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Kgatleng chiefs warn land board

Multitudes thronged Oodi Sub Landboard to apply for the few plots available

Some Kgatleng village chiefs have warned the Kgatleng Land Board to tread carefully on the issue of recent land applications and make sure that they select wisely.


The Kgatleng Land Board froze plot applications some years back under the popular catchphrase ‘Gagona lehatshe’ but recently invited interested people to apply for residential plots in the few villages in its area of jurisdiction.


Multitudes flocked to the district this week in persuit of their land ownership dream,bringing traffic on the Mochudi and Oodi roads to a standstill, prompting the  Botswana Defence Force (BDF), Botswana Police Service choppers and Special Support Group (SSG) to rescue the situation.


This publication has gathered that Kgatleng chiefs have expressed their reservation at the current system of allocating land and believe that the allocation process should be skewed in favour of original inhabitants of the areas.


In a brief interview, Kgatleng Land Board Chairperson Peggy Gaorutwe, confirmed this but was quick to say: “I heard and understood them well but I emphasised the need to follow the law as it is clear on that issue.”


Section 14 (1) of Botswana’s Constitution states, in part, that “No person shall be deprived of his freedom of movement, and for the purposes of this section the said freedom means the right to move freely throughout Botswana, the right to reside in any part of Botswana.”


It is understood that some chiefs expressed their concerns non-residents are usually uncooperative after being allocated land as they snub kgotla meetings and often appear unruly among other reasons.


Gaorutwe said the chiefs also told her that the inhabitants, particularly the youth, have always expressed concerns that the last allocations in Kgatleng were conducted a long time back after the board’s decision to freeze allocations. They also told the board chair that the same people hardly keep the land as they sell it within few months of allocation.


The land quota system is a system very much preferred by President, Lt Gen Ian Khama, something he alluded to in Kgatleng last year after the residents expressed their concern that some people “come from afar to take their land”.


According to Khama, a portion of land should be reserved for natives. Khama suggested that 70 percent should be allocated to the “owners of the land” especially around Gaborone while 30 percent should go to the “outsiders”.


The motion was initially brought before Parliament by South East South Member of Parliament (MP) Odirile Motlhale, but was shot down by unhappy MPs who argued the practice would sow seeds of tribalism.


The Oodi case and episodes this week exposed Botswana’s unpreparedness and lack of political will to resolve the land issue. The same issues and complications always arise and expose officials’ lack of vision, proper planning and the ability to respond swiftly and effectively to challenges.


Applications were thrown on the floor willy-nilly and it is unclear what selection criteria will be used. It was clear from the onset that the first-come-first-serve system had no place.
Gaorutwe said they have a well-panned strategy on how they would deal with the applicants.


“They outnumbered our capacity, plans and expectations – brought down the fence and pushed their way in. No man would have controlled it,” she says further adding that they know what they will do.


The Tribal Land Act was reviewed in 1993 to make access to and ownership of tribal land democratic and inclusive. Botswana has unfortunately not been spared from tribal mistrust, tribal hegemony, tribal superiority and inferiority, among others.
In his latest State-of-the-Nation Adress on land, President Khama said:

“The equitable and efficient distribution of land remains an area of both great opportunity and challenge. To address the shortage of serviced land, Government shall continue to undertake land servicing projects to promote economic development. The construction of Palapye Extension 11 land servicing project is expected to yield 3300 plots upon completion. In addition we will continue with infrastructure design projects for another eight areas around the country.”


He continued: “Government is also implementing additional measures that promote optimal utilisation and better management of our land resources through physical planning; Land Administration Processes, Capacity Building and Systems (LAPCAS) Project, which has so far resulted in the surveying of 234,525 plots countrywide. A project outcome will be the establishment of a land information centre as a collection of all land data in the country.”


Khama said as of now a total of 890,814 individual land records have been opened and secured, while Deeds Registry has captured 431,667 title deeds.


“Information collected through this project will benefit individual landholders as well as the country as a whole, since registered land titles can, for example, be used as collateral for loans,” he concluded.

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Gov’t shy to shame failing ministers

22nd February 2021
Morwaeng

Minister of Presidential Affairs, Governance and Public Administration, Kabo Morwaeng together with Permanent Secretary to the President (PSP) Elias Magosi, this week refused to name and shame the worst performing Ministries and to disclose the best performing Ministries since beginning of 12th parliament including the main reasons for underperformance.

Of late there have been a litany of complaints from both ends of the aisle with cabinet members accused of providing parliament with unsatisfactory responses to the questions posed. In fact for some Botswana Democratic Party (BDP) backbenchers a meeting with the ministers and party leadership is overdue to address their complaints. Jwaneng-Mabutsane MP, Mephato Reatile is also not happy with ministers’ performance.

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Bokamoso, Gov’t in P10M womb removal suit

22nd February 2021
Bokamoso

Bokamoso Private Hospital is battling a P10 million legal suit for a botched fibroids operation which resulted in a woman losing an entire womb and her prospects of bearing children left at zero.

The same suit has also befallen the Attorney General of Botswana who is representing the Ministry of Health and Wellness for their contributory negligence of having the unlawful removal of a patient, Goitsemang Magetse’s womb.

According to the court papers, Magetse says that sometimes in November 2019, she was diagnosed with fibroids at Marina Hospital where upon she was referred to Bokamoso Private Hospital to schedule an appointment for an operation to remove the fibroids, which she did.

Magetse continues that at the instance of one Dr Li Wang, the surgeon who performed the operation, and unknown to her, an operation to remove her whole womb was conducted instead.
According to Magetse, it was only through a Marina Hospital regular check-up that she got to learn that her whole womb has been removed.

“At the while she was under the belief that only her fibroids have been removed. By doing so, the hospital has subjected itself to some serious delictual liability in that it performed a serious and life changing operation on patient who was under the belief that she was doing a completely different operation altogether. It thus came as a shock when our client learnt that her womb had been removed, without her consent,” said Magetse’s legal representatives, Kanjabanga and Associates in their summons.

The letter further says, “this is an infringement of our client‘s rights and this infringement has dire consequences on her to the extent that she can never bear children again”. ‘It is our instruction therefore, to claim as we hereby do, damages in the sum of BWP 10,000,000 (ten million Pula) for unlawful removal of client’s womb,” reads Kanjabanga Attorneys’ papers. The defendants are yet to respond to the plaintiff’s papers.

What are fibroids?

Fibroids are tumors made of smooth muscle cells and fibrous connective tissue. They develop in the uterus. It is estimated that 70 to 80 percent of women will develop fibroids in their lifetime — however, not everyone will develop symptoms or require treatment.

The most important characteristic of fibroids is that they’re almost always benign, or noncancerous. That said, some fibroids begin as cancer — but benign fibroids can’t become cancer. Cancerous fibroids are very rare. Because of this fact, it’s reasonable for women without symptoms to opt for observation rather than treatment.

Studies show that fibroids grow at different rates, even when a woman has more than one. They can range from the size of a pea to (occasionally) the size of a watermelon. Even if fibroids grow that large, we offer timely and effective treatment to provide relief.

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Masisi warned against a sinking Botswana

22nd February 2021
Ndaba GAolatlhe

The Alliance for Progressives (AP) President Ndaba Gaolathe has said that despite major accolades that Botswana continues to receive internationally with regard to the state of economy, the prospects for the future are imperilled.

Delivering his party Annual Policy Statement on Thursday, Gaolathe indicated that Botswana is in a state of do or die, and that the country’s economy is on a sick bed. With a major concern for poverty, Gaolathe pointed out that almost half of Botswana’s people are ravaged by or are about to sink into poverty.  “Our young people have lost the fire to dream about what they could become,” he said.

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