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Preview: The General: In the Service Of My Country


""Sir Donald McKinnon, former secretary general of the Commonwealth, in his foreword, described it as the compelling account of a life so well lived, with a strong political and personal legacy.
I agree. Absolutely!


In this book, Lt. Gen. Mompati Merafhe himself not only tackles a wide range of subjects from the Lesoma incident to the Central Kgalagadi Game Reserve (CKGR) issue to his relations with the private media and political opponents, but also reveals information that has never been put in public domain.


Born and raised in Serowe, his life changed dramatically when a confluence of circumstances put him in a police uniform as a Constable in pre-independence Botswana, before he was ultimately connected to the political power grid to become Botswana’s sixth vice president decades later.


The General, as he was fondly known to many, was the man, if any, to achieve such a feat. He had enormous intellectual ambition.


This book does more than tell The General’s personal story. It also traces Botswana’s history from the time he became conscious of his surroundings to the time he retired from public service in 2012 after 52 years of diligent service to the nation. To read through the first two chapters, is to be reacquainted with his humble beginnings and modest education.


There are other aspects of his early achievements as a police officer, prosecutor and army general. It is clear, for example, that he saw his task as one not of power but as a call to perform his duty “according to the will of his people and by the grace of God.”


His early days in party politics bring out the best in him. The General was no longer the combative army chief, but a rising political figure acutely aware of the political forces at play and of the pressures associated with party politics.


He shares his experiences about his maiden political campaign in Mahalapye, where he described his opponent “as a political novice of sorriest order” on the basis of the latter’s campaign methods. He says while his opponent questioned his kinship with the people of Mahalapye as he was from Serowe, he restricted his campaign pitch purely to issues of substance.


The General explains that the opposition candidate’s campaign was not based on serious self-evaluation but rather on political adventurism, adding that the latter was clearly the architect of his own defeat.


The book also takes you through his years as Botswana’s top diplomat and exceptional custodian of Botswana’s foreign policy, a task that will always be marked with distinction.  


As one commentator noted, this book is “…a wonderful store of knowledge about our beacon and guiding light in the diplomatic service, who transformed himself from being a army general to a consummate diplomat with the ability to take debates on global challenges to a higher level…”

You do not necessarily have to be knowledgeable or politically-conscious to realise that The General was one of the outstanding political figures within living memory. This book provides insight into the life of one of the most striking, interesting and influential figures of our times.


It is a story of a rare genius, who will without doubt stand high in the records of the fine achievement in the fields of Diplomacy and Leadership.


Towards the end, he shares his experiences as vice president and leader of the House. He reminisces about his exchanges with a youthful opposition politician, whom, by his own admission, did not come across as an adversary per se, but an otherwise brilliant and articulate son of the soil.


In his own words, Merafhe quips: “…it thrilled me beyond words that the free education that the BDP-led government provided was not going to waste if it could turn out products of such high intellectual acumen…”


In essence, this book gives an account of Botswana’s tireless, true patriot who will undoubtedly take his place in the roll of principled modern time leaders. No political figure in modern Botswana was ever the subject of more unremitting attention on the part of the media and social commentators. This is a refreshing and interesting read that shall leave everyone spellbound.

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Gov’t shy to shame failing ministers

22nd February 2021
Morwaeng

Minister of Presidential Affairs, Governance and Public Administration, Kabo Morwaeng together with Permanent Secretary to the President (PSP) Elias Magosi, this week refused to name and shame the worst performing Ministries and to disclose the best performing Ministries since beginning of 12th parliament including the main reasons for underperformance.

Of late there have been a litany of complaints from both ends of the aisle with cabinet members accused of providing parliament with unsatisfactory responses to the questions posed. In fact for some Botswana Democratic Party (BDP) backbenchers a meeting with the ministers and party leadership is overdue to address their complaints. Jwaneng-Mabutsane MP, Mephato Reatile is also not happy with ministers’ performance.

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Bokamoso, Gov’t in P10M womb removal suit

22nd February 2021
Bokamoso

Bokamoso Private Hospital is battling a P10 million legal suit for a botched fibroids operation which resulted in a woman losing an entire womb and her prospects of bearing children left at zero.

The same suit has also befallen the Attorney General of Botswana who is representing the Ministry of Health and Wellness for their contributory negligence of having the unlawful removal of a patient, Goitsemang Magetse’s womb.

According to the court papers, Magetse says that sometimes in November 2019, she was diagnosed with fibroids at Marina Hospital where upon she was referred to Bokamoso Private Hospital to schedule an appointment for an operation to remove the fibroids, which she did.

Magetse continues that at the instance of one Dr Li Wang, the surgeon who performed the operation, and unknown to her, an operation to remove her whole womb was conducted instead.
According to Magetse, it was only through a Marina Hospital regular check-up that she got to learn that her whole womb has been removed.

“At the while she was under the belief that only her fibroids have been removed. By doing so, the hospital has subjected itself to some serious delictual liability in that it performed a serious and life changing operation on patient who was under the belief that she was doing a completely different operation altogether. It thus came as a shock when our client learnt that her womb had been removed, without her consent,” said Magetse’s legal representatives, Kanjabanga and Associates in their summons.

The letter further says, “this is an infringement of our client‘s rights and this infringement has dire consequences on her to the extent that she can never bear children again”. ‘It is our instruction therefore, to claim as we hereby do, damages in the sum of BWP 10,000,000 (ten million Pula) for unlawful removal of client’s womb,” reads Kanjabanga Attorneys’ papers. The defendants are yet to respond to the plaintiff’s papers.

What are fibroids?

Fibroids are tumors made of smooth muscle cells and fibrous connective tissue. They develop in the uterus. It is estimated that 70 to 80 percent of women will develop fibroids in their lifetime — however, not everyone will develop symptoms or require treatment.

The most important characteristic of fibroids is that they’re almost always benign, or noncancerous. That said, some fibroids begin as cancer — but benign fibroids can’t become cancer. Cancerous fibroids are very rare. Because of this fact, it’s reasonable for women without symptoms to opt for observation rather than treatment.

Studies show that fibroids grow at different rates, even when a woman has more than one. They can range from the size of a pea to (occasionally) the size of a watermelon. Even if fibroids grow that large, we offer timely and effective treatment to provide relief.

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Masisi warned against a sinking Botswana

22nd February 2021
Ndaba GAolatlhe

The Alliance for Progressives (AP) President Ndaba Gaolathe has said that despite major accolades that Botswana continues to receive internationally with regard to the state of economy, the prospects for the future are imperilled.

Delivering his party Annual Policy Statement on Thursday, Gaolathe indicated that Botswana is in a state of do or die, and that the country’s economy is on a sick bed. With a major concern for poverty, Gaolathe pointed out that almost half of Botswana’s people are ravaged by or are about to sink into poverty.  “Our young people have lost the fire to dream about what they could become,” he said.

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