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Enki Probes The Heavens

Benson C Saili
THIS EARTH, MY BROTHER

How the celestial arc we call the Zodiac was figured out
    
Although Alalu was the first royal Sirian  to set foot on Earth and even ruled the planet for the most part of  28,800 years, he did not at the end of the day make that much of a historic mark as he relatively quickly fell into disgrace and was forever tainted. It was Enki, his designated deputy, who eclipsed him and who is today “honoured”, albeit unwittingly, as the planet’s founder: this tribute is indeed borne out in the very word “Earth”, which is prefixed with his other name “Ea”. Of course his step-brother Enlil, the Bible’s main Jehovah, is religiously the more revered but that is simply because he extorted this preeminence by hook and crook. As we shall soon demonstrate, it is Enki who is to all intents and purposes the father of mankind from a material point of view.    

Enki was a versatile scientist, acknowledged by the Anunnaki as Nibiru’s greatest intellect ever. It is not surprising, therefore, that when he arrived on Earth about 432,000 years ago, he did not merely restrict himself to the critical imperative of gold extraction: he also devoted himself to studying the planet’s flora and fauna, its geography and seasonality, and its firmament.  It did not take him long to divide a day into 12 x 2 hours of 60 minutes each; a week into 7 days; a month into 30 days on average; and a year into 12 months amounting to roughly 360 days (The ancients used a 360-day calendar, which was reconciled with the natural solar year of 365.25 days every 6 years through adding a 30-day leap month). Why these particular reckonings, which were based on the numbers 6, 7, 12 and 30?

CORRELATING NIBIRUIAN AND EARTHLY MATHEMATICS

We did casually touch on this subject in an earlier piece, but it does bear repeating and further elucidation anyway.  Whilst in modern-day mathematics we base our calculations on the Decimal System, or simply the number 10, Nibiru mathematics was based on the number 6. Nibiru’s Base 6 was owing to the fact that the Anunnaki, unlike Earthlings, were born with 12 digits – six fingers and six toes. Earthlings are born with a total of 10 digits – five fingers and five toes. On very rare occasions, some people come into the world with 12 digits, as happened with a late maternal cousin of  mine, and are immediately operated upon to remove the extra ones. These incidences bear out the fact that humans indeed do carry Anunnaki genes.  

Enki divided the day into 12 double hours of 60 minutes each. The number 12 primarily derived from the composition of the Solar System’s principal celestial bodies – the Sun; the Moon; Mercury; Venus; Earth; Mars; Jupiter; Saturn; Uranus; Neptune; Pluto (NASA in 2006 demoted Pluto to a minor planet without obtaining permission from Lord  Enki!), and Nibiru.  The number 60 represented ultimate authority in Anunnaki lore, as it stood for Anu, the ruler of Nibiru and the  greater Sirian-Orion empire. Mathematically, it was the lowest common multiple of 10 and 6 and so best reconciled Earth’s and Nibiru’s natural mathematical base numbers. It is in this light that Sumerian mathematics, the Sumerians being the world’s best  known civilisation of old, was sexagesimal, that is, based on the number 60.     

As he observed the heavens, Enki noticed that the Moon was seen only once in about 28 days. Ideally, he should have divided a year into 13 lunar months totaling 364 days. Instead, Enki divided a month into basically 30 days of four ill-fitting weeks constituting 7 days each. Why did he do this? Well, Enki intended a closer correlation between Earthly  phenomena and that of  Nibiru. On Nibiru, a year was equivalent to 3600 Earth years; a month was equivalent to 360 Earth years; a week was equivalent to 36 Earth years; and a Nibiru day was equivalent to 30 Earth days.

It was to relate a Nibiru day with an Earth month that  Enki allotted 30 days to an Earthly month (A 12-month-year also matched the 12-man Pantheon of Anunnaki “Gods”).  As for a 7-day week, this, as we have already seen, principally had to do with the fact that Enki and his Heroes toiled for six “days” whilst setting up Eridu, their first settlement on Earth, and rested on the seventh “day”. 

The number 7 ultimately came to denote Earth, being the 7th planet from Pluto’s direction. It explains why 7 and its derivative numbers like 17 and 70 bear such Biblical significance, witness Jesus’ impassioned appeal to “forgive 70 times 7 times”. (The Bible is fraught with numerology and other mystical symbolism whose meaning, significance, implication,  and ramifications are best understood only by the Illuminati and dedicated researchers.)  

MAPPING THE GREAT YEAR

What names did Enki give to each of the 12 months of our year? This is a brain teaser as history shows that the names appear to change from age to age and even between the great metropolises of Sumerian and Babylonian times. Nor are we any wiser as to exactly what names  Enki gave to each of  the 7 days of  the week. The names we use today are of Roman origin and were assigned sometime between the Ist and 3rd centuries.

They all derive from celestial bodies as follows: Sunday (from the Sun); Monday (from the Moon); Tuesday (“Day of Mars” in Latin); Wednesday (“Day of Mercury” in Latin); Thursday (“Day of Jupiter” in Latin); Friday (“Day of Venus” in Latin); and Saturday (from Saturn).

The Romans chose these 7 celestial bodies because at the time, they were the only ones known of  the Solar System: the Sumerian civilisation, which was aware of  all the 12 principal  members of the Solar System including Nibiru, had long disappeared along with the bulk of its scholarly as well as astronomical knowledge.  

After living on Earth for seven straight shars, or over 25,200 years, Enki concretised a celestial study he had been patiently making all along – that roughly every 2160 years,   there was a different band of stars – a constellation – in Earth’s evening skies.

Indeed, at the beginning of the eighth shar, Enki noted that the constellation that he observed during his first 2160 years on Earth reappeared. In other words, the cycle had begun all over again. The constellations were of course not uniform in their duration: some lasted slightly longer or shorter than others.

Enki, therefore, took the average duration, 2160 years, as the base mathematical figure, especially that it was divisible by both 6 and 60. Altogether, he counted 12 varying constellations. Why did the evening sky’s starry backdrop alter every 2160 years?

As the Earth revolves around the Sun, the Sun is at the same time revolving around the centre of the Milky Way galaxy and therefore is carrying the Earth and other planets with it. What this entails is that the Earth, once it has completed one year around the Sun, does not return to the same exact spot it was the previous year, for it is actually moving from one constellation to another, or from one zodiac house to another in a celestial arc.

The Earth, Enki calculated, spent an average of 2160 years, also called an age, in each house, which was equivalent to 30 degrees of the celestial arc – the great circular path it made in its motion in space. Because 30 degrees amounted to 2160 years, then one degree amounted to 72 years.

To completely traverse all the 12 houses, the Earth spent an average  total of 25,920 years, or one complete revolution of 360 degrees. Thus the Earth, in its journey through the zodiac houses, returned to the same exact spot in space only once in 25,920 years. Enki called this duration the Great Year or the Grand Circle.  In our day, we call it the precession of the equinoxes.    

NAMING THE CONSTELLATIONS

Having ascertained the Great Year, it was now time for Enki to allocate names to each of the 12 Houses of the Zodiac. What would be the basis for their naming? Enki decided the cue would be the most apparent shape each constellation made in the evening sky.

For instance, he recalled that in his first 2160 years on Earth, the evening sky’s starry background resembled that of a lion. So he called this constellation URGULA, or Leo as we call it today. By the same token, he thought Cancer’s pattern resembled a Crab; Taurus  looked a lot like a bull; Pisces’ was like  two fishes; and so forth and so on.  

The 12 constellations were observable mainly in the skies over the part of the Earth that lies between latitudes 30 degrees north and 30 degrees south. Enki called this celestial band the Way of Anu, after his step father.

The northern skies, that is those seen north of the 30th parallel, he called the Way of Enlil to accord with Enlil’s base in the EDIN, whereas the southern skies, those seen south of the 30th parallel, he named the Way of Enki  as indeed he himself was now to be based  in the Abzu, today’s southern Africa, to oversee gold mining activities. It was Enki who marked the lines of latitude as well as the meridian lines.

Conventional history, of course,  will throw up such names as Amerigo Vespucci and, in relation to pointing mankind to the zodiac phenomenon, Hipparchus, but that is a red herring – a device meant to conceal the fact that there were technologically advanced peoples on Earth who figured  these out   long before mankind emerged.

By most calculations, the last Great Year, the one still in progress, began in 23820 BC with the constellation Aquarius. We are now in the Age of Pisces, which began in 60 BC. In the next 90 years or thereabouts, Pisces will be bidding farewell to us to again give way to the Age of Aquarius: the conclusion of the Great Year is upon us. 

That is speaking mathematically. In actuality, we may as well be in the age of Aquarius already as signs abound that there is a great deal of water symbolism in happenings around us – the ice bucket water  challenge, capsizing ferries on seas as people from the Third World attempt to emigrate to Europe to escape wars and economic hardships at home, and repeated incidences of airliners plunging and disappearing into the sea.  

History shows that when a new constellation had relatively recently been ushered in, its symbol came into vogue in human affairs. I will provide just one example in this connection. In the first three centuries of the Age of Pieces, the fish motif was practically all around.

This phenomenon is nowhere better illustrated than in the New Testament, where Jesus is said to have formed the core of his apostolic band from fishermen; multiplied a couple of fishes to feed the multitudes listening to his countryside sermons; alluded to prophet Jonah spending three days in the belly of a fish; and himself fed on  a boiled fish post-resurrection.

In point of fact (which fact most Christians do not know), in the first three centuries, the Christian symbol was not the cross: it was fish! In his book The End of Days, the legendary Zechariah Sitchin shows a picture of a mosaic floor of an ancient Christian church date to the 3rd century AD. In the centre of  the floor is a depiction of  two fishes – the zodiacal sign of Pisces.   

You will also note  that the ceremonial headdress worn by the Pope and other Catholic bishops – called a mitre – is in the shape of a fish. The Jesus story is steeped in fish symbolism as the Bible lays bare.  

ASSIGNING ZODIACAL AGES

Just as the members of the Anunnaki pantheon of the 12 did have celestial counterparts – planets which symbolised them – they also had zodiacal counterparts – constellations that symbolised them. However, the symbolism was not particular to one person in every epoch: it differed according to Anunnaki political dynamics. As such, if Leo, for example, represented Enki in one Great Year, in the next year it might represent Utu-Shamash.  

When Enki first came to Earth, he did so in the age of Leo – URGULA in Sumerian, meaning “Lion”. The lion is a sign of royalty. Initially therefore, Leo was dedicated to Enki as  the God of Africa.

In future epochs, Leo was associated with Utu-Shamash, Enlil-Jehovah’s grandson to coincide with his status as a Sun God since the lion also symbolised the Sun, with its mane representing the Sun’s corona.

In yet another epoch, Leo was the zodiacal emblem of Inanna-Ishtar, Shamash’s twin sister. This we glean from ancient depictions of Leo, which variously show Inanna riding a lion,  holding the lion by its tail, or keeping a lion on a leash, all triumphant gestures. 

It all allegorised her theft of the ME’s (tiny objects encoded with formulas for all aspects of science and civilization) from Enki at one time, after which she briefly wielded a command of general knowledge that rivalled Enki’s.

Cancer (DUB, meaning “Pincers”) was associated with Ninurta, Enlil-Jehovah’s firstborn son who  was a formidable warrior, particularly in view of his vanquishment of Kumarbi, the “evil Zu”. Gemini (MASHTABA, “The Twins”) obviously commemorated the twins Inanna and Shamash, who the Egyptian zodiac indeed depicted as male and female. Taurus (GUANNA, “The Heavenly Bull”) was primarily the symbol of Enlil, who was indeed known as the Bull of Heaven.

But the fact that the Taurian bull was depicted with the symbol of the planet Saturn on its back could also point to Ninurta, Enlil’s firstborn son whose celestial symbol was Saturn. Ishkur-Adad is yet another candidate as not only did he set up residence in the Taurus mountain range that stretched all the way from Turkey to Iraq but he too did adopt the bull as his secondary symbol as a prospective Enlil.   

Aries (KUMAL, “Field Dweller”) would have been dedicated to Marduk, who took Abel under his wing to teach him shepherding, or his youngest brother Dumuzi,  whose expertise in animal husbandry in today’s Sudan was lauded.

The last age of Aries (2160-0) was plainly dedicated to Marduk. Pisces (SIMMAH, “Fishes”) was Enki’s fundamental symbol as attested by his other name  Ea, which means “He Who Lives in Water”. Enki in fact had a fishpond at his dwelling at Eridu. But in some epochs, Pisces could have been dedicated to Ereshkigal, Enki’s granddaughter who was a prolific breeder of fish in today’s Great Lakes region of Africa as a spouse of  Nergal,  Enki’s son.

Whereas Aquarius (GU, “Lord of the Waters”) could have been Enki’s emblem in   some epochs, the argument is persuasive that it largely applied to Ninagal, his fourth son with Damkina. For Ninagal’s epithet was “Lord of  the Great Waters” – the seas.

This was because he was the Anunnaki’s maestro maritime navigator, who was in charge of transporting ores by sea from the Abzu, southern Africa, to the Edin in Sumeria. Capricorn (SUHURMASH, “Goat-Fish”) is clearly Enki’s symbol. Enki’s principal emblem was that of  fish but he was something of a goat too.

In ancient times, a goat represented reproductive power (it has the biggest balls of any animal in proportion to its body and produces the hugest amount of semen in a single ejaculation). We know that Enki was a serial philanderer who planted children all over the place.

Moreover, Enki was dubbed the Devil by Enlil-Jehovah for imparting privilleged knowledge to Adam and Eve. Enki therefore has since been the scapegoat for all the evil that wracks the world. His Capricorn symbolism was most likely intended as   a resounding protest at this most glaring injustice.     

Sagittarius (PABIL, “Defender”) is presented as an archer, a hunter. It could have represented Ninurta, who was the god of hunting. But in some epochs, it may have represented Enki, the only one of the Anunnaki pantheon who was a full-blooded Aryan (a being from Orion).

The Orion constellation is also known as the hunter. Scorpio (GIRTAB, “which claws and cuts”) no doubt was the zodiacal counterpart of  Utu-Shamash for it was he who was in charge of both the pre-flood and post-diluvial Anunnaki spaceports in Sippar and in the Sinai peninsula respectively. Indeed, the syllable GIR connotes rockets. In any case, the Anunnaki  rank and file who guarded the spaceports were called “scorpion men” as they were always primed to “sting” trespassers.

The most probable candidate for Libra (ZIBAANNA, “Heavenly Fate”), represented by scales, is again Utu-Shamash, who was the Anunnaki god of justice. His cult city Sippar in fact housed the Anunnaki supreme court. Finally, Virgo (ABSIN, “Her father was Sin”) clearly was emblematic of Inanna, whose father indeed was Nanna-Sin, Enlil-Jehovah’s second born son and the Allah of  Islam.  Virgo is depicted as a beautiful maiden, which Inanna once actually was.    

NEXT WEEK: THE RIDDLE OF OUR COMING INTO BEING

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Technology saves Lions from angry Okavango villagers

22nd November 2022

Villagers in the eastern Okavango region are now using an alert system which warns them when collared lions approach livestock areas. The new technology is now regarded as a panacea to the human/wildlife conflict in the area as it has reduced mass poisoning and killing of lions by farmers.

The technology is being implemented by an NGO, Community Living Among Wildlife Sustainably (CLAWS) within the five villages of Seronga, Gunutsoga, Eretsha, Beetsha and Gudigwa in the eastern part of the Okavango delta.

A Carnivore Ecologist from CLAWS, Dr Andrew Stein explained that around 2013, villagers in the eastern Okavango were having significant problems with losses of their cattle to predators specifically lions, so the villagers resorted to using poison and shooting the lions in order to reduce their numbers.

He highlighted that as a form of progressive intervention, they designed a programme to reduce the conflicts and promote coexistence. Another component of the programme is communal herding, introduced in 2018 to reduce the conflict by increasing efficiency whereby certified herders monitor livestock health and protect them from predators, allowing community members to engage in other livelihood activities knowing that their livestock are safe.

They are now two herds with 600 and 230 cattle respectively with plan to expand the programme to other neighbouring villages. Currently the programme is being piloted in Eretsha, one of the areas with most conflict incidences per year.

Dr Stein explained that they have developed the first of its kind alert system whereby when the lions get within three or five kilometers of a cattllepost or a homestead upon the five villages, then it will release an alert system going directly to the cellphones of individuals living within the affected area or community.

‘So, if a colored lion gets to about five kilometers of Eretsha village or any villagers in the Eretsha that has signed up for, the system will receive an SMS of the name of the lion and its distance to or from the village”, he stated. He added that this enables villagers to take preventative action to reduce conflicts before its starts.

Dr Stein noted that some respond by gathering their cattle and put them in a kraal or put them in an enclosure making sure that the enclosure is secure while some people will gather firewood and light small fires around edges of the kraal to prevent lions from coming closer and some when they receive the SMS they send their livestock to the neighbours alerting them about the presence of lions.

He noted that 125 people have signed to receive the alert system within Seronga, Eretsha, Beetsha, Gunutsoga and Gudigwa. He added that each homestead is about five people and this means more than 600 people immediately receive the messages about lions when they approach their villages. He also noted that last year they dispersed over 12 000 alerts, adding that this year is a bit higher as about 20 000 alerts have been sent so far across these villages.

Stein further noted that they have been significant changes in the behavior of the villagers as they are now tolerant to lions. “85 percent were happy with the SMS and people are becoming more tolerant with living with lions because they have more information to reduce the conflicts,” he stressed.

Stein noted that since the start of the programme in 2014 they have seen lion populations rebounds almost completely to a level before and they have not recorded cases of lion poisoning in the last three years which is commendable effort.

Monnaleso Sanga from Eretsha village applauded the programme by CLAWS noting that farmers in the area are benefiting through the alert system and take preventative measures to reduce human/lion conflict which has been persistent in the area. He added that numbers of cattle killed by lions have reduced immensely. He also admitted that they are now tolerant to lions and they no longer kill nor poison them.

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THE IDEAL QUALITY OF A MUSLIM

8th September 2022

A Muslim is supposed to be and should be a living example of the teachings of the Quran and the ‘Sunnah’ (the teachings and living examples of Prophet Muhammed (SAW – Peace be upon Him). We should follow these in all affairs, relations, and situations – starting with our relationship with our Lord, our own self, our family and the people around us. One of the distinguishing features of the (ideal) Muslim is his faith in Allah, and his conviction that whatever happens in the universe and whatever befalls him, only happens through the will and the decree of the Almighty Allah.

A Muslim should know and feel that he is in constant need of the help and support of Allah, no matter how much he may think he can do for himself. He has no choice in his life but to submit to the will of his Creator, worship Him, strive towards the Right Path and do good deeds. This will guide him to be righteous and upright in all his deeds, both in public and in private.

His attitude towards his body, mind and soul

The Muslim pays attention to his body’s physical, intellectual and spiritual needs. He takes good care of his body, promoting its good health and strength. He shouldn’t eat in excess; but he should eat enough to maintain his health and energy. Allah, The Exalted, Says “…Eat and drink; but waste not by excess, for Allah loves not the wasters.” [Quran 7: 31]

The Muslim should keep away from alcohol and drugs. He should also try to exercise regularly to maintain his physical fitness. The Muslim also keeps his body and clothes clean, he bathes frequently. The Prophet placed a great emphasis on cleanliness and bathing. A Muslim is also concerned with his clothing and appearance but in accordance with the Islamic ideal of moderation, avoiding the extremes.

As for his intellectual care, the Muslim should take care of his mind by pursuing beneficial knowledge. It is his responsibility to seek knowledge whether it is religious or secular, so he may understand the nature and the essence of things. Allah Says: “…and say: My Lord! Increase me in knowledge.” [Quran 20: 114

The Muslim should not forget that man is not only composed of a body and a mind, but that he also possesses a soul and a spirit. Therefore, the Muslim pays as much attention to his spiritual development as to his physical and intellectual development, in a balanced manner which ideally does not concentrate on one aspect to the detriment of others.

His attitude towards people

The Muslim must treat his parents with kindness and respect, compassion, politeness and deep gratitude. He recognizes their status and knows his duties towards them. Allah Says “And serve Allah. Ascribe nothing as partner unto Him. (Show) kindness unto parents…” [Quran 4: 36]

With his wife, the Muslim should exemplify good and kind treatment, intelligent handling, deep understanding of the nature and psychology of women, and proper fulfilment of his responsibilities and duties.

With his children, the Muslim is a parent who should understand his responsibility towards their good upbringing, showing them love and compassion, influence their Islamic development and giving them proper education, so that they become active and constructive elements in society, and a source of goodness for their parents, community, and society as a whole.

With his relatives, the Muslim maintains the ties of kinship and knows his duties towards them. He understands the high status given to relatives in Islam, which makes him keep in touch with them, no matter what the circumstances.

 

With his neighbours, the Muslim illustrates good treatment, kindness and consideration of others’ feelings and sensitivities. He turns a blind eye to his neighbour’s faults while taking care not to commit any such errors himself. The Muslim relationship with his wider circle of friends is based on love for the sake of Allah. He is loyal and does not betray them; he is sincere and does not cheat them; he is gentle, tolerant and forgiving; he is generous and he supplicates for them.

In his social relationships with all people, the Muslim should be well-mannered, modest and not arrogant. He should not envy others, fulfils his promises and is cheerful. He is patient and avoids slandering and uttering obscenities. He should not unjustly accuse others nor should he interfere in that which does not concern him. He refrains from gossiping, spreading slander and stirring up trouble – avoids false speech and suspicion. When he is entrusted with a secret, he keeps it. He respects his elders. He mixes with the best of people. He strives to reconcile between the Muslims. He visits the sick and attends funerals. He returns favours and is grateful for them. He calls others to Islam with wisdom, example and beautiful preaching. He should guide people to do good and always make things easy and not difficult.

The Muslim should be fair in his judgments, not a hypocrite, a sycophant or a show-off. He should not boast about his deeds and achievements. He should be straightforward and never devious or twisted, no matter the circumstances. He should be generous and not remind others of his gifts or favours. Wherever possible he relieves the burden of the debtor. He should be proud and not think of begging.

These are the standards by which the (ideal) Muslim is expected to structure his life on. Now how do I measure up and fit into all this? Can I honestly say that I really try to live by these ideals and principles; if not can I really call myself a true Muslim?

For the ease of writing this article I have made use of for want of a better word, the generic term ‘he’, ‘his’, ‘him’ and the ‘male’ gender, but it goes without saying that these standards apply equally to every female and male Muslim.

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OUR BELOVED CHILDREN

29th August 2022

“Homicide and suicide kill almost 7000 children every year; one in four of all children are born to unmarried mothers, many of whom are children themselves…..children’s potential lost to spirit crushing poverty….children’s hearts lost in divorce and custody battles….children’s lives lost to abuse and violence, our society lost to itself, as we fail our children.” “If you bungle raising your children, I don’t think whatever else you do matters very much.” (Quotation taken from a book written by Hillary Clinton).

These words may well apply to us here in Botswana; We are also experiencing a series of challenges in many spheres of development and endeavour but none as challenging as the long term effects of what is going to happen to our youth of today. One of the greatest challenges facing us as parents today is how to guide our youth to become the responsible adults that we wish them to be, tomorrow.

In Islam Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) has enjoined upon the parents to take care of the moral and religious instruction of their children from the very beginning, otherwise they will be called to account for negligence on the Day of Judgement. Parents must inculcate God-consciousness in their children from an early age, whereby the children will gain an understanding of duty to The Creator.

 

The Holy Qur’an says: ‘O you who believe! Save yourself and your families from the Fire of Hell’. (Ch. 66: V6). This verse places the responsibility on the shoulders of the parents to ensure that training and guidance begin at home. The goal is to mould the child into a solid Islamic personality, with good morals, strong Islamic principles, knowledge and behavior so as to be equipped to face the demands of life in a responsible and mature manner. This should begin with the proper environment at home that inculcates the best moral and behavioral standards.

But what do we have instead? Believers of all Religious persuasions will agree that we have children growing up without parental guidance, a stable home environment, without role models, being brought up in surroundings that are not conducive to proper upbringing and moulding of well-adjusted children. These children are being brought up devoid of any parental guidance and increasingly the desperate situation of orphaned children having to raise their siblings (children raising children) because their parents have succumbed to the scourge of AIDS.

It is becoming common that more and more girls still in their schooling years are now falling pregnant, most of them unwanted, with the attendant responsibilities and difficulties.

Observe the many young ladies who are with children barely in their teens having illegitimate children. In the recent past there was a campaign focused on the ‘girl-child’; this campaign targeted this group of young females who had fallen pregnant and were now mothers. The situation is that the mother still being just a ‘child’ and not even having tasted adulthood, now has the onerous responsibility of raising her own child most of the time on her own because either the father has simply disappeared, refuses to takes responsibility, or in some cases not even known.

We cannot place the entire blame on these young mothers; as parents and society as a whole stand accused because we have shirked our responsibilities and worse still we ourselves are poor role models. The virtual breakdown of the extended family system and of the family unit in many homes means that there are no longer those safe havens of peace and tranquility that we once knew. How then do we expect to raise well-adjusted children in this poisoned atmosphere?

Alcohol has become socially acceptable and is consumed by many of our youth and alarmingly they are now turning to drugs. Alcohol is becoming so acceptable that it is easily accessible even at home where some parents share drinks with their children or buying it for them. This is not confined only to low income families it is becoming prevalent amongst our youth across the board.

 

It is frightening to witness how our youth are being influenced by blatantly suggestive pop culture messages over television, music videos and other social media. Children who are not properly grounded in being able to make rational and informed decisions between what is right and what is wrong are easily swayed by this very powerful medium.

 

So what do we do as parents? We first have to lead by example; it is no longer the parental privilege to tell the child ‘do as I say not as I do’- that no longer works. The ball is in the court of every religious leader (not some of the charlatans who masquerade as religious leaders), true adherents and responsible parents. We cannot ignore the situation we have to take an active lead in guiding and moulding our youth for a better tomorrow.

In Islam Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) said: “No father gives a better gift to his children than good manners and good character.”  Children should be treated not as a burden, but a blessing and trust of Allah, and brought up with care and affection and taught proper responsibilities etiquettes and behaviour.

Even the Bible says; ‘Suffer the little children to come unto me and forbid them not, for of such is the kingdom of God. Verily I say unto you, whosoever shall not receive the kingdom of God as a little child, he shall not enter therein’. (Mark 10:14-15)

The message is clear and needs to be taken by all of us: Parents let us rise to the occasion – we owe it to our children and their future.

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