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Rabana case: Khama’s word vital

Ngakaagae says Sechele is conflicted in the case

It is an uphill battle for the Directorate of Public Prosecution (DPP) and Attorney General in the renewed pursuit of former Botswana Housing Corporation (BHC) deputy director, and fugitive, Gaolekwe Rabana. Rabana was charged for tender bribes.


Rabana fled Botswana almost 13 years ago whilst facing corruption charges in connection with the awarding of tenders for construction of BHC houses in Block 5. Charges against him are that he had accepted bribes in order for the tender to construct houses in Block 5 to be awarded to a construction company that did not qualify for the bid.

The State alleged that, in return for that, Rabana was given air tickets for him and his family to fly to Europe and America as well as money for accommodation in luxury hotels. He fled the country when the state was left with only two witnesses to call.


The Directorate on Corruption and Economic Crime then set out to find him and finally traced him to Johannesburg where he is reported to be residing with his family. After he was located, he refused to return to Botswana to face trial and this led to his extradition trial.


Gaborone attorney, Kgosiitsile Ngakaagae, who is representing Rabana challenges the extradition and wants to nullify the case. He has advised that the prosecution does not have, or has ceased to have legal basis.

According to court papers submitted at the Francistown High Court recently, Ngakaagae, through his client argues that, Director of Public Prosecutions, Leornard Sechele who was the presiding magistrate cannot be the judge in his own case.


According to the documents, Rabana is seeking relief from the case on the grounds that the Sechele is now pursuing him and on the other hand in charge of his prosecution and therefore is conflicted. “Sechele was and remains, for all intents and purposes, the presiding magistrate.

All the seventeen witnesses called in that trial testified before him as the presiding officer. Before he assumed other career interests he was a judicial officer in particular a Chief magistrate. The trial, including all seventeen witnesses was concluded before and is pending before him,” he said.


Furthermore, “That means that his Excellency the President will have to appoint him as such. Essentially he will have to take leave from DPP office or quit his job as such so as to be able to try Rabana and take the matter to its logical Conclusion,” argues the lawyer.


They further argue that alternatively, Sechele would have to wait for his contract to expire and then shift roles from being the prosecutor to a magistrate, if he is appointed as such.


“The unfairness of the aforementioned inevitable scenario is self-evident. One cannot fairly be a judge in their own case or in a case they are prosecuting or have prosecuted or have been involved in some way in a prosecutorial capacity,” argues Ngakaagae and his client. This they say is for the reasons that a prosecution must take some particular views about a suspect or an accused person even if on a prima facie basis.


“While a Magistrate, Sechele only had access to what was placed before him within the context of the judicial proceedings but now he has access to everything, admissible or inadmissible that forms part of the prosecution docket. His position has compromised him gravely and irremediably,” the applicants change.


According to the documents, Sechele is no longer legally competent to return to his former function to adjudicate over the matter saying the two offices are irreconcilable. “Given that the proceedings are no longer competent it is imperative that the record of proceedings be set aside,” they argued.


Rabana and his lawyer further challenge the legality of the case, citing section 26 of the Criminal Procedure and Evidence Act that states that the right of prosecution for any other offence except murder is barred by 20 years.

“The situation is exacerbated by the fact that it is now many years since trial started and since the last witness ceased to testify. The court’s recollection of the verbatim narrative of the witness has surely since faded,” Rabana stated.


The then Gaborone Chief Magistrate and now Director of the DPP, Sechele, presided over the matter whilst current Lobatse High Court Judge, Leatile Dambe, prosecuted. The trial suffered setbacks around 2001 when both the prosecutor and presiding officer went for studies overseas.

The case had to wait for their return before it could continue, hence the mix up. The case began in 1991 but was registered in 1995 and commenced in 2002 and faced challenges when it was nearing its end.

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Over 2 000 civil servants interdicted

6th December 2022

Over 2,000 civil servants in the public sector have been interdicted for a variety of reasons, the majority of which are criminal in nature.

According to reports, some officers have been under interdiction for more than two years because such matters are still being investigated. Information reaching WeekendPost shows that local government, particularly councils, has the highest number of suspended officers.

In its annual report, the Directorate on Corruption and Economic Crime (DCEC) revealed that councils lead in corrupt activities throughout the country, and dozens of council employees are being investigated for alleged corrupt activities. It is also reported that disciplined forces, including the Botswana Defence Force (BDF), police, and prisons, and the Directorate of Intelligence and Security (DIS) have suspended a significant number of officers.

The Ministry of Education and Skills Development has also recorded a good number of teachers who have implicated in love relationships with students, while some are accused of impregnating students both in primary and secondary school. Regional education officers have been tasked to investigate such matters and are believed to be far from completion as some students are dragging their feet in assisting the investigations to be completed.

This year, Mmadinare Senior Secondary reportedly had the highest number of pregnancies, especially among form five students who were later forcibly expelled from school. Responding to this publication’s queries, Permanent Secretary to the Office of the President Emma Peloetletse said, “as you might be aware, I am currently addressing public servants across the length and breadth of our beautiful republic. Due to your detailed enquiry, I am not able to respond within your schedule,” she said.

She said some of the issues raised need verification of facts, some are still under investigation while some are still before the courts of law.

Meanwhile, it is close to six months since the Police Commissioner Keabetwe Makgophe, Director General of the Directorate on Corruption and Economic Crime (DCEC) Tymon Katlholo and the Deputy Director of the DIS Tefo Kgothane were suspended from their official duties on various charges.

Efforts to solicit comment from trade unions were futile at the time of going to press.

Some suspended officers who opted for anonymity claimed that they have close to two years while on suspension. One stated that the investigations that led him to be suspended have not been completed.

“It is heartbreaking that at this time the investigations have not been completed,” he told WeekendPost, adding that “when a person is suspended, they get their salary fully without fail until the matter is resolved”.

Makgophe, Katlholo and Kgothane are the three most high-ranking government officials that are under interdiction.

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Masisi to dump Tsogwane?

28th November 2022

Botswana Democratic Party (BDP) and some senior government officials are abuzz with reports that President Mokgweetsi Masisi has requested his Vice President, Slumber Tsogwane not to contest the next general elections in 2024.

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African DFIs gear to combat climate change

25th November 2022

The impacts of climate change are increasing in frequency and intensity every year and this is forecast to continue for the foreseeable future. African CEOs in the Global South are finally coming to the party on how to tackle the crisis.

Following the completion of COP27 in Egypt recently, CEOs of Africa DFIs converged in Botswana for the CEO Forum of the Association of African Development Finance Institutions. One of the key themes was on green financing and building partnerships for resource mobilization in financing SDGs in Africa

A report; “Weathering the storm; African Development Banks response to Covid-19” presented shocking findings during the seminar. Among them; African DFI’s have proven to be financially resilient, and they are fast shifting to a green transition and it’s financing.

COO, CEDA, James Moribame highlighted that; “Everyone needs food, shelter and all basic needs in general, but climate change is putting the achievement of this at bay. “It is expensive for businesses to do business, for instance; it is much challenging for the agricultural sector due to climate change, and the risks have gone up. If a famer plants crops, they should be ready for any potential natural disaster which will cost them their hard work.”

According to Moribame, Start-up businesses will forever require help if there is no change.

“There is no doubt that the Russia- Ukraine war disrupted supply chains. SMMEs have felt the most impact as some start-up businesses acquire their materials internationally, therefore as inflation peaks, this means the exchange rate rises which makes commodities expensive and challenging for SMMEs to progress. Basically, the cost of doing business has gone up. Governments are no longer able to support DFI’s.”

Moribame shared remedies to the situation, noting that; “What we need is leadership that will be able to address this. CEOs should ensure companies operate within a framework of responsible lending. They also ought to scout for opportunities that would be attractive to investors, this include investors who are willing to put money into green financing. Botswana is a prime spot for green financing due to the great opportunity that lies in solar projects. ”

Technology has been hailed as the economy of the future and thus needs to be embraced to drive operational efficiency both internally and externally.

Executive Director, bank of Industry Nigeria, Simon Aranou mentioned that for investors to pump money to climate financing in Africa, African states need to be in alignment with global standards.

“Do what meets world standards if you want money from international investors. Have a strong risk management system. Also be a good borrower, if you have a loan, honour the obligation of paying it back because this will ensure countries have a clean financial record which will then pave way for easier lending of money in the future. African states cannot just be demanding for mitigation from rich countries. Financing needs infrastructure to complement it, you cannot be seating on billions of dollars without the necessary support systems to make it work for you. Domestic resource mobilisation is key. Use public money to mobilise private money.” He said.

For his part, the Minster of Minister of Entrepreneurship, Karabo Gare enunciated that, over the past three years, governments across the world have had to readjust their priorities as the world dealt with the effects and impact of the COVID 19 pandemic both to human life and economic prosperity.

“The role of DFIs, during this tough period, which is to support governments through countercyclical measures, including funding of COVID-19 related development projects, has become more important than ever before. However, with the increasingly limited resources from governments, DFIs are now expected to mobilise resources to meet the fiscal gaps and continue to meet their developmental mandates across the various affected sectors of their economies.” Said Gare.

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