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Kgabo Report, Presidential pardon haunt Kweneng

 

Minister of Lands and Housing Prince Maele

The aftermath of Kgabo Commission and presidential pardon are still yet to tumble out before a taskforce committee that is yet to be fully operational.

The taskforce is expected to come up with some permanent solution to the land matters in Gabane-Mmankgodi that could eventually become a model for curbing the ongoing land scramble across the country.

According to the presidential pardon of 2008, Lt. Gen. Ian Khama then directed that the residents of the disputed areas, including Tsolamosese and Mogoditshane, pay the Landboards not more than P10 000 and undertake substantive ownership of the land equipped with land title certificates and this, to many, did not effect.

In addition Kgabo commission report liberated many of the residents, especially at Nkoyaphiri and Tsolamosese for any misdemeanor but the landboards set aside the recommendations and unleashed the ‘yellow monster’ to raze their homesteads and shacks.

WeekendPost can reveal that next week Minister of Lands and Housing Prince Maele is scheduled to meet a selected four-person team from Gabane- Mmankgodi constituency. It is anticipated the minister will probably use this opportunity to announce his full task force from the Ministry as he takes head-on, the land crisis currently besieging the entire nation and threatening its harmony.

The taskforce is the culmination of numerous Kgotla meetings between Minister Maele, area legislator Pius Mokgware, Molepolole Landboard and Mogoditshane Sub-landboard officials and residents that resolved that a special committee be set up to investigate the land matters in the area and recommend appropriate remedial measures.

A highly placed source in the constituency confirmed to this publication, saying:
 “Yes, it’s true we will be meeting Minister Maele next week on the land crisis in our area. We hope he will then tell us exactly when the taskforce will start its work.”

However, the source insisted that he would not say much because the issue was still an internal matter.

Once operational, the taskforce will look into, among others, the Kgabo Commission and the Presidential Pardon as declared on illegal squatters.

The newly crafted ‘internal terms’ of reference for the committee, however, state that in relation to the Presidential Pardon and Kgabo Commission, it shall establish those who have fully paid the penalties but are yet to have their plots regularized and the cause of the delay.

It shall also establish “the numbers of those who have not fully paid the penalties but are willing to pay and what initiatives are in place by the land board to help them.”

According to the confidential terms of reference, the taskforce will also investigate all plots allocated by Bogosi and establish if all such plot owners have been issued with certificates.
 

“If findings indicate that some of those allocations are still without certificates, the committee shall identify why the land board is delaying such allocations.”

In addition, the taskforce shall establish how many people have long applied to regularize their plots and land they obtained through inheritance, and why the landboard is delaying action on their application.

Furthermore, the probe team will also establish why the land board acquired land without consulting and compensating farmers in some cases, for example, in Nkoyaphiri Industrial and Ledumadumane.

The new-fangled commission will also find out the number of people who had made agreements with the landboard to allocate their children plots when their ploughing fields were acquired.

Investigators will specifically want to know as “to why in some cases the landboard failed to honour the agreement of allocating such children or some of them, and also, and why some children were denied allocation of plots on their obtained parents fields only because they got married or were married to land right holders”.

Moreover, the taskforce shall determine why the landboard is inconsistent in its land compensation as some farmers are compensated with plots why others the land board insists on monetary compensation.

“We will also establish why in some cases the land board refused to regularize mekgoro (homesteads) of those whose farms were acquired; establish what the land board intends to do with cases where a farmer was compensated and refused to regularize homestead for the acquired ploughing field,” they assert in the official document.

All in all it is anticipated that the taskforce will help bring the contentious land issue, which has been raging for over a long period of time, to a mutually acceptable conclusion.

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Free at last: Ian Kirby Speaks Out

6th December 2021
Justice Ian Kirby

The outgoing President of the Court of Appeal, Justice Ian Kirby, shares his thoughts with us as he leaves the Bench at the end of this year.

WeekendPost: Why did you move between the Attorney General and the Bench?

Ian Kirby: I was a member of the Attorney General’s Chambers three times- first in 1969 as Assistant State Counsel, then in 1990 as Deputy Attorney General (Civil), and finally in 2004 as Attorney General. I was invited in 2000 by the late Chief Justice Julian Nganunu to join the Bench. I was persuaded by former President Festus Mogae to be his Attorney General in 2004 as, he said, it was my duty to do so to serve the nation. I returned to the Judiciary as soon as I could – in May 2006, when there was a vacancy on the High Court Bench.

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Civil society could rescue Botswana’s flawed democracy’ 

6th December 2021
Parliament

Botswana’s civil society is one of the non-state actors that could save the country’s democracy from sliding into regression, a Germany based think tank has revealed.  This is according to a discussion paper by researchers at the German Development Institute who analysed the effects of e-government usage on political attitudes In Botswana.

In the paper titled “E-government and democracy in Botswana: Observational and experimental evidence on the effects of e-government usage on political attitudes,” the researchers offer a strongly worded commentary on Botswana’s ‘flawed democracy.’  The authors noted that with Botswana’s Parliament structurally – and in practice – feeble, the potential for checks and balances on executive power rests with the judiciary.

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Bangwato at loggerheads over Moshupa trip

6th December 2021

Bangwato in Serowe — where Bamagwato Paramount Chief and former President Lt. Gen Ian Khama originates – disagree on whether they must send a delegation to dialogue with President Mokgweetsi Masisi’s family in Moshupa. Just last week, a meeting was called by the Regent of Bamagwato, Kgosi Sediegeng Kgamane, at Serowe Kgotla to, among others, update the tribe on the whereabouts of their Kgosi (Khama). 

Further, his state of health was also discussed, with Kgamane telling the attendees that all is well with Khama. The main reason for the meeting was to deliberate on the escalating tension between Khama and Masisi — a three-year bloodletting going unabated.

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