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Rules of Money

It is generally agreed that it takes 21 continuous days of following a similar pattern of behaviour to develop a habit. Habits can be learned and unlearned. We were all born without habits. English Philosopher John Locke is widely acclaimed for the theory of the “tabula rasa.”

In essence the theory suggests that our current habits are results of behaviours that we have learned routinely over years and years.  What we are today and what we believe in was implanted in us by interaction with the society that we live in.


The important lesson is that our beliefs, spiritual being, our fears and habits have been learned yet we were born as “tabula rasa” that is a “white clean slate”. Our contact with the environment shaped and cultured us to believe, see and behave in a particular way.


This brief lesson in Psychology directly implies and verifies that what we are a total summation of our contact with environment. The habits that we have are therefore results of interaction with our surroundings. Inherently this suggests that our money habits, attitudes, perception have therefore been learnt from somewhere whether consciously or sub-consciously.


If it has been learned therefore it can be unlearned. It is only that now you will be aware of the learning process. It is not easy to unlearn but it is simple.


We can discover new patterns of behaviour to replace our old behaviour by practicing our desired behaviours over and over until they become new habits.  If you want to be successful you can look at the documented habits of self- made millionaires and practice them until they become yours.


The idea is not to pursue the money only but we have to develop the ability to be able to keep the money. The bad money habits are therefore replaceable. We can be born again in terms of our money habits. We have to identify our new desired habits to replace the old habits.


Have you wondered why a person who has won 1 million pula end up with zero pennies in a short while?  It is simply because they got the million pula but do not possess the money mind to be able to grow or at the least preserve it. The money will vanish as fast as it came. Money management consist of thumb of rules that cannot broken.


Right from the Richest Man in Babylon to Rich Dad Poor Dad the basic and fundamental rules of money are all the same, though expressed through individual creativity. It is these rules that we are going to share today. If you started working on these rules today you will be astonished as to how the universe re-organizes to commensurate your newly found self.  


Most entrepreneurs and investors work years and years to accumulate their wealth. In the process they undergo so many money lessons that by the time they get their first million their mastery of finances is phenomenal. They have acquired over their rise to the millionaire status, million dollar habits that teaches them the essentials of money management.


They are basically products of the University of Hard Knocks and because they know the pain of losing everything they walk the balancing act of being open minded while also being protective of what they have accumulated.


The point is, ordinarily no one will be able to rise from managing a few hundreds of pulas to now managing millions of pula. Mark the word ordinarily some people possess natural frugality skills and can remarkably manage the transformation.


If you win a lottery, you have acquired the money but not the money mind. Your habits are the same and you will loose it faster than you can imagine hence why people who win lotteries end up poor again most of the time.

Today I share with you the 7 MoneyMind rules


Rule 1-Budgeting
You cannot operate without your budget because the budget gives you a guide as to how you spend your money. You can notice patterns of your spending and adjust accordingly. This rule cannot be broken if you do you will never experience abundance.


Rule 2-Give 10% away
The first 10% of the money must go to church or charity. It must be given away. This is the first rule of MoneyMind. I cannot explain it because it is spiritual. The more you give the more money you seem to attract.


Rule 3-Pay yourself first
Pay yourself first and the sufficient amount to go towards your savings throughout your lifetime is 15%. We always pay expenses and debts before we save. The attitude towards savings should be that we pay ourselves first. After giving 10% to charity you need to save 15%.


Rule 4 –Pay your household expenses
To discharge your best effectively you need the peace of mind of having paid all basic household needs such as shelter, food, clothes, transport etc. Without this you cannot maintain a positive mindframe.

Rule 5-Insure yourself and properties
Insure yourself, properties and everything that you have including life cover that will go towards your estate. If you do not insure yourself or properties you can lose everything. Insurance is very vital and stop listening to people who say otherwise.


Rule 6-Pay off your debts
Pay off your debts and debt is any loan or borrowed finances that do not bring any income. Work on a plan to gradually reduce your debts. Engage honestly with your creditors. Avoid credit cards and hire purchase agreements. Save towards your goals.


Rule 7-Invest
Invest in a business, stock or investments vehicle with returns that are better that inflation e.g. Metropolitan Life Botswana investment policies in the past ten years have offered an average of over 10% compounded annually.  

Cut out this article and remind yourself regularly about these rules. Habits are formed if you derail don’t despair you will eventually conquer you bad money habits and don on your new money habits.

This is achievable; together towards to our new money habits.

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Botswana on high red alert as AML joins Covid-19 to plague mankind

21st September 2020
Botswana-on-high-alert-as-AML-joins-Covid-19-to-plague-mankind-

This century is always looking at improving new super high speed technology to make life easier. On the other hand, beckoning as an emerging fierce reversal force to equally match or dominate this life enhancing super new tech, comes swift human adversaries which seem to have come to make living on earth even more difficult.

The recent discovery of a pandemic, Covid-19, which moves at a pace of unimaginable and unpredictable proportions; locking people inside homes and barring human interactions with its dreaded death threat, is currently being felt.

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Finance Committee cautions Gov’t against imprudent raising of debt levels

21st September 2020
Finance Committe Chairman: Thapelo Letsholo

Member of Parliament for Kanye North, Thapelo Letsholo has cautioned Government against excessive borrowing and poorly managed debt levels.

He was speaking in  Parliament on Tuesday delivering  Parliament’s Finance Committee report after assessing a  motion that sought to raise Government Bond program ceiling to P30 billion, a big jump from the initial P15 Billion.

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Gov’t Investment Account drying up fast!  

21st September 2020
Dr Matsheka

Government Investment Account (GIA) which forms part of the Pula fund has been significantly drawn down to finance Botswana’s budget deficits since 2008/09 Global financial crises.

The 2009 global economic recession triggered the collapse of financial markets in the United States, sending waves of shock across world economies, eroding business sentiment, and causing financiers of trade to excise heightened caution and hold onto their cash.

The ripple effects of this economic catastrophe were mostly felt by low to middle income resource based economies, amplifying their vulnerability to external shocks. The diamond industry which forms the gist of Botswana’s economic make up collapsed to zero trade levels across the entire value chain.

The Upstream, where Botswana gathers much of its diamond revenue was adversely impacted by muted demand in the Midstream. The situation was exacerbated by zero appetite of polished goods by jewelry manufacturers and retail outlets due to lowered tail end consumer demand.

This resulted in sharp decline of Government revenue, ballooned budget deficits and suspension of some developmental projects. To finance the deficit and some prioritized national development projects, government had to dip into cash balances, foreign reserves and borrow both externally and locally.

Much of drawing was from Government Investment Account as opposed to drawing from foreign reserve component of the Pula Fund; the latter was spared as a fiscal buffer for the worst rainy days.

Consequently this resulted in significant decline in funds held in the Government Investment Account (GIA). The account serves as Government’s main savings depository and fund for national policy objectives.

However as the world emerged from the 2009 recession government revenue graph picked up to pre recession levels before going down again around 2016/17 owing to challenges in the diamond industry.

Due to a number of budget surpluses from 2012/13 financial year the Government Investment Account started expanding back to P30 billion levels before a series of budget deficits in the National Development Plan 11 pushed it back to decline a decline wave.

When the National Development Plan 11 commenced three (3) financial years ago, government announced that the first half of the NDP would run at budget deficits.

This  as explained by Minister of Finance in 2017 would be occasioned by decline in diamond revenue mainly due to government forfeiting some of its dividend from Debswana to fund mine expansion projects.

Cumulatively since 2017/18 to 2019/20 financial year the budget deficit totaled to over P16 billion, of which was financed by both external and domestic borrowing and drawing down from government cash balances. Drawing down from government cash balances meant significant withdrawals from the Government Investment Account.

The Government Investment Account (GIA) was established in accordance with Section 35 of the Bank of Botswana Act Cap. 55:01. The Account represents Government’s share of the Botswana‘s foreign exchange reserves, its investment and management strategies are aligned to the Bank of Botswana’s foreign exchange reserves management and investment guidelines.

Government Investment Account, comprises of Pula denominated deposits at the Bank of Botswana and held in the Pula Fund, which is the long-term investment tranche of the foreign exchange reserves.

In June 2017 while answering a question from Bogolo Kenewendo, the then Minister of Finance & Economic Development Kenneth Mathambo told parliament that as of June 30, 2017, the total assets in the Pula Fund was P56.818 billion, of which the balance in the GIA was P30.832 billion.

Kenewendo was still a back bench specially elected Member of Parliament before ascending to cabinet post in 2018. Last week Minister of Finance & Economic Development, Dr Thapelo Matsheka, when presenting a motion to raise government local borrowing ceiling from P15 billion to P30 Billion told parliament that as of December 2019 Government Investment Account amounted to P18.3 billion.

Dr Matsheka further told parliament that prior to financial crisis of 2008/9 the account amounted to P30.5 billion (41 % of GDP) in December of 2008 while as at December 2019 it stood at P18.3 billion (only 9 % of GDP) mirroring a total decline by P11 billion in the entire 11 years.

Back in 2017 Parliament was also told that the Government Investment Account may be drawn-down or added to, in line with actuations in the Government’s expenditure and revenue outturns. “This is intended to provide the Government with appropriate funds to execute its functions and responsibilities effectively and efficiently” said Mathambo, then Minister of Finance.

Acknowledging the need to draw down from GIA no more, current Minister of Finance   Dr Matsheka said “It is under this background that it would be advisable to avoid excessive draw down from this account to preserve it as a financial buffer”

He further cautioned “The danger with substantially reduced financial buffers is that when an economic shock occurs or a disaster descends upon us and adversely affects our economy it becomes very difficult for the country to manage such a shock”

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