have the technological wizardry or military might of the Anunnaki but there was strength in numbers.   Besides, with sympathisers amongst the ranks of Enkites, it wasn’t a stretch that the Lulus could spring a surprise.   


Meanwhile, the Anunnaki royal ranks were also increasing in number. Nannar-Sin had been the first Anunnaki to be born on Earth, to Enlil and his wife Ninlil. Now Nannar-Sin himself and his wife Ningal were blessed with the fraternal twins Utu-Shamash, a boy, and Inanna-Ishtar, a girl.  There were now three generations of Anunnaki royalty on Earth.


The “divine” twins, it emerged, were born at a most portendous time.  At this juncture, which was    80 shars (288,000 Earth years) after the Anunnaki’s arrival on Earth, there was geophysical turmoil on Earth, Mars, the Moon, and the Asteroid Belt. On Earth, global warming was upping, the snow caps around the Arctic and Antarctica land masses were ebbing,  and thunderstorms, tsunamis, and gale force winds   were raging.

 

As if that was not chilling enough, there were earthquakes and earth tremors, with  volcanic activity in overdrive, and meteors were hurtling into the planet without let-up. “Into flaming fires in the skies they were bursting,” Enki observed of the meteors and other rocky projectiles from the cosmic neighbourhood.   “In a clear day darkness they were causing … Like stone missiles the Earth they were attacking.”

 

At the time, Marduk, Enki’s firstborn son was in charge of the Mars outpost. He reported that “strong winds are disturbing, annoying dust storms they are raising: in the Hammered Bracelet (Asteroid Belt) turmoils are occurring.” The Anunnaki top brass were in a fine state of trepidation. Enki’s second-born son Nergal and his wife Ereshkigal were working round the clock at Cape Agulhas, the  astronomical, climate and Earth-monitoring station in South Africa.

 

At Nibruki (Nippur) in the Edin, Enlil and his firstborn son Ninurta were busy monitoring planetary orbits in our Solar System in a special-purpose facility known as the Duranki. Shamgaza, the leader of the Igigi, the Anunnaki astronauts in orbit around Earth and Mars, was burning the midnight oil superintending over the scanning of the heavens from the international space stations of both planets.

 

The professorial Enki, the jack of all trades as well as master of all,  had suspended his life-science experiments at Bit Shimti in East Africa to  devote all his energies to help unravel the conundrum at hand. What the deuce was happening in this section of the ecliptic?    

DREADED MUSHOSHOSHONO LOOMS

At long last, the Anunnaki were able to fathom the cause of the climatic and terrestrial upheavals besetting our planet. Nibiru, aka “The Lord”,  was on its way back to perigee,  its closest orbital position  to the Sun, known as the place of the crossing and of which the name Nibiru, meaning “Planet of the Crossing”, arose. This was not the first time Nibiru’s approach had triggered such cataclysms in the ecliptic but it was the most tempestuous since the Anunnaki came to Earth. “The Earth and the Moon and Lahmu (Mars) a calamity unknown are facing,” lamented Enki.  


The Sumerians, the world’s best-known civilisation of old, did not call Nibiru The Lord for the fun of it: they meant what they said. For starters, Nibiru was the abode of  Anu, “Our Father Who Art In Heaven”,  who was the planet’s ruler and the leader of the Anunnaki in the greater Sirian-Orion empire.

 

Nibiru was also referred to as The Lord or  The Celestial Lord because it was the “creator” of planet Earth 4 billion years ago (from the original planet Tiamat which lay between Jupiter and Mars and of which Earth and the Asteroid Belt are remnants, a phenomenon dubbed the “Celestial Battle”) as well as the primeval propagator of its life forms.    


When Nibiru loomed in Old Testament times, the prophets presaged not glory and bliss but gloom and doom for poor Earthlings. The comet-like reddish planet, which is seen only once in 3600 years – the time it takes to complete one circuit around the Sun – is said to have last appeared in 556 BC (its two appearances prior to that reportedly occurred circa 4000 BC, circa 7450 BC, and circa 11000 BC.) Two hundred years before its last appearance, the Hebrew prophets began to warn the nation of Israel about its calamitous advent. The first one was Amos, who began to prophesy in Judea (southern Palestine) around 760 BC. He was followed by Hosea in Israel (northern Palestine), whose prophecies began in 750 BC.


All the prophecies were dire “beholds” regarding what was going to transpire on “The Day of Judgement”, this being the return of Nibiru to Earth’s vicinities.   The return of Nibiru was described as the Day of Judgement because it was associated with every tragedy and tribulation in the book engendered by the gravitational and slingshot effects of the giant planet – floods, earthquakes, fires, meteorite plunges into Earth, volcanic activities, polar shifts, sudden climatic switches from generally warm weather to an ice age, etc.  That’s why the prophet Amos would say, “Woe unto you that desire the Day of the Lord! To what end is it for you? For the Day of the Lord is darkness and no light” (AMOS 5:18).


In the 6th century BC (between the years  600 BC and 500 BC), the prophets upped the tempo as Nibiru was practically around the corner. “The Day of the Lord is at hand”, the prophet Joel frantically announced. “The Day of the Lord is near”, the prophet Obadiah declared. Circa 570 BC, about twenty-five years before Nibiru finally showed up, the prophet Ezekiel was given the following urgent divine message by the god Yahweh (that is, Enlil):  “Son of Man, prophesy and say: thus sayeth the Lord: Howl and bewail for the Day is near – the Day of the Lord is near!” (EZEKIEL 30:2-3).  


Whereas Nibiru and the hell it entailed were not known to much of the modern world until relatively recently when the iconic Zechariah Sitchin popularised its knowledge  beginning with his 1975 classic The 12th Planet, Africans were aware of the planet. The Zulus for one called it Mushoshonono.

 

Says the legendary Zulu shaman Vusamazulu Credo Mutwa:  “I am told by the great storytellers of our tribes, that …  at one time, many thousands of years ago, a terrible star, or the kind called Mu-sho-sho-no-no, the star with a very long tail, descended very close upon our skies. It came so close that the earth turned upside down and what had become the sky became down, and what was the heavens became up. The whole world was turned upside down. The sun rose in the south and set in the north.

 

Then came drops of burning black stuff, like molten tar, which burned every living thing on earth that could not escape. After that came a terrible deluge of water accompanied by winds so great that they blew whole mountaintops away. And after that came huge chunks of ice bigger than any mountain and the whole world was covered with ice for many generations … And we are told that this thing is going to happen again very soon. Because the great star, which is the lava of our sun, is going to return on the day of the year of the red bull …”


What the prophets foretold about Nibiru 3000 years ago and what Credo Mutwa underscores are both affirmed in the Sumerian chronicles, both in the days of Adam and in the days of Noah. The upheavals of the time Enki relates were particularly dire in that there was a rare conjunction of seven planets from Earth to Pluto. That is to say, the seven planets had aligned and as such Nibiru’s orbital path was slightly muddled.

 

Consequent to that, there was a huge gap in the Asteroid Belt, the “Celestial Bar”, as some asteroids were scattered by the now erratic Nibiru. One huge comet had its path deflected by Nibiru and it pitched into the Moon, causing some of those craters we see that lend to Earth’s only satellite that famous face of a man.

 

And since Nibiru drew so close to the inner planets, all were agitated by its mighty gravity, resulting in the apocalyptic havoc highlighted above.  The planet Venus actually moved  further away from the Sun than it had been to date. Enki and company were hopeless and helpless. All they could do was invoke the “Creator of All” to tame “The Lord”.

ENKI TRAVELS TO THE MOON

Of the most telling disasters Nibiru had wrought was the destruction of the gold transhipment warehouse facilities on Mars and the space station infrastructure overall. Mars was primarily a way station where gold ingots were first shipped from Earth, stockpiled,  and finally taken to Nibiru by way of the mothership.  It was easier to airlift vast quantities of gold  at once from Mars thanks to its less potent gravity compared to Earth.  Under  the prevailing circumstances, there wouldn’t  be much work for Marduk to do. Accordingly, he asked to be redeployed to Earth.


Meanwhile, it was decided by Enlil, Earth’s chief executive, that gold be transported to Nibiru direct from Earth. Enki objected, arguing that that represented a daunting technological challenge in light of Earth’s rather strong gravitational pull. It would gravely affect the momentum of the flow of gold to Nibiru.

 

Enki therefore counter-proposed that prospects for an alternative way station on the much smaller Moon be investigated. The proposition was beamed to King Anu on Nibiru and it was okayed. So to the Moon did Enki and Marduk travel, accompanied by fifty Anunnaki. Altogether they spent six Earth years on the Moon, which was equivalent to a week in Nibiru time.  


Whilst Enki was fascinated by the Moon, which he regarded as a better vantage point to study the Solar System than Earth – the reason they took six years – Marduk wasn’t.  Marduk hated the fact that because of the thin atmosphere and possibly perilous solar radiation levels, they had to be garbed in a space suit all the time.


For the first time as an adult, Marduk had the opportunity to be with his dad all alone and for a  lengthy time. He therefore decided to sit him down for a heart-to-heart, father-son talk. Marduk had concerns to air that stemmed from his marginalisation in Anunnaki matters when he was in  fact of a very high standing in the Anunnaki cosmic pantheon. If you recall, Marduk was second in line to the Sirian-Orion throne after Enlil as  per the terms of the merger between Sirius and Orion. Yet in Earthly matters, he was peripheral: he was not even among the Anunnaki’s 12-man ruling council.


Marduk had three main gripes that he brought to his father’s attention. First, he wondered why Ningishzidda seemed to be his favourite son and the only one Enki had taught practically everything he knew. Second, he wanted to know why  Ninurta was given charge of Badtibira, a position of high clout since it entailed control over Nibiru-bound gold, a most strategic asset.

 

Third, Marduk asked why Enki had to settle for the number 2 position on Earth when it was he who established Eridu, the pioneer settlement on Earth. Why was he so meek? Why should he play second fiddle to Enlil when he was the Anunnaki Big Brain? For how long was he going to continue to offer the other cheek?


“Now to Earth we are returning; what will my task be?” Marduk sobbed before his great dad.  “Am I to fame and kingship fated, or again to humiliated be?” In other words, Marduk wanted a plum position in the pantheon that was befitting of his status and potential and he wanted Enki to make that a reality come rain or shine.


Having pondered the matter over, Enki sat down to work on the zodiacal permutations. It was he who had mapped the entire celestial cycle of the zodiac 25,000 years after his arrival from Nibiru and it was he who assigned names to them. Enki now undertook to Marduk that he was going to see to it that one of these fine days he, Marduk, would be the Enlil, Earth’s Commander-in-Chief.  “The supremacy I have been deprived (that is, command of the Earth) shall be yours my son. That I guarantee,” Enki rendered assurance to his dispirited firstborn son.   

SHAMASH GIVEN CHARGE OF NEW SPACEPORT

Upon their return to Earth, Enki reported to Enlil that for now it was not feasible to use the Moon as a way station in that it was not sufficiently conducive to life. An underground base, a virtual subterranean world, first had to be established but that was a long-term project. Thus pending the reconstruction of warehouse facilities on Mars once Nibiru had retreated, gold should be carried directly to Nibiru from Earth.  


Plans were soon afoot to establish a spaceport in the Eridu to be called Sippar. The moot point, however, was who would be in charge of the spaceport. Enlil proposed Ninurta, which was rapacious really as he already was chief administrator of Badtibira, whilst Enki rooted for Marduk, who had the requisite experience from Mars. It was a stalemate. The matter was referred to King Anu on Nibiru as happened every time opinion was divided among the Anunnaki top brass.


Although King Anu was a good man on balance, he was not without partiality. He tended to side with the Enlilites more often than not. Did that have to do with the fact that Enlil was his flesh-and-blood whereas Enki was a step son? Anu ruled that the spaceport should be commanded not by a first- or second-generation Anunnaki royal but a third-generation.

 

At the time, the seniormost third-generation royal Anunnaki was Utu-Shamash, Enlil’s grandson and so it was he who was entrusted responsibility. And since Marduk had refused to return to Mars, Utu-Shamash was also given command over the Igigi both on Mars and in orbit around Earth.


The construction of the Sippar spaceport began in the 81st shar and was completed in the 82nd shar. That is to say, it took 3600 Earth years. What this clearly demonstrates is that the Anunnaki followed the Nibiru timetable even whilst they were here on Earth. Had they followed Earth time, they would have been done within a year or two at most.


King Anu came down from Nibiru to commission the spaceport. On the occasion, Anu was smitten by what a staggering beauty his great granddaughter Inanna-Ishtar was. He there and then designated her as his official mistress every time he came to Earth. He christened her with the name Anunita, meaning “Anu’s Beloved”.  The affair, which was legal in Anunnaki culture, was consummated on the first night. (In most cultures in Africa too, a grandfather can marry his granddaughter, but whether that extends to a great granddaughter is a contentious point.)


In his speech to a gathering of both the Anunnaki and the Igigi, King Anu gave assurance that in only  a few shars, they would be back home as Nibiru’s atmosphere was on the mend. In the midst of all this though, Marduk was wroth. He refused to take any official responsibilities. Instead, he set out to globetrot the world in his flying saucer with a view to explore the planet in detail. “Over all the lands he wished to roam,” writes Enki. “In his skyship the Earth to comprehend.”  

NEXT WEEK: EARTHLING TRAVELS TO “HEAVEN”

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DIS Parley Committee selection disingenuous 

25th November 2020

Intelligence and Security Service Act, which is a law that establishes the Directorate of Intelligence and Security Service (DIS), provides for establishment of a Parliamentary Committee. Recently, the President announced nine names of Members of Parliament he had appointed to the Committee.

This announcement was preceded by a meeting the President held with the Speaker and the Leader of Opposition. Following the announcement of Committee MPs by the President, the opposition, through its leader, made it clear that it will not participate in the Committee unless certain conditions that would ensure effective oversight are met. The opposition acted on the non-participation threat through resignation of its three MPs from the Committee.

The Act at Section 38 provides for the establishment of the Committee to examine the expenditure, administration and policy of the Directorate. The law provides that the Parliamentary Committee shall have the same powers and privileges set out under the National Assembly (Powers and Privileges) Act.

On composition, the Committee shall consist of nine members who shall not be members of Cabinet and its quorum shall be five members.  The MPs in the Committee elect a chairperson from among their number at their first meeting.

The Members of the Committee are appointed by the President after consultation with the Speaker of the National Assembly and Leader of the Opposition in the National Assembly. It is the provision of the law that the Committee, relative to its size, reflect the numerical strengths of the political parties represented in the National Assembly.

The Act provides that that a member of the Committee holds office for the duration of the Parliament in which he or she is appointed.  The Committee is mandated to make an annual report on the discharge of their functions to the President and may at any time report to him or her on any matter relating to the discharge of those functions.

The Minister responsible for intelligence and security is obliged to lay before the National Assembly a copy of each annual report made by the Committee together with a statement as to whether any matter has been excluded from that copy in pursuance of the provision of the Act.

If it appears to the Minister, after consultation with the Parliamentary Committee, that the publication of any matter in a report would be prejudicial to the continued discharge of the functions of the Directorate, the Minister may exclude that matter from the copy of the report as laid before the National Assembly.

So, what are the specific demands of the Opposition and why are they not participating in the Committee? What should happen as a way forward? The Opposition demanded that there be a forensic audit of the Directorate. The DIS has never been audited since it was set up in 2008, more than a decade ago.

The institution has been a law unto itself for a longtime, feared by all oversight bodies. The Auditor General, who had no security of tenure, could not audit the DIS. The Directorate’s personnel, especially at a high level, have been implicated in corruption.  Some of its operatives are in courts of law defending corruption charges preferred against them. Some of the corruption cases which appeared in the media have not made it to the courts.

The DIS has been accused of non-accountability and unethical practices as well as of being a burden on the fiscus.  So, the Opposition demanded, from the President, a forensic audit for the purpose of cleaning up the DIS.  They demand a start from a clean slate.

The second demand by the Opposition is that the law be reviewed to ensure greater accountability of the DIS to Parliament. What are some of the issues that the opposition think should be reviewed? The contention is that the executive cannot appoint a Committee of Parliament to scrutinize an executive institution.

Already, it is argued, Parliament is less independent and it is dominated by the executive. It is contended that the Committee should be established by the Standing Orders and be appointed by a Select Committee of Parliament. There is also an argument that the Committee should report to Parliament and not to the President and that the Minister should not have any role in the Committee.

Democratic and Parliamentary oversight of the intelligence is relatively a new phenomenon across the World. Even developed democracies are still grappling with some of these issues. However, there are acceptable standards or what might be called international best practices which have evolved over the past two or so decades.

In the UK for instance, MPs of the Intelligence and Security Committee are appointed by the Houses of Parliament, having been nominated by the Prime Minister in consultation with the Leader of the Opposition. This is a good balancing exercise of involvement of both the executive and the legislature. Consultation is taken for granted in Botswana context in the sense that it has been reduced to just informing the Leader of Opposition without much regard to his or her ideas; they are never taken seriously.

Furthermore, the current Committee in the UK has four Members of the ruling party and five MPs from the opposition. It is a fairly balanced Committee in terms of Parliamentary representation. However, as said above, the President of Botswana appointed six ruling party MPs and three from the opposition.

The imbalance is preposterous and more pronounced with clear intentions of getting the executive way through the ruling party representatives in the Committee. The intention to avoid scrutiny is clear from the numbers of the ruling party MPs in the Committee.

There is also an international standard of removing sensitive parts which may harm national security from the report before it is tabled in the legislature. The previous and current reluctance of the executive arms to open up on Defence and Security matters emanate from this very reason of preserving and protecting national security.

But national security should be balanced with public interest and other democratic principles. The decision to expunge certain information which may be prejudicial to national security should not be an arbitrary and exclusive decision of the executive but a collective decision of a well fairly balanced Committee in consultation with the Speaker and the minister responsible.

There is no doubt that the DIS has been a rogue institution. The reluctance by the President to commit to democratic-parliamentary oversight reforms presupposes a lack of commitment to democratization. The President has no interest in seeing a reformed DIS with effective oversight of the agency.

He is insincere. This is because the President loathes the idea losing an iota of power and sharing it with any other democratic institution. He sees the agency as his power lever to sustain his stay in the high office. He thought he could sanitize himself with an ineffective DIS Committee that would dance to his tune.

The non-participation of the opposition MPs renders the Committee dysfunctional; it cannot function as this would be unlawful. Participation of the opposition is a legal requirement. Even if it can meet, it would lack legitimacy; it cannot be taken seriously. The President should therefore act on the oversight demands and reform the DIS if he is to be taken seriously.

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The Maccabean Uprising

25th November 2020
Jewish freedom fighters

 Jews drive away occupying power under the command of guerrilla leader Judas Maccabees but only just

Although it was the Desolation Sacrilege act, General Atiku, that officially sparked the Maccabean revolt, it in truth simply stoked the fires of an already simmering revolution. How so General?

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Atomic (CON)Fusion

25th November 2020

For years I have trained people about paradigm shifts – those light-bulb-switch-on moments – where there is a seismic change from the usual way of thinking about something to a newer, better way. 

I like to refer to them as ‘aha’ moments because of the sudden understanding of something which was previously incomprehensible. However,  the topic of today’s article is the complete antithesis of ‘aha’.  Though I’d love to tell you I’d had a ‘eureka ‘, ‘problem solved’ moment, I am faced with the complete opposite – an ‘oh-no’ moment or Lost Leader Syndrome.

No matter how well prepared or capable a leader is. they often find themselves facing perplexing events, confounding information, or puzzling situations. Confused by developments of which they can’t make sense and by challenges that they don’t know how to solve they become confused, sometimes lost and completely clueless about what to do.

I am told by Jentz and Murphy (JM) in ‘What leaders do when they don’t know what to do’ that this is normal, and that rapid change is making confusion a defining feature of management in the 21st century.  Now doesn’t that sound like the story of 2020 summed up in a single sentence?

The basic premise of their writing is that “confusion is not a weakness to be ashamed of but a regular and inevitable condition of leadership. By learning to embrace their confusion, managers are able to set in motion a constructive process for addressing baffling issues.

In fact, confusion turns out to be a fruitful environment in which the best managers thrive by using the instability around them to open up better lines of communication, test their old assumptions and values against changing realities, and develop more creative approaches to problem solving.”

The problem with this ideology however is that it doesn’t help my overwhelming feelings of fear and panic which is exacerbated by a tape playing on a loop in my head saying  ‘you’re supposed to know what to do, do something’. My angst is compounded by annoying motivational phrases also unhelpfully playing in my head like.

  • Nothing happens until something moves
  • The secret of getting ahead is getting started

and

  • Act or be acted upon

All these platitudes are urging me to pull something out of the bag, but I know that this is a trap. This need to forge ahead is nothing but a coping mechanism and disguise. Instead of owning the fact that I haven’t got a foggy about what to do, part of me worries that I’ll lose authority if I acknowledge that I can’t provide direction – I’m supposed to know the answers, I’m the MD!  This feeling of not being in control is common for managers in ‘oh no’ situations and as a result they often start reflexively and unilaterally attempting to impose quick fixes to restore equilibrium because, lets be honest, sometimes we find it hard to resist hiding our confusion.

To admit that I am lost in an “Oh, No!” moment opens the door not only to the fear of losing authority but also to a plethora of other troubling emotions and thoughts:  *Shame and loss of face: “You’ll look like a fool!” * Panic and loss of control: “You’ve let this get out of hand!” * Incompetence and incapacitation: “You don’t know what you’re doing!”

As if by saying “I’m at a loss here” is tantamount to declaring “I am not fit to lead.” Of course the real problem for me and any other leader is if they don’t admit when they are disoriented, it sends a signal to others in the organisation stating it’s not cool to be lost and that, by its very nature encourages them to hide.  What’s the saying about ‘a real man never asks for direction. ..so they end up driving around in circles’.

As managers we need to embrace the confusion, show vulnerability (remember that’s not a bad word) and accept that leadership is not about pretending to have all the answers but about having the courage to search with others to discover a solution.

JM point out that “being confused, however, does not mean being incapacitated.  Indeed, one of the most liberating truths of leadership is that confusion is not quicksand from which to escape but rather the potter’s clay of leadership – the very stuff with which managers can work.”

2020 has certainly been a year to remember and all indications are that the confusion which has characterised this year will still follow us into the New Year, thereby making confusion a defining characteristic of the new normal and how managers need to manage. Our competence as leaders will then surely be measured not only by ‘what I know’ but increasingly by ‘how I behave when I accept, I don’t know, lose my sense of direction and become confused.

.I guess the message for all organizational cultures going forward is that sticking with the belief that we need all-knowing, omni-competent executives will cost them dearly and send a message to managers that it is better to hide their confusion than to address it openly and constructively.

Take comfort in these wise words ‘Confusion is a word we have invented for an order not yet understood’!

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