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Mokgware cautions Gov’t on soldiers, Youth

Member of Parliament (MP) for Gabane-Mankgodi, Major General Pius Mokgware has told government that the escalating number of unemployed youth and angry soldiers at the barracks pose a great threat to the security and economy of the country.

Debating the budget for Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture presented by Thapelo Olopeng in Parliament this week, Mokgware said that the youth are slowly becoming frustrated and disgruntled as the government is failing to create decent jobs for them.

“Madam Speaker, I am really concerned about our young people who continue to loiter around the streets with nothing to do. This is a testimony that the interventions by the government to tackle unemployment have proved futile,” he said.

General Mokgware told Parliament that educated and jobless youth can be an easy target for terrorists. “We have IT graduates who lead the pack of unemployed graduates.

These people can be recruited by terrorists to develop software and viruses in order to hack our computers, destabilise water and electricity systems and destroy this country in the blink of an eye,” he cautioned. Mokgware reiterated that if the mounting problem of youth unemployment is not taken care of, young people may divert their energies to cyber warfare and use their expertise to the advantage of terrorist organisations like Boko Haram, al Queda and al Shabaab.

“We invest a lot in our education sector but I am disappointed that we cannot create decent jobs for these graduates. Majority of them are underemployed and exploited through programmes like internship and graduate volunteer scheme. Our country is in danger because these people can use their vast knowledge and skills to shut down the traffic lights and railway system as it once happened in London about eleven years ago,” he added.

Mokgware, the retired commander of the BDF ground forces observed that many young people across the country are becoming militant and radicalised, a development he said may spell doom for the country. He said violent youth who continue to terrorise people in Palapye, Thamaga, Molepolole and Kanye were just a tip of the iceberg.

He further told Parliament that Botswana should be warry of cyber spying and espionage saying that in many countries it was the idle youth who were at the helm of such activities. In addition, he said, drug lords and mafias can end up using the youth to distribute their harmful products in schools and in the end this could impact on the country’s health system as the country will have to build many rehabilitation centres.

“Rural-urban migration is on the rise and the skyrocketing unemployment could trigger riots and increase crime statistics,” he further remarked.

Mokgware suggested that the government should engage the private sector in creating employment for the youth instead of “starving the private sector as it even decided not to engage it in the Economic Stimulus Program.”

He called on the government to provide full time employment for special constables and temporary teachers.

He also blasted Botswana Qualification Authority (BQA) doubting the accreditation capacity of the institution as it was not affiliated to any international body. He said the country has the capability to export its graduates to other developing countries like South Sudan but that was impossible as the local universities were producing half-baked graduates.

Contributing to the budget of Ministry of Security, Defence and Security, Mokgware alleged that members of disciplined forces were not happy with their welfare.

“An angry soldier is a threat to the country as he is capable of doing anything,” he debated in Parliament.

Mokgware implored the government to improve the welfare of soldiers, police officers and prison warders including providing them with decent housing and regular reviews of their salaries.

Meanwhile, the second meeting of the second session of the 11th Parliament ended this week with members debating and approving the national budget which was presented by Minister of Finance and Development planning, Kenneth Mathambo last month.

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Transgender persons in Botswana live a miserable life

23rd November 2020
Transgender persons

An international report complied in South Africa dubbed ‘Legal Gender Recognition in Botswana’ says that the transgender and gender non-conforming people in Botswana live a miserable life. The community experiences higher levels of discrimination, violence and ill health.

In this report, it has been indicated that this is because their gender identity, which does not conform to narrowly define societal norms, renders them more vulnerable. Gender identity is a social determinant of health, which means that it is a factor that influences people’s health via their social context, their communities and their experiences of social exclusion. The Ministry of Health and Wellness has recognized this, and transgender people are considered a vulnerable population under the Botswana Second National Strategic Framework for HIV and AIDS 2010-2017.

In a recent study that shed light on the lived experiences of transgender and gender non-conforming people in Botswana, transgender persons often experience discrimination because of their gender identity and expression. The study was conducted by the University of Cape Town, LEGABIBO, BONELA, as well as Rainbow Identity Association and approved by the Health Ministry as well as the University of Botswana.

Of the 77 transgender and gender non-conforming people who participated in the study, less than half were employed. Two thirds, which is approximately 67% said that they did not have sufficient funds to cover their everyday needs. Two in five had hidden health concerns from their healthcare provider because they were afraid to disclose their gender identity.

More than half said that because of their gender identity, they had been treated disrespectfully at a healthcare facility (55%), almost half (46%) said they had been insulted at a healthcare facility, and one quarter (25%) had been denied healthcare because of their gender identity.

At the same time, the ‘Are we doing right’ study suggests that transgender and non-conforming people might be at higher risks of experiencing violence and mental ill-health, compared to the general population. More than half had experienced verbal embarrassment because of their gender identity, 48% had experienced physical violence and more than one third (38%) had experienced sexual violence.

The study showed that mental health concerns were high among transgender and gender non-conforming people in Botswana. Half of the transgender and gender non-conforming study participants (53%) showed signs of depression. Between one in four and one in six showed signs of moderate or severe anxiety (22% among transgender women, 24% among transgender men and 17% among gender non-conforming people).

Further, the study revealed that many had attempted suicide: one in three transgender women (32%), more than one in three transgender men (35%) and three in five gender non-conforming people (61%).

International research, as well as research from Botswana, suggests that not being able to change one’s gender marker has a negative impact on access to healthcare and mental health and wellbeing. The study further showed that one in four transgender people in Botswana (25%) had been denied access to healthcare. This is, at least in part, linked to not being able to change one’s gender marker in the identity documents, and thus not having an identity document that matches one’s gender identity and gender expression.

In its Assessment of Legal and Regulatory Framework for HIV, AIDS and Tuberculosis, the Health Ministry noted that “transgender persons in Botswana are unable to access identity documents that reflect their gender identity, which is a barrier to health services, including in the context of HIV. In one documented case, a transwoman’s identity card did not reflect her gender identity- her identity card photo indicated she was ‘male’. When she presented her identity card at a health facility, a health worker called the police who took her into custody.”

The necessity of a correct national identity document goes beyond healthcare. The High Court of Botswana explains that “the national identity document plays a pivotal role in every Motswana’s daily life, as it links him or her with any service they require from various institutions. Most activities in the country require every Motswana to produce their identity document, for identification purposes of receiving services.”

According to the Legal Gender Recognition in Botswana report, this effectively means that transgender, whose gender identity and expression is likely to be different from the sex assigned to them at birth and from what is recorded on their identity document, cannot access services without risk of denial or discrimination, or accusations of fraud.

In this context, gays and lesbians advocacy group LEGABIBO has called on government through the Department of Civil and National Registration to urgently implement the High Court rulings on gender marker changes. As stated by the High Court in the ND vs Attorney General of Botswana judgement, identity cards (Omang) play an important role in the life of every Motswana. Refusal and or delay to issue a Motswana with an Omang is denying them to live a complete and full-filing life with dignity and violates their privacy and freedom of expression.

The judgement clarified that persons can change their gender marker as per the National Registrations Act, so changing the gender marker is legally possible. There is no need for a court order. It further said the person’s gender is self-identified, there is no need to consult medical doctors.

LEGABIBO also called on government to develop regulations that specify administrative procedure to change one’s gender marker, and observing self-determination process. Further, the group looks out for government to ensure members of the transgender community are engaged in the development of regulations.

“We call on this Department of Civil and National Registration to ensure that the gender marker change under the National Registration Act is aligned to the Births and Deaths Registry Act to avoid court order.

Meanwhile, a gay man in Lobatse, Moabi Mokenke was recently viciously killed after being sexually violated in the streets of Peleng, shockingly by his neighbourhood folks. The youthful lad, likely to be 29-years old, met his fate on his way home, from the wearisome Di a Bowa taverns situated in the much populated township of Peleng Central.

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Khato Civils fights back, dares detractors

23rd November 2020
Khato-civil

CEO of Khato Civils Mongezi Mnyani has come out of the silence and is going all way guns blazing against the company’s adversaries who he said are hell-bent on tarnishing his company’s image and “hard-earned good name”

Speaking to WeekendPost from South Africa, Mnyani said it is now time for him to speak out or act against his detractors. Khato Civils has done several projects across Africa. Khato Civils, a construction company and its affiliate engineering company, South Zambezi have executed a number of world class projects in South Africa, Malawi and now recently here in Botswana.

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UDC petitioners turn to Saleshando

23rd November 2020
Dumelang Saleshando

About ten (10) Umbrella for Democratic Change (UDC) parliamentary candidates who lost the 2019 general election and petitioned results this week met with UDC Vice President, Dumelang Saleshando to discuss the way forward concerning the quandary that is the legal fees put before them by Botswana Democratic Party (BDP) lawyers.

For a while now, UDC petitioners who are facing the wrath of quizzical sheriffs have demanded audience with UDC National Executive Committee (NEC) but in vain. However after the long wait for a tete-a-tete with the UDC, the petitioners met with Saleshando accompanied by other NEC members including Dr. Kesitegile Gobotswang, Reverend Mpho Dibeela and Dennis Alexander.

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