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Jobs Stats hoist red flags

This week President Dr Mokgweetsi Masisi admitted to job creation being one of his “greatest” struggle, saying the economy is failing to yield jobs as yet. The President further, through the local media midweek, addressed Batswana’s impatience on lack of jobs saying but the economy would not work that way.

Masisi who has been dubbed the “Jobs President” when taking over presidency in 2018 is already feeling the heat from his critics who are accusing him of being Janus-faced when addressing the unemployment issue. Masisi’s critics were up in arms after the president recently sounded to divert that which he made his top priority even when he took leadership of the ruling party in 2016, job creation.

Last month from the Masisi was accused of trying to divert his promise of creation of jobs to the private sector when coming from his World Economic Forum trip; this topic that even made a big national debate towards and after the Budget Speech of 2020. Leader of the private sector Gobusamang Keebine has said job creation should be led by government with policy and good governance.

"My duty as the president is to create environment for jobs to be created. I cannot open a brick manufacturing factory and employ people but i create conducive space for investors to do so and employ local people instead. I attend world summits to create space for jobs to be created,” this created a big uproar with some seeing the president to be speaking with a forked tongue in his jobs creation mandate.

Even though dishing out old statistics of the 2015/16 unemployment rate, finance minister during the Budget Speech admitted that “the unemployment rate has remained a cause for concern, at annual rate of 17.6 percent of the labour force in 2015/16.”  Opposition legislators after the budget speech were already saying Masisi is failing in job creation while some Mps from the ruling party kept the president’s stance that jobs would come with partnership with the private sector, allowing more capacity for economic activity.

Recent statistics from Statistics Botswana shows that the unemployment rate is increasing, the three months of July to September 2019 shows idleness rate of 20.7 percent for the third quarter of 2019. According to Quarterly Multi Topic Survey Labour Force Module Report- Q3 2019, the unemployed population is 194 990, with 93 190 men unemployed who are less than women who are jobless in Q3 2019 being 101 799. The unemployed population has grown by 32.5 percent in the quarter under review when compared to the preceding quarter in the Statistics Botswana records.

The unemployed population with disability increased by 7.3 percent in Q3 2019 from Q2 2019. Youth unemployment increased by 1.6 percent while youth not in education, not in employment or training rate increased by 4.7 percent. Statistics Botswana recently released its first ever quarterly labour force survey results for the three months of July to September 2019, which show an unemployment rate of 20.7 percent for that quarter.

Talking about the same sQ3 2019 results and bringing them closer to the concern of unemployment rate that seem not to be curbing according to statistics during the recent budget speech, Matsheka said the unemployment rate of 20.7 percent for the quarter cannot be directly compared with the 17.6 percent annual rate for 2015/2016. These results are for one quarter only and are subject to seasonal variations, he explained during the reading of the budget speech.

“….Successful economic diversification requires an economic growth rate that is high enough to generate sufficient jobs to address unemployment, raise household incomes and reduce poverty. This has not yet been achieved and the unemployment rate has remained a cause for concern, at annual rate of 17.6 percent of the labour force in 2015/16, according to data from Statistics Botswana. Therefore, accelerated growth, consistent with Vision 2036, will require a mix of policies that promote export diversification in goods and services to impact unemployment, especially among the youth,” said Matsheka.

 The working poor and disparities

Menial jobs or piece jobs took a larger population of the country’s employment, meaning a lot of Batswana were absorbed to work for ‘small jobs.’ The report says the largest proportion of jobs is found in the elementary occupations with 114,766 persons representing 23.7 percent of the entire labour force. This jobs were followed by occupations in the service/sales workers with 112,707 persons (23.3 percent) while professionals were at 12.7 percent or had 61,652 persons employed.

When the Statistics Botswana revealed the Q3 2019 monthly average cash by occupation it shows that monthly average cash earning by occupation professionals who were not the most employed in the population were the highest earners, recording P12 455 followed by managers and Technicians & Associate Professionals with P11,122 and P10,171.

With complaints still high that Botswana’s minimum wage is low to the benchmark, the rest of the population who are the most employed earn peanuts. Unlike their counterparts at professional level, the mostly employed in the population, elementary workers average earning is the lowest recording at P1 286.

And foreigners showed to be earning more than their Batswana counterparts with average earnings for non-citizens was estimated at P5, 117, P12, 794 and P5, 404 for all employees. The national records reveals that Fourth Quarter FSES monthly average cash earnings for Citizens was 6,206, while for 2019 QMTS was 5,117, for Non-Citizens was 20,374, from QMTS was 12,794, for all Employees was 6,533, while for QMTS was 5,404.

Foreigners got most jobs at the education sector recording 19.6 percent (3,546 persons), followed by Construction and Human Health and Social Work Activities with 17.8 (3,236 persons) and 14.1 percent (2,560 persons) respectively. In a case showing gender disparity, in almost all industries males earns more than females, this is an exception in industries like Real Estate Activities, Arts, Entertainment and Recreation, Health, Extraterritorial Organisation where women get better salaries than men.

According to Statistics Botswana, males recorded P6, 729 and for females was P4, 178 in total formal sector employment monthly average cash earnings. In total the third quarter 2019 (July to September 2019) estimated average cash earning from the 2019/20 QMTS Formal Sector Employment with the Fourth quarter 2018 Formal Sector Employment Survey (FSES) shows that there was a decrease in average earnings.

The national statistics has further seen that at industry level, Accommodation and Food Service Industry have employed more females, accounted for 70.5 percent of employees working in the industry, followed by Education with 65.7 percent. However construction and Mining & Quarrying were the two industries which have employed lowest proportion of females recording 11.3 percent and 19.3 percent of female employees.

 
Men mostly get jobs in cities and towns while their female counterparts are seen working at rural areas according to the latest statistics. But in urban areas like Gaborone and Francistown many women recorded a higher percentage in employment than males being at 51.7 percent for females as compared to 48.3 percent for males.

The capital city Gaborone recorded the highest number of people working in Formal Sector, recording 16.5 percent, followed by Kweneng East with 13.8 percent and Central Serowe with 6.2 percent and males were dominating in formal sector employment almost in all the cities according to statistics. Females were many in formal employment were recorded in all the district except Kgatleng, Ngamiland East, Kweneng East, Central Mahalapye and Kgalagadi South.

Education, skills match issue

Statistics Botswana refer to elementary jobs as “mostly unskilled” but this is also the national cry of even formal sector and businesses complaining in a report by the central bank to be receiving unskilled employees. According to Bank of Botswana’s recent Business Expectation Survey, unavailability of skilled labour was cited as the greatest challenge facing businesses in the fourth quarter of 2019, particularly in the manufacturing, trade, hotels, restaurants, transport and communications sectors3 , arising from the reported difficulties experienced in recruiting foreign skilled labour.

But do people go to school, get higher qualification and get easily hired? That is not the case in the national statistics as employers are mostly fishing in the less qualified pound. Higher education holders, higher certificates, diploma and degree holders are suffering to get jobs and it is recorded in the national statistics. Employment by education level shows that people who completed lower education or secondary school contributed 45.5 percent of the overall employment in the population.

Those who are regarded as fairly educated, the ones at university or tertiary level were at a lower percentage of the overall employment at only 15.9 percent. Primary qualifications holders were at 13.2 percent. Also when statistics reveals the issue from a sectorial perspective, the highest percentage (41.7 percent) of people in Formal Sector Employment have secondary school education. The statistics further states that these rates were followed by those with University and Primary school education with 21.5 and 10.6 percent respectively.

According to Statistics Botswana, a small percentage (0.5 percent) of people in Formal Sector Employment have apprenticeship. Statistics Botswana has shown in the same Q3 reports that youth not in education, not in employment or training rate increased by 4.7 percent.

According to Statistics Botswana, Formal Sector Employment by Industry shows that Public Administration had the largest portion of employment at 29.0 percent (140,280 persons), followed by Wholesale, Retail & Repair of Motor Vehicles with 13.5 percent (65,084 persons) and Education with 12.0 percent (58,034 persons) of total employment.

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Dark days as Aviation industry collapses

22nd November 2020
Air Botswana

As the Aviation industry takes a COVID-19 pummeling, for Africa the numbers are staggering, Chief Executive Officer of the International Air Transport Association (IATA), Alexandre de Juniac has observed.

Speaking recently at the African Airlines Association (AFRAA) has been hosting an Annual General Assembly, de Juniac said traffic is down 89% and revenue loses are expected to reach $6 billion. And this figure is likely to be revised downwards in the next forecast to be released later this month. “But the impact is much broader. The consequences of the breakdown in connectivity are severe,” he surmised.

According to de Juniac, five million African livelihoods are at risk while aviation-supported GDP could fall by as much as $37 billion. That’s a 58% fall.

“We have a health crisis. And it is evolving into a jobs and economic disaster. Fixing it is beyond the scope of what the industry can do by itself.”

He said they need governments to act, “And act fast to prevent a calamity.”

“We are in the middle of the biggest crisis our industry has ever faced. As leaders of Africa’s aviation industry, you know that firsthand. Airline revenues have collapsed. Fleets are grounded. And you are taking extreme actions just to survive. We all support efforts to contain the COVID-19 pandemic.  It is our duty and we will prevail. But policymakers must know that this has come at a great cost to jobs, individual freedoms and entire economies,” he said.

de Juniac used the AFRA general assembly platform to amplify IATA’s call for governments to address two top priorities: “The first is unblocking committed financial relief. Airlines will go bust without it. Already four African carriers have ceased operations and two are in administration. Without financial relief, many others will follow.”

Over US$31 billion in financial support has been pledged by African governments, international finance bodies and other institutions, including the African Development Bank, the African Union and the International Monetary Fund.

Unfortunately de Juniac pointed out, in his words, “Pledges do not pay the bills. And little of this funding has materialized. And let me emphasize that, while we are calling for relief for aviation, this is an investment in the future of the continent. It will need financially viable airlines to support the economic recovery from COVID-19.”

The second priority, according to IATA is to safely re-open borders using testing and without quarantines.

“People have not lost their desire to travel. Border closures and travel restrictions make it effectively impossible. Forty-four countries in Africa have opened their borders to regional and international air travel. In 20 of these countries, passengers are still subject to a mandatory 14-day quarantine. Who would travel under such conditions?” de Juniac quizzed rhetorically.

He suggested that countries should adopt systematic testing before departure provides a safe alternative to quarantine and a solution to stop the economic and social devastation being caused by COVID-19.

He admitted that it’s a frightening time for everyone, not least the millions of people whose livelihoods depend on a functioning airline industry. Right now, de Juniac said there essentially is no airline industry. He cited the example that China’s largest airlines sound optimistic, but in a vague way. “They gave no hard data about current yields, loads, or forward bookings, discussing only developments in 2019. Boy, does that seem like ages ago.”

Aviation’s darkest days

The IATA CEO said these are the darkest days in aviation’s history. “But as leaders of this great industry I know that you will share with me continued confidence in the future.

Our customers want to fly. They desire the exploration that aviation enables. They need to do international business that aviation facilitates. And they long to reunite with family and loved ones.”

He said the industry will, no doubt, be changed by this crisis, but flying will return. “Airlines will be back in the skies. The resilience of our industry has been proven many times. We will rise again,” he said.

de Juniac said Aviation is a business of freedom. “For Africa that is the freedom to develop and thrive. And that is not something people on this continent will forget or lose their desire for.”

 

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Inflation increased to 2.2% in October 2020

22nd November 2020

Headline inflation increased from 1.8 percent in September to 2.2 percent in October 2020, but remained below the lower bound of the Bank’s medium-term objective range of 3 – 6 percent, and lower than the 2.4 percent in October 2019.

According to Statistics Botswana, the increase in inflation between September and October 2020 mainly reflects the upward adjustment in domestic fuel prices {Transport (from -3.9 to -2.5 percent)}, which is estimated to have increased inflation by approximately 0.29 percentage points.

“There was also a rise in the annual price increase for most categories of goods and services: Alcoholic Beverages and Tobacco (from 6.2 to 6.6 percent); Clothing and Footwear (from 2.5 to 2.7 percent); Communications (from 0.6 to 0.9 percent); Housing, Water, Electricity, Gas and Other Fuels (from 6.4 to 6.6 percent); Recreation and Culture (from 0 to 0.2 percent); Miscellaneous Goods and Services (from 0.7 to 0.9 percent); Food & Non-Alcoholic Beverages (from 4.2 to 4.3 percent); and Furnishing, Household Equipment and Routine Maintenance (from 2 to 2.1 percent). Inflation remained stable for: Education (4.7 percent); Restaurants and Hotels (3 percent); and Health (1.5 percent). Similarly, the 16 percent trimmed mean inflation and inflation excluding administered prices rose from 1.8 percent and 3.1 percent to 2.2 percent and 3.4 percent, respectively, in the same period.”

[Source: Bank of Botswana]

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BDC injects further P64 million into Kromberg & Schubert

22nd November 2020
BDC

Botswana Development Corporation (BDC) has to date pumped a total of P100 million into the expansion of Kromberg and Schubert, a car harnessing manufacturing company, operating from Gaborone Old Naledi.

At the official ground breaking ceremony of the company‘s new warehouse today, BDC Managing Director, Cross Kgosidiile revealed the wholly state owned investment corporation has pumped P64 million into the expansion which entailed building of the new warehouse.

Kgosidiile explained that this follows another expansion project which was successfully launched in 2017, in which BDC invested P36 million, bringing the total investment into Kromberg at P100 million. The MD also acknowledged Botswana Investment and Trade Centre (BITC) as a partner in the project and for having facilitated the acquisition of the land.

 

Giving a keynote address, Minister of Investment, Trade & Industry, Peggy Serame highlighted the importance of infrastructural development in growing the local manufacturing sector and transforming the economy of Botswana.

Serame underscored the value of strategic partnerships between Government and the private sector, noting that when the two work together and pull together in one direction results will be evident and jobs will be created.

“With the prevailing conditions of depressed economy occasioned by COVID-19 pandemic, government is reliant on entities like BDC to bring in revenue and acceleration of private sector development in line with its mandate and strategic plan. This plan is supported by the need to invest in growth sectors and accelerate the implementation of the Economic Diversification Drive,” Serame said.

Minister Serame noted that the partnership between BDC and Kromberg & Schubert begun in 2017 when the P36 million, 4100 square metres factory expansion for the company was launched.

 

She said the launch of the 7320 square meters factory expansion, to be built at the tune of P64 million signals the continuation of the good partnership between the two companies.

 

“I must commend BDC for their continuous efforts to build partnerships with the private sector geared towards contributing to economic development of this country.”

 

Minister Serame also added that BITC through its robust investor aftercare programme continues to provide value added and red carpet to Kromberg and Schubert under their One Stop Service Centre.

 

“In this regard BITC facilitated acquisition of land to enable this expansion. I therefore would like to commend BITC for their timely facilitation to make this expansion possible,” the minister said.

 

Kromberg & Schubert was incorporated in Botswana in 2009; The Company has grown to asset its position as a significant player in the regional automotive industry value chain.

 

The company is also a critical player in the economic development of Botswana, it currently employs 2100 Batswana across its operations. Kromberg exports on average P2.0 billion worth of goods annually, contributing significantly to foreign exchange.

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