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BMC cash flow problems ignite protests

BMC makes a quick pay-out of 9 Million Pula

Several farmers in the Ghantsi Administration District recently spent a night at the Botswana Meat Commission (BMC) offices in protest of late payment of their slaughtered cattle as the cash flow of the beef exporting commission remains in the red.


The BMC had to make a quick payout of 9 Million Pula the following day as more farmers arrived the following morning demanding payments, further, mounting the pressure.


“BMC paid out nine Million Pula in two transactions, the first was made in the morning (5 Million) and the next was made in the afternoon (4 Million) on Wednesday 24 June to assist some farmers who had requested for their pay-outs that day. Beyond this, BMC has further increased its deposits to varied accounts for farmers to cash-out their vouchers on continual basis. The latter is still ongoing,” explained the Commission’s Public Relations Manager, Brian Dioka this week in response to WeekendPost questions.

On the 22nd June farmers were expecting payments, but a week leading to the set date the Commission sent out text messages and called the affected farmers informing them that their payments will be delayed or pushed back by five days due to unforeseen circumstances that needed urgent attention. This consequently meant, payments for the week 15-19 June were pushed back by a week and therefore were to be honoured as of 22nd June onward considering who supplied first.

However on the 22nd June, no payments were seemingly coming forth and farmers were getting agitated. Several of them refused to leave the BMC offices at closing time and spent the night there.

“We were reliably informed by our Extension Officers that about seven individuals spent a night at BMC offices, and this was not all Ghantsi Farmers but some,” Dioka confirmed and added that, “unfortunately some farmers came to BMC Ghantsi Offices, even though they were not first on the line to be paid-out, this therefore required BMC to adjust its payment plan to now cater for all outstanding balances regardless of prioritising according to supply, to discourage any further inconveniences.”

BMC does not only owe Ghantsi farmers, but even farmers and suppliers in other parts of the country that supplied cattle to its three abattoirs from both the commercial holdings and field-buying. However Dioka and the current Minister of Agriculture, Patrick Ralotsia, maintain that no special dispensation was done for Gantsi farmers as the payments were an already existing plan.

“No special dispensation was made to favour Ghantsi Farmers, the Commission took a decision to address the issue of some farmers in Ghantsi who at that time seemed stranded or challenged to go back to their homes given the emergent challenges of going back home. BMC has continued with its plan from June 22nd to clear all outstanding balances, and this is currently ongoing. BMC has never failed to pay its suppliers or honour payments. The only issue here is the delay, noting the above-said. Even as we speak Farmers in other parts of the country are currently being paid on a daily basis,” Dioka further explained.

The BMC liquidity has been publicly profiled and it is a well known factor that it is still recovering. This is also largely part to the outdated current operative model, which BMC has motivated for its reforms and asked for all stakeholders to be supportive of it.

The referred operative-model is designed in such a way that BMC buys non-compliant cattle from the fields or communal areas and transfers them to feedlots for a stay of 90 days (3 months), then slaughter and sell to markets which takes about 8 week, making the total waiting period of realizing sales-proceeds for such production to be 5-6 months.

Dioka says even with knowledge of the latter, some beef cattle suppliers, requires that they be paid within 21 days or even less.


“It must be noted that while at feedlots, BMC alone foots the bill for cattle feed, occupancy, transport and other logistics, further tying-up immediate cash to honour farmers payments within the shortest possible time. This is done to get the cattle to comply with slaughter and market requirements amongst other, so in simple terms, cattle bought from communal areas (which makes about 70 percent of supply to BMC) have to wait for 3 months to be slaughtered,” Dioka contended.


However the Ghantsi South Member of Parliament, Noah Salakae is of the view that communal farmers are being exploited by the Commission because they do not have an alternative market.


“People’s cattle are taken from them because they are hopeless, they do not have any other place to sell them other than BMC. They wait up to two months and even beyond for payments. Just recently the Ghantsi farmers had to spend a night at the BMC office as a last resort and they were paid the following morning. Is this what BMC has become? Is this what it takes for people to be paid for their cattle?” Salakae rhetorically commented.


Meanwhile the Minister of Agriculture, Patrick Ralotsia is optimistic that the Commission is in the right path of recovery as its cash flow has significantly improved since the take-over of new management in 2013.

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Woman swindled out of P62 000 by fake CID officers

17th June 2021
Motube

Botswana Police Service (BPS) has indicated concern about the ongoing trend where the general public falls victim to criminals purporting to be police officers.

According to BPS Assistant Commissioner, Dipheko Motube, the criminals target individuals at shopping malls and Automated Teller Machines (ATMs) where upon approaching the unsuspecting individual the criminals would pretend to have picked a substantial amount of money and they would make a proposal to the victims that the money is counted and shared in an isolated place.

“On the way, as they stop at the isolated place, they would start to count and sharing of the money, a criminal syndicate claiming to be Criminal Investigation Department (CID) officer investigating a case of stolen money will approach them,” said Motube in a statement.

The Commissioner indicated that the fake police officers would instruct the victims to hand over all the cash they have in their possession, including bank cards and Personal Identification Number (PIN), the perpetrators would then proceed to withdraw money from the victim’s bank account.

Motube also revealed that they are also investigating a case in which a 69 year old Motswana woman from Molepolole- who is a victim of the scam- lost over P62 000 last week Friday to the said perpetrators.

“The Criminal syndicate introduced themselves as CID officers investigating a case of robbery where a man accompanying the woman was the suspect.’’

They subsequently went to the woman’s place and took cash amounting to over P12 000 and further swindled amount of P50 000 from the woman’s bank account under the pretext of the further investigations.

In addition, Motube said they are currently investigating the matter and therefore warned the public to be vigilant of such characters and further reminds the public that no police officer would ask for bank cards and PINs during the investigations.

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BCP walks out of UDC meeting

15th June 2021
Boko and Saleshando

Botswana Congress Party (BCP) leadership walked out of Umbrella for Democratic Change (UDC) National Executive Committee (NEC) meeting this week on account of being targeted by other cooperating partners.

UDC meet for the first time since 2020 after previous futile attempts, but the meeting turned into a circus after other members of the executive pushed for BCP to explain its role in media statements that disparate either UDC and/or contracting parties.

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Katlholo wins against DPP

15th June 2021
DCEC DIRECTOR: Tymon Katlholo

The Director General of the Directorate on Corruption and Economic Crimes (DCEC), Tymon Katlholo’s spirited fight against the contentious transfers of his management team has forced the Office of the President to rescind the controversial decision. However, some insiders suggest that the reversal of the transfers may have left some interested parties with bruised egos and nursing red wounds.

The transfers were seen by observers as a badly calculated move to emasculate the DCEC which is seen as defiant against certain objectionable objectives by certain law enforcement agencies – who are proven decisionists with very little regard for the law and principle.

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