Connect with us
Advertisement

Patients asked to bring 20 litters of water

Greater Gaborone surpasses supply by 18 Million litres a day

The scarcity of clean water in the southern parts of the country has reached critical levels such that expectant mothers are required to bring their own buckets full of water upon admission in some government clinics to be used after delivery.


The Ministry of Health has confirmed that the unreliable water supply which the country has been experiencing  for a couple of months now, has virtually paralysed operations in some health facilities, forcing relatives and friends of the patients under hospitalisation to bring water from home for bathing and drinking.


“It is not the woman in labour who is asked to bring water, but those who are visiting her. What we are doing is partnership. It is the responsibility of the health facility to provide what needs to be provided. But the current situation calls for what we call mabogo dinku a a thebana (literally meaning to help each other) state of affairs. Asking the guardians to bring water for patients is one of the quickest ways of addressing the current water supply situation,” explained the chief Public Relations Officer in the Ministry of Health, Doreen Motshegwa in an interview this week.


Lesirane clinic and Nkoyaphiri clinics in the Thamaga/Mogoditshane sub District are some of the clinics which have been experiencing challenges in maternity wards due to water scarcity as the Water Utilities water bowsers are not keeping up with the demand. For instance on a monthly basis, Lesirane clinic receives around seventy patients in the maternity ward and many other patients in the out-patient section whose demand for water is overwhelming the bowser supply by the Water Utilities.


“The clinic is very busy. It is a 24 hour health centre with many patients. The water is used to flush toilets, for cleaning and drinking as well. So a single Jojo tank cannot keep up with the demand. That is why we have been requesting for cooperation from the people. Nobody is forced to bring the water, but when the relatives do bring water for the patient, that water will only be used by that patient. It is not to be shared with others,” Motshegwa further explained.


Lesirane clinic is a catchment health facility for Block 7, Tsolamosese, Mokole and part of Nkayaphiri population. Some of the people living in these areas get water from public standpipes as the water has not yet been connected to private homes.


“When my daughter went on labour last night we hired a taxi to take her to the clinic, but I was shocked when we were told to bring 20 litres of water! I do not have a car and I had to go and queue at the standpipe in the middle of the night so that she and the baby can be cleaned,” explained one resident.


As of Tuesday this week other major villages in the greater Gaborone such as Mmopane, Metsimotlhabe, Gabane, Tloaneng and Bokaa did not have water at all. Other major villages such a Mochudi, Tlokweng and Kumakwane were receiving water at very low pressure.


Information from the Water Utilities Corporation suggests that the greater Gaborone areas are demanding more water than the corporation can supply at the moment.


“The greater Gaborone area’s average demand surpasses supply by 17.9 million litres a day. Due to this, the area will continue to experience low pressure to no water supply even outside the rationing schedule,” a WUC report revealed this week.


WUC maintains that the cause is due to the layout of the water network which is not efficient in bringing water from the northern part of the city to the Southern part for redistribution.


Most areas that are affected are those who were supplied by the Gaborone and Bokaa Dams which are currently dry. Other areas in the South which did not have water this week included, Lobatse, Molapowabojang and Kgomokasitwa.


Meanwhile,as people continue to grapple with inadequate water supply, the Political wing of government is not promising any immediate solution to the problem. Water rationing continues whilst people are told to wait for rain.

Continue Reading

News

Free at last: Ian Kirby Speaks Out

6th December 2021
Justice Ian Kirby

The outgoing President of the Court of Appeal, Justice Ian Kirby, shares his thoughts with us as he leaves the Bench at the end of this year.

WeekendPost: Why did you move between the Attorney General and the Bench?

Ian Kirby: I was a member of the Attorney General’s Chambers three times- first in 1969 as Assistant State Counsel, then in 1990 as Deputy Attorney General (Civil), and finally in 2004 as Attorney General. I was invited in 2000 by the late Chief Justice Julian Nganunu to join the Bench. I was persuaded by former President Festus Mogae to be his Attorney General in 2004 as, he said, it was my duty to do so to serve the nation. I returned to the Judiciary as soon as I could – in May 2006, when there was a vacancy on the High Court Bench.

This content is locked

Login To Unlock The Content!

Continue Reading

News

Civil society could rescue Botswana’s flawed democracy’ 

6th December 2021
Parliament

Botswana’s civil society is one of the non-state actors that could save the country’s democracy from sliding into regression, a Germany based think tank has revealed.  This is according to a discussion paper by researchers at the German Development Institute who analysed the effects of e-government usage on political attitudes In Botswana.

In the paper titled “E-government and democracy in Botswana: Observational and experimental evidence on the effects of e-government usage on political attitudes,” the researchers offer a strongly worded commentary on Botswana’s ‘flawed democracy.’  The authors noted that with Botswana’s Parliament structurally – and in practice – feeble, the potential for checks and balances on executive power rests with the judiciary.

This content is locked

Login To Unlock The Content!

Continue Reading

News

Bangwato at loggerheads over Moshupa trip

6th December 2021

Bangwato in Serowe — where Bamagwato Paramount Chief and former President Lt. Gen Ian Khama originates – disagree on whether they must send a delegation to dialogue with President Mokgweetsi Masisi’s family in Moshupa. Just last week, a meeting was called by the Regent of Bamagwato, Kgosi Sediegeng Kgamane, at Serowe Kgotla to, among others, update the tribe on the whereabouts of their Kgosi (Khama). 

Further, his state of health was also discussed, with Kgamane telling the attendees that all is well with Khama. The main reason for the meeting was to deliberate on the escalating tension between Khama and Masisi — a three-year bloodletting going unabated.

This content is locked

Login To Unlock The Content!

Continue Reading
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!