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Doha talks collapse: the implications

Collapse of talks in Doha, Qatar by world’s biggest oil producers last Sunday sent oil prices tumbling to around $40 per barrel. The talks were initiated to nail a deal to freeze oil output to prop up prices in a market that has seen uncertainties over the past few months. So desperate was the situation that in an unusual fashion, OPEC members and non-members met for the deal.

Iran, which sanctions were lifted in January as part of the nuclear deal it signed with world powers, stayed away from the meeting. It insisted that it would not accept proposals to cap its production until it recovered a similar market share to that which it held before the sanctions were imposed. However, according to diplomats and officials at the talks, Saudi Arabia insisted on Iran signing up to any agreement.

Prices jumped back marginally to around $45 per barrel on Thursday as the market focused on supply outages: an oil-worker strike in Kuwait which removed 1.3 million barrels a day from the market, pipeline problems in Nigeria removed another 440,000 barrels, 150,000 barrels a day of Iraqi crude has come off the market because of a pipeline dispute between the central government and Kurdish regional authorities, and the North Sea production maintenance is expected to remove another 160,000 barrels.

The $45 per barrel price marks a significant drop from the $110 per barrel price seen in mid-2014. Analysts have attributed the dramatic fall in prices to a deliberate move by Saudi Arabia for an oil price crush in response to threats posed by new forms of renewable energy — windmills, tidal power, and solar power. The Saudis also wanted to keep in check fracking in the United States which threatened to displace their production.

One analyst, Philip Verleger, an economist and consultant who has watched the oil market for more than 40 years, has argued; “Saudis now want cheaper oil, in part to slow down the fracking revolution in the U.S. — and to signal to the developing world: Don't worry — you don't need to invest in alternative energy. You can buy cheap oil from us.”

Botswana, as a price taker, has benefitted from low global oil prices leading to a reduction in fuel pump prices in December 2014 and a bulging National Petroleum Fund (NPF).

With the oil output freeze intended to prop up prices not realized, will we enjoy an extended period of cheap fuel and is there is a possibility we will see another fuel pump price decrease. Batsumi Rankokwane, Principal Energy Officer in the Ministry of Minerals, Energy and Water Resources responded that government reviews prices on a monthly basis and adjusts pump prices, if necessary,  in order to align with international trends.

Further, he mentioned other factors that are taken into consideration to adjust local retail prices such as the position of the National Petroleum Fund (NPF) balance and unit rates movement. “Any decision by the government to adjust fuel pump prices shall always be communicated as has been the norm in the past after satisfying all necessary procedures and processes,” he said.

On the question of the health of the NPF, Rankokwane assured that the NPF has enough funds to continue cushioning the effects of fluctuating oil prices. He also acknowledged that the fund balance has been increasing as a result of over recoveries recorded in the previous months.

AN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE

Yes negotiations for the Doha round of trade liberalisation have been suspended indefinitely. In the words of Brazilian foreign minister Celso Amorim, ‘The Doha round is as near to a catastrophe as one can imagine’.

Andrew Charlton is a research economist in CEP’s globalisation programme, and co-author with Nobel laureate Joseph Stiglitz of Fair Trade for All: How Trade can Promote Development (Oxford University Press,2006) is of the view that the Doha failure may undermine WTO credibility and ferment distrust in developing countries

He points out that this outcome was not a foregone conclusion. For the last six months, a deal had been close, at least in the sense that its parameters had been fairly well-defined and each party knew the likely compromises that would be required to reach an agreement.

“The United States knew that its compromise lay in offering more farm subsidy cuts; the European Union knew it would be required to cut agricultural tariffs; and the larger emerging countries knew they would have to offer deeper industrial and agricultural tariff cuts. Yet after more than five years of preparations, when the deal was there for the taking, none of the key players stepped up to make it happen.”

Charlton says at this stage, the critical question is whether the collapse of the Doha round is a catastrophe for the world. As it stands, the answer is no. he writes that the World Bank’s estimates of likely gains from a successful Doha round are $100 billion, most of which would accrue to the rich countries. Much of the remainder (the Bank is at pains to say) would probably be eroded by concessions on ‘special products’ and other loopholes.

Further, Charlton says had the negotiators been more ambitious, perhaps there would be larger potential gains from a successful agreement. But with the minimalist agenda that evolved, it is hard to identify any serious grouping of countries for which a successful deal is of critical significance.

He view is that the Cairns group of agricultural exporters – a diverse coalition that includes Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Indonesia, New Zealand and South Africa – is a possible exception.

“But in the longer run, the collapse of the Doha round may be more significant. There is a long-term economic cost that is difficult to quantify, and there is an obvious symbolic failure. This may undermine the credibility of the World Trade Organisation and ferment distrust in the developing countries whose promised ‘development round’ has conspicuously failed to materialise.”

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China’s GDP expands 3% in 2022 despite various pressures

2nd February 2023
China’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) expanded by 3% year-on-year to 121.02 trillion yuan ($17.93 trillion) in 2022 despite being mired in various growth pressures, according to data from the National Bureau Statistics.

The annual growth rate beat a median economist forecast of 2.8% as polled by Reuters. The country’s fourth-quarter GDP growth of 2.9% also surpassed expectations for a 1.8% increase.

In 2022, the Chinese economy encountered more difficulties and challenges than was expected amid a complex domestic and international situation. However, NBS said economic growth stabilized after various measures were taken to shore up growth.

Industrial output rose 3.6% in 2022 over the previous year, while retail sales slightly shrank by 0.2% data show that fixed-asset investment increased 5.1% over 2021, with a 9.1% hike in manufacturing investment but a 10% fall in property investment.

China created 12.06 million new jobs in urban regions throughout the year, surpassing its annual target of 11 million, and officials have stressed the importance of continuing an employment-first policy in 2023.

Meanwhile, China tourism market is a step closer to robust recovery. Tourism operators are in high spirits because the market saw a good chance of a robust recovery during the Spring Festival holiday amid relaxed COVID-19 travel policies.

On January 27, the last day of the seven-day break, the Ministry of Culture and Tourism published an encouraging performance report of the tourism market. It said that domestic destinations and attractions received 308 million visits, up 23.1% year-on-year. The number is roughly 88.6% of that in 2019, they year before the pandemic hit.

According to the report, tourism-related revenue generated during the seven-day period was about 375.8 billion yuan ($55.41 billion), a year-on-year rise of 30%. The revenue was about 73% of that in 2019, the Ministry said.

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Jewellery manufacturing plant to create over 100 jobs

30th January 2023

The state of the art jewellery manufacturing plant that has been set up by international diamond and cutting company, KGK Diamonds Botswana will create over 100 jobs, of which 89 percent will be localized.

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Investors inject capital into Tsodilo Resources Company

25th January 2023

Local diamond and metal exploration company Tsodilo Resources Limited has negotiated a non-brokered private placement of 2,200, 914 units of the company at a price per unit of 0.20 US Dollars, which will provide gross proceeds to the company in the amount of C$440, 188. 20.

According to a statement from the group, proceeds from the private placement will be used for the betterment of the Xaudum iron formation project in Botswana and general corporate purposes.

The statement says every unit of the company will consist of a common share in the capital of the company and one Common Share purchase warrant of the company.

Each warrant will enable a holder to make a single purchase for the period of 24 months at an amount of $0.20. As per regularity requirements, the group indicates that the common shares and warrants will be subject to a four month plus a day hold period from date of closure.

Tsodilo is exempt from the formal valuation and minority shareholder approval requirements. This is for the reason that the fair market value of the private placement, insofar as it involves the director, is not more than 25% of the company’s market capitalization.

Tsodilo Resources Limited is an international diamond and metals exploration company engaged in the search for economic diamond and metal deposits at its Bosoto Limited and Gcwihaba Resources projects in Botswana.  The company has a 100% stake in Bosoto which holds the BK16 kimberlite project in the Orapa Kimberlite Field (OKF) in Botswana.

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