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Botswana Railways vulnerable to fraud – Audit

A recent audit report on the Botswana Railways (BR) points to violations of International Accounting Standards (IAS), poor internal controls and disregard for laid down company procedures and policies. All these maladies have exposed the organisation to incorrect information that distorts its financial position, and more worryingly left the company vulnerable to fraud.

The auditors took concern with what appeared to be a large variance between the financial statement presented and the trial balance, querying as to why there seems to be an overstatement of the operating costs and understatement of Administration, Marketing and Other Expenses, relative to the figures shown in the trial balance.

The operating costs were overstated by P2 867 550.18 and the Administration, Marketing and Other Expenses understated by P2 869 759.25. The differences, according to the auditors, could be the opposite of true and fair representation of the financial statements.

In response to the query,  The management of BR posited that the difference were due to them rounding off figures to the nearest thousand, however they admitted to wrongfully classifying certain classes and they countered by offering new figures which have been reclassified accordingly albeit lower than what they had initial claimed.

As one peruses the audit report it then becomes clearer as to why there has been errors and misstatements that passed through without being identified and corrected. The auditors laid bare their concern regarding an internal audit plan which was not fully executed due to understaffing.

The BR organisational structure entails four employees under the Internal audit manager, but that was not the case as they lost two internal auditors in 2014, one in August and the other in November, leaving internal controls lax as planned audits could not be completed. It took BR an average of 4 months to appoint each internal auditor, effectively meaning the internal audit was understaffed for 8 months. In mitigation, the BR says all areas which were not audited for the financial year under review have been carried forward to 2015/2016 and are in the process of being finalised.

NO REGARD FOR INTERNATIONAL ACCOUNTING STANDARDS

The audit report has also uncovered what seemingly appears to be lack of regard for International Accounting Standards (IAS) as BR violated the standards on more than one occasion. In one instance, the auditors noted that the lack of adherence to some provisions of IAS 20 meant that the Deferred Grants account is misstated by the unrecognised costs related to the items that the grants were intended for. The auditors also found out that the railway company was in violation of IAS 2, the fundamental principle being that inventories are required to be stated at the lower of cost and net realisable value.

A discussion between auditors and management revealed that all inventory is stated at cost. The closing balance for inventories was P73, 267, 796.97, none compliance to IAS 2 means that the inventory may be overstated. In perhaps the most perplexing violation of the basic IAS 1 which governs the presentation of financial statements, BR failed to separate deferred lease rental into current and non-current liabilities resulting in long term liabilities overstated by P1 175 000.00, which should have been classified as current liabilities.

In several findings, the auditors picked up cases of misallocation of assets which could result in misstatements. The Asset Replacement Reserve (Equity) account is represented by the Asset Replacement Fund Investment (Asset) account. It was revealed that in the reserve account funds not utilised stood at P52 808 610.03 as at 31 March 2015, however the investment account as at the same date shows that the funds available are P25 111 653.72, leaving a difference of P27 696 957.21, which lead the auditors to posit that there is a possible misstatement of that difference in the reserves account.

Furthermore they advised the BR management to reconcile the two accounts by updating the reserve account with the transactions that occurred since the account was last updated so it reflects the actual funds available to the company. The management said it will refer back to its journal to equate the two. Similarly, the auditors’ report that the General Insurance Reserve Account and the Accident Reserve Account have balances of P57 508 459.96 and P25 111 653.72, which means the transactions that appear occur in the Accident reserve fund are not captured in the General Insurance Reserve account resulting in the account to be stagnant from previous period hence a possible overstatement of about P32 396 806.24. Management has since undertaken to equate the two accounts so they reflect the true funds available.

LACK OF PROPER CONTROLS AT BOTSWANA RAILWAYS

The lack of proper controls at BR, particularly on procurement could put them in a collision path with their suppliers. In the Audit report, it was revealed that BR risks running out of fuel due to late delivery from suppliers, moreover it was revealed that on two occasions they received more fuel than they have ordered, in other instances the quantity delivered did not match the invoice order, with some extra quantity not paid for.

This opens the organisation to unnecessary liabilities and expenses as well as disputes with suppliers. In another startling revelation, the BR purchased goods worth P239, 217.56 in August 2013 of which auditors found the goods are still yet to be reported as received. Furthermore there is no documentation indicating any follow up attempts by BR for the delayed delivery of goods.

In a shocking twist, it was noted that BR has not adhered to the Finance and Accounts Manual which requires the supplies department to take a physical count of stock items on a regular basis such that all items are counted at least once a year, and some are counted frequently. Therefore stocks worth P8, 848, 152.47 were not counted, leaving the country vulnerable to misstatements of true value as some of the uncounted stock could have been damaged or stolen.

Further compounding the matter was the likelihood that BR could have lost some assets as the organisation again went against its Finance and Accounts Manual Volume which allows for the verification of fixed assets to be undertaken every alternate year under the guise of Chief Internal Auditor and representatives of the concerned departments. This is done to verify actual assets in hand and value.

But it was revealed to the auditors that BR did not carry out physical asset verification exercises in 2013/2014 and 2014/2015. Therefore the condition and existence of some assets cannot be ascertained. It was also noted that BR has no asset management policy hence assets maybe be over-valued by obsolete assets and inventory.

ACCUMULATION OF NEGATIVE LEAVE BALANCES

In an apparent violation of the General Condition of Service, chapter 10, paragraph 1(a) which act as a guide to leave days other than sick leaves, it was found that five employees have negative leave balances, which BR is still to provide reasons for the accumulation of negative leave balances. The audit report notes that provision for leave Pay has therefore been understated by P236, 697.43 due to negative leave balances.

According to the auditors, BR’s revenue system has several shortcomings; it has a weakness of freezing and hanging on invoices while the user is still transacting, in some cases counter sales report omits invoices that have been processed during the day resulting in cash deposit being more than the counter sales report, and even for invoices that have been printed, sometimes they don’t appear in Small Bank report such that cash deposited for the day is more or less than the invoices processed for the day.

The system is also known to prevent an invoice from showing in both the counter sales report and the Small Bank report. As a result, the system opens the organisation to various risks. “Completeness of revenue cannot be ascertained when there are gaps in invoice sequence and sales report and revenue cut-off is challenged due to some invoices showing on later periods,” stated the report.

Other controversial findings in the audit report have put sharp focus on the finance department’s lackadaisical approach in handling of accounts, sparking fear of possible embezzlement and fraud. The fears arise as a result of the organisation’s poorly prepared bank reconciliations. As per normal procedure, monthly bank reconciliations are prepared by an accounts officer, then proceed to be checked by the supervisor or the financial accountant who then passes it to the finance manager to review the bank reconciliation.

However, the findings point to a different reality as eight bank accounts belonging to the organisation have been checked but not reviewed. “It was discovered during audit that these controls are not consistently adhered to as shown,” noted the report which then proceeded to warn BR that fraud and misappropriation of funds may not be detected if controls are not adhered to.

The report also revealed that some supporting documents differ from bank reconciliation, in this case the bank reconciliation and the cash book reconciliation statement had variances that were picked by auditors. The cash book reconciliation is a system generated report that shows unpresented cheques, unpresented deposit and the month end balance.

The unpresented cheques and unpresented deposit figures in the bank reconciliation should be same as those in the cashbook reconciliation statement but the differences for unpresented deposit for January was at P251, 198.87 while the unpresented cheques for the same period showed a difference of P250, 913.88.

POORLY MAINTAINED ACCOUNTS

Furthermore, some accounts have not been properly maintained giving leeway to funds misappropriation. In one case it was found that the interbank transfer clearing account for the month of March 2015 was not maintained, the account should have a zero balance at any point but it had P139, 080.24, prompting auditors to say cash recorded in this account might not belong to Botswana Railways.

Another account was poorly maintained as it had gone for months with neither bank reconciliation nor cash book reconciliation to support bank reconciliation as a result amounts might have been incorrectly recorded in the wrong account and wrong period. There was a wrong classification concerning the Sea Rail Botswana account which classified the amount of P1, 732, 741.2 as cash at the bank and on hand even though this money had been transferred into another Sea Rail account in Namibia, a subsidiary of Botswana Railways.

Therefore there was a misstatement in the Botswana account while the one in Namibia was understated.  

Botswana Railways also fumbled in other financial transactions, the spotlight being on accounts payable control among other transactions. It was revealed in the audit report that the payable control was overstated by P398, 250.50 as the money was paid out to the supplier but yet it was still reflected as outstanding. Moreover a payment that was made to the tune of $10, 491.61 was shown as being outstanding despite it being paid.

The railway company also failed to convert a provisional amount of R13, 835, 174.84 to pulas thus the overstatement of the sundry creditors account due to the difference between the rand and the pula equivalent. It has since been revealed that the organisation’s policies have not been followed especially by the tender committee which has the habit of acting beyond its scope.

The committee can only deal with tenders up to the limit of P250, 000.00 but it has since been revealed that they engaged a leading audit firm for services totalling P296, 926.56, a clear violation that flies in the face of the organisation’s laid down procedures. “If policies are not followed, the organisation may be susceptible to fraud and mismanagement of funds” read part of the report. It has been noted that there is no documentation to substantiate the engagement of that particular audit firm.

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Masisi to dump Tsogwane?

28th November 2022

Botswana Democratic Party (BDP) and some senior government officials are abuzz with reports that President Mokgweetsi Masisi has requested his Vice President, Slumber Tsogwane not to contest the next general elections in 2024.

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African DFIs gear to combat climate change

25th November 2022

The impacts of climate change are increasing in frequency and intensity every year and this is forecast to continue for the foreseeable future. African CEOs in the Global South are finally coming to the party on how to tackle the crisis.

Following the completion of COP27 in Egypt recently, CEOs of Africa DFIs converged in Botswana for the CEO Forum of the Association of African Development Finance Institutions. One of the key themes was on green financing and building partnerships for resource mobilization in financing SDGs in Africa

A report; “Weathering the storm; African Development Banks response to Covid-19” presented shocking findings during the seminar. Among them; African DFI’s have proven to be financially resilient, and they are fast shifting to a green transition and it’s financing.

COO, CEDA, James Moribame highlighted that; “Everyone needs food, shelter and all basic needs in general, but climate change is putting the achievement of this at bay. “It is expensive for businesses to do business, for instance; it is much challenging for the agricultural sector due to climate change, and the risks have gone up. If a famer plants crops, they should be ready for any potential natural disaster which will cost them their hard work.”

According to Moribame, Start-up businesses will forever require help if there is no change.

“There is no doubt that the Russia- Ukraine war disrupted supply chains. SMMEs have felt the most impact as some start-up businesses acquire their materials internationally, therefore as inflation peaks, this means the exchange rate rises which makes commodities expensive and challenging for SMMEs to progress. Basically, the cost of doing business has gone up. Governments are no longer able to support DFI’s.”

Moribame shared remedies to the situation, noting that; “What we need is leadership that will be able to address this. CEOs should ensure companies operate within a framework of responsible lending. They also ought to scout for opportunities that would be attractive to investors, this include investors who are willing to put money into green financing. Botswana is a prime spot for green financing due to the great opportunity that lies in solar projects. ”

Technology has been hailed as the economy of the future and thus needs to be embraced to drive operational efficiency both internally and externally.

Executive Director, bank of Industry Nigeria, Simon Aranou mentioned that for investors to pump money to climate financing in Africa, African states need to be in alignment with global standards.

“Do what meets world standards if you want money from international investors. Have a strong risk management system. Also be a good borrower, if you have a loan, honour the obligation of paying it back because this will ensure countries have a clean financial record which will then pave way for easier lending of money in the future. African states cannot just be demanding for mitigation from rich countries. Financing needs infrastructure to complement it, you cannot be seating on billions of dollars without the necessary support systems to make it work for you. Domestic resource mobilisation is key. Use public money to mobilise private money.” He said.

For his part, the Minster of Minister of Entrepreneurship, Karabo Gare enunciated that, over the past three years, governments across the world have had to readjust their priorities as the world dealt with the effects and impact of the COVID 19 pandemic both to human life and economic prosperity.

“The role of DFIs, during this tough period, which is to support governments through countercyclical measures, including funding of COVID-19 related development projects, has become more important than ever before. However, with the increasingly limited resources from governments, DFIs are now expected to mobilise resources to meet the fiscal gaps and continue to meet their developmental mandates across the various affected sectors of their economies.” Said Gare.

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TotalEnergies Botswana launches Road safety campaign in Letlhakeng

22nd November 2022

Letlhakeng:TotalEnergies Botswana today launched a Road Safety Campaign as part of their annual Stakeholder Relationship Management (SRM), in partnership with Unitrans, MVA Fund, TotalEnergies Letlhakeng Filling Station and the Letlhakeng Sub District Road Safety Committee during an event held in Letlhakeng under the theme, #IamTrafficToo.

The Supplier Relationship Management initiative is an undertaking by TotalEnergies through which TotalEnergie annually explores and implements social responsibility activities in communities within which we operate, by engaging key stakeholders who are aligned with the organization’s objectives. Speaking during the launch event, TotalEnergies’ Operations and HSSEQ,   Patrick Thedi said,  “We at TotalEnergies pride ourselves in being an industrial operator with a strategy centered on respect, listening, dialogue and stakeholder involvement, and a partner in the sustainable social and economic development of its host communities and countries. We are also very fortunate to have stakeholders who are in alignment with our organizational objectives. We assess relationships with our key stakeholders to understand their concerns and expectations as well as identify priority areas for improvement to strengthen the integration of Total Energies in the community. As our organization transitions from Total to Total Energies, we are committed to exploring sustainable initiatives that will be equally indicative of our growth and this Campaign is a step in the right direction. ”

As part of this campaign roll out, stakeholders  will be refurbishing and upgrading and installing road signs around schools in the area, and generally where required. One of the objectives of the Campaign is to bring awareness and training on how to manage and share the road/parking with bulk vehicles, as the number of bulk vehicles using the Letlhakeng road to bypass Trans Kalahari increases. When welcoming guests to Letlhakeng, Kgosi Balepi said he welcomed the initiative as it will reduce the number of road incidents in the area.

Also present was District Traffic Officer ASP, Reuben Moleele,  who gave a statistical overview of accidents in the region, as well as the rest of the country. Moleele applauded TotalEnergies and partners on the Campaign, especially ahead of the festive season, a time he pointed out is always one with high road statistics. The campaign name #IamTrafficToo, is a reminder to all road users, including pedestrians that they too need to be vigilant and play their part in ensuring a reduction in road incidents.

The official proceedings of the day included a handover of reflectors and stop/Go signs to the Letlhakeng Cluster from TotalEnerigies, injury prevention from tips from MVA’s Onkabetse Petlwana, as  well as  bulk vehicle safety tips delivered from Adolf Namate of Unitrans.

TotalEnergies, which is committed to having zero carbon emissions by 2050,  has committed to rolling out the Road safety Campaign to the rest of the country in the future.

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