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BDP challengers worry Masisi

Main Threat; Minister of Infrastructure, Science and Technology Nonofo Molefhi

Botswana Democratic Party (BDP) Chairman and Vice president Mokgweetsi Masisi this week expressed reservations about a myriad of party chums who have thrown their hats in the ring to challenge him for the presidency towards 2019, Weekend Post has learnt.

Masisi was speaking to Southern region party faithfuls at a secret in-house meeting at Sampi Lodge in Kanye on Sunday.

By virtue of his position, Masisi is expected to automatically rise to the position of President in 2018 when incumbent President Dr. Seretse Khama Ian Khama’s two terms – as dictated by the country’s constitution – come to a close. It has been the party norm and tradition that when the VP ascends to the presidency, he is also endorsed substantive at the next congress leading to the elections.

At the said meeting it is understood that Masisi, who was accompanied by party Secretary General Botsalo Ntuane and Member of Central Committee (MCC) for Southern region and Mahalapye East law maker Botlogile Tshireletso; once again took shots at those with intent of making the presidency out of his reach.

An immaculate BDP source in the region told WeekendPost after the meeting that the party Chairman spoke out against the “countless” contestants who want to challenge him and expressed his disappointment at the gesture.

“He told us that some want to split the party by contesting in numbers for the presidency saying it appeared like it was mostly the old BDP crop. He therefore – indicated that this may suggest that we are an opposition in our own,” the source who preferred anonymity for fear of being victimized pointed out.  

A sizable number of influential BDP figures like President Dr. Seretse Khama Ian Khama’s younger brother and Minister of Environment, Wildlife and Tourism Tshekedi Khama; Minister of Infrastructure, Science and Technology Nonofo Molefhi; ex-cabinet Minister and Botswana ambassador to United States Tebelelo Seretse as well as corruption busting ex law maker Robert Masitara have all confirmed to this publication before, of their “interest” in the BDP presidential race.

In addition former cabinet Minister Boyce Sebetela has also hinted of a possible run for the party’s top office while Botswana’s ambassador to Japan Jacob Nkate is also fingered in the race, and the list may balloon if a compromise which was previously the subject of discussion is not reached.

Mindful of the weight the presidential contesters carry, the BDP insider said the Vice President was concerned that there are some people who influence others to stand for impending party presidential elections with the aim of ‘de-stabilising’ the BDP. “He believed that the presidency should be left to him for purposes of stability of the party.”

It is understood that Masisi also conceded that they need not do anything that may cause instability in the party as they may be on the verge of losing elections to opposition parties – which are likely to form a united front in 2019 – and therefore given that they have to tread carefully.

In the meeting, it is also understood that they also drew a plan and formula to try to win the next elections again, which are likely to be tightly contested.
Masisi also split Kweneng, Southern region   

In his bid to the state house post 2019 General Elections, the Vice president announced at the Kanye meeting that they have decided to split the Southern region into two separate regions.

Southern region will now be made up of only Lobatse, Goodhope/Mabule, and Mmathethe/Molapowabojang constituencies while the other new region will benamed South West which comprises Kanye North, Kanye South, Moshupa/Manyana and Jwaneng/Mabutsane.

The move to increase regions – particularly in the South is seen as Masisi’s strategy to lure votes from the south of the country and take regions by the scruff of the neck – to enable him to be president. Regional Chairpersons and Secretaries have the leverage to nominate and endorse their preferred candidates for presidency when the party gathers at a special congress.

According to the source inside the BDP, “the issue is about numbers, as you know the regions’ Chairpersons and Secretaries elect the president and Masisi wanted to make sure that there are more regions in the South and that the regional leaders are on his side. It’s his strategy to win elections by increasing the regions. He is strong in the South so he wants to increase his base first,” he stressed.

Prior to paying a visit to the Southern region, it is understood that Masisi was at Kweneng region a fortnight ago where he also hinted that the region needs to be divided to increase regions’ effectiveness as they were seen as wide and huge.

There has been 12 regions for the party namely North West, North East, Western, Francistown, Central, Letswapo, Bomase, Shoma, South East, Gaborone, Southern and Kweneng. The new region is South West and others are expected to be announced soon and therefore will increase from the initial 12.

It is understood that for his part the BDP Secretary General Botsalo Ntuane highlighted to ma-domkrag who were present that the party is considering increasing the number of constituencies especially in the North where BDP’s presence is very strong.

Another high profile member at the meeting, Tshireletso is also said to have raised concern about Specially Elected Councilors and Legislators who have to vigorously sell the party, which she says is currently not the case. She also said as the MCC, nobody never approached her with the evaluation of recent bye elections in the Southern region which she says concerns her.

BDP SG Ntuane confirms the meeting

When reached for comment, Ntuane, in a carefully worded response confirmed to this publication that indeed they met over the weekend in Kanye although he was cagey with the details of such a meeting while emphasizing that- it was ‘in house’.

Ntuane declined to comment on the words allegedly uttered by BDP chairman when he aired his uneasiness on the high number of BDP members eyeing the presidency instead of smoothly endorsing him as has been the party tradition.

He however stated that: “there are certain processes which we follow internally, which in the case of Southern region culminated in the meeting held over the weekend. With Kweneng region the internal process is still ongoing and we will make an announcement only when it’s completed.”

He emphasized that the gathering in Southern region was an in-house meeting and in such instances they don’t disseminate anything publicly unless it’s on a need to know basis. “Note that we have been holding many such meetings across the country as the party leadership,” he told this publication.

According to the ever diplomatic Ntuane, the only thing they can share from this particular in-house meeting which is of critical importance to democrats in “Southern region is that their region will be realigned into 2 new regions comprising of a Southern region which will be made up of Lobatse, Goodhope/Mabule, and Mmathethe/Molapowabojang constituencies.”

The other new region he said is South West which comprises Kanye North, Kanye South, Moshupa and Jwaneng/Mabutsane. “So the 7 constituencies which previously made up the Southern region have now been split into 3 and 4 constituencies respectively. We hope the realignment will improve administrative efficiencies and assist in mobilization efforts as we prepare for 2019.”

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BODANSA strikes gold with a handsome P45K windfall from Turnstar Holdings

27th February 2024

The Botswana DanceSport Association (BODANSA) has been graced with a financial boon of P45,000 courtesy of Turnstar Holdings. This generous endowment is earmarked for the illustrious Botswana International Dance Sport Grand Prix Championships, which are scheduled to animate Gaborone from Friday to Saturday.

At a media engagement held early today, BODANSA’s Marketing Maestro, Tiro Ntwayagae, shared that Turnstar Holdings Limited has bestowed a gift of P45,000 towards the grand spectacle.

“We are thrilled to announce that this backing will enable us to orchestrate a cultural soirée at the Game City Marque locale, a night brimming with cultural fervor set for March 1, 2024, from 6pm to the stroke of midnight.

This enchanting space will also serve as the battleground for the preliminaries of traditional dance ensembles—spanning the rhythmically rich Setapa to the euphoric beats of Sebirwa, the spirited Seperu, the heavenly Hosana, and more—in a competition folded into the Traditional Dance Groups Category. The ensemble that dances into the judges’ hearts will clinch a grand prize of P10,000,” elaborated Ntwayagae.

He further illuminated that the cultural eve would not only celebrate traditional melodies but also the fresh beats of contemporary dance variants including Hip Hop, Sbujwa, Amapiano, among others, in a dazzling display of modern dance mastery.

Moreover, these championships carry the prestigious recognition by the World DanceSport Federation as a qualifying round for the Breakdance category for the Paris 2024 Olympics. “This is a monumental opportunity for athletes to leap towards their Olympic dreams during one of the penultimate qualifiers,” underscored Ntwayagae.

Looking ahead to March 2, 2024, the festivities will propel into the University of Botswana Indoor Sports Arena for the championship’s climactic showdowns encompassing Breakdance, Latin, and Ballroom Dancing.

 

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Government of Botswana yet to sign, ratify the UN-CRPD

26th February 2024

In Botswana, a beacon of democracy in Africa, the right to participate in the political discourse is a cornerstone of its societal structure. It’s an avenue through which citizens shape the rules and systems that govern their everyday lives. Despite this, recent studies indicate that Individuals with Disabilities (IWDs) are notably absent from political dialogues and face substantial hurdles in exercising their democratic freedoms.

Research within the nation has uncovered that IWDs encounter difficulties in engaging fully with the political process, with a pronounced gap in activities beyond mere voting. The call for environments that are both accessible and welcoming to IWDs is loud, with one participant, who has a physical disability, spotlighting the absence of ramps at voting venues and the dire need for enhanced support to facilitate equitable involvement in the electoral process.

The challenges highlighted by the study participants pinpoint the structural and social obstacles that deter IWDs from participating wholly in democracy. The inaccessibility of voting facilities and the lack of special accommodations for people with disabilities are critical barriers. Those with more significant or intellectual disabilities face even steeper challenges, often feeling marginalized and detached from political engagement.

To surmount these obstacles, there is an urgent appeal for Botswana to stride towards more inclusive and accessible political stages for IWDs. This necessitates a committed effort from both the government and relevant entities to enforce laws and policies that protect the rights of IWDs to partake in the political framework. Enhancing awareness and understanding of the political landscape among IWDs, alongside integrating inclusive practices within political entities and governmental bodies, is crucial.

By dismantling these barriers and nurturing an inclusive political environment, Botswana can live up to its democratic ideals, ensuring every citizen, regardless of ability, can have a substantive stake in the country’s political future.

 

 

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People with Disabilities Face Barriers to Political Participation in Botswana

23rd February 2024

Individuals challenged by disabilities encounter formidable obstacles when endeavoring to partake in political processes within the context of Botswana. Political involvement, a cornerstone of democratic governance, empowers citizens to shape the legislative landscape that impacts their daily existence. Despite Botswana’s reputation for upholding democratic ideals, recent insights unveil a troubling reality – those with disabilities find themselves marginalized in the realm of politics, contending with substantial barriers obstructing the exercise of their democratic liberties.

A recent inquiry in Botswana unveiled a panorama where individuals with disabilities confront hurdles in navigating the political arena, their involvement often restricted to the basic act of voting. Voices emerged from the study, underscoring the critical necessity of fostering environments that are accessible and welcoming, affording individuals with disabilities the active engagement they rightfully deserve in political processes. Noteworthy was the account of a participant grappling with physical impairments, shedding light on the glaring absence of ramps at polling stations and the urgent call for enhanced support mechanisms to ensure an equitable electoral participation.

The echoes reverberating from these narratives serve as poignant reminders of the entrenched obstacles impeding the full integration of individuals with disabilities into the democratic tapestry. The inaccessibility of polling stations and the glaring absence of provisions tailored to the needs of persons with disabilities loom large as formidable barricades to their political engagement. Particularly pronounced is the plight of those grappling with severe impairments and intellectual challenges, who face even steeper hurdles in seizing political participation opportunities, often grappling with feelings of isolation and exclusion from the political discourse.

Calls for decisive action cascade forth, urging the establishment of more inclusive and accessible political ecosystems that embrace individuals with disabilities in Botswana. Government bodies and concerned stakeholders are urged to prioritize the enactment of laws and policies designed to safeguard the political rights of individuals with disabilities. Furthermore, initiatives geared towards enhancing awareness and education on political processes and rights for this segment of society must be spearheaded, alongside the adoption of inclusive measures within political institutions and party structures.

By dismantling these barriers and nurturing a political landscape that is truly inclusive, Botswana can earnestly uphold its democratic ethos and afford every citizen, including those with disabilities, a substantive opportunity to partake in the political fabric of the nation.

 

 

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