Connect with us
Advertisement

Mokaila, Tshekedi’s Big money swap

Following his arrival at the Ministry of Transport and Communications, Minister Kitso Mokaila could find himself handing over Air Botswana to Tshekedi Khama’s Ministry of Environment, Wildlife and Tourism, if what was recently relayed at the parastatal’s board persists.

Mokaila was shuffled from the former Ministry of Energy and Water Resources. The reason advanced for moving Air Botswana to Tshekedi’s ministry is that most of the Air Botswana customers, roughly about 70 percent of them are tourists. This publication has been informed that the Air Botswana board chaired by former Botswana Defence Force (BDF) Commander, retired Major General Tebogo Masire was recently briefed on the possible developments following the re-organisation of Ministries.

The decision is also accompanied by a development that will see a P2.6 billion tender to acquire four jets and turboprops being cancelled and re-started at the new parent Ministry.  The tender process was almost at the final stages of due process. Three companies, Bombadier of Canada; ATR of France; and Embraer of Brazil had entered the race to scoop the lucrative deal. The Acting General Manager of Air Botswana, Agnes Khunwane had mentioned in passing at the Samson Guma Moyo chaired Parliamentary Committee on Statutory Bodies that they intend to acquire new Aircrafts in the near future.

Over a pro-longed period of time, Air Botswana has been using ATRs. The Air Botswana engineers and pilots are trained and upskilled in ATRs. The stock and tools are customised to ATRs. Weekend Post gathers that even this time around, ATR had put a convincing bid and was on the verge of outdoing Bombardier and Embraer. In fact this is the tender that forced former Minister of Transport and Communications, Tshenolo Mabeo into the controversial trips to Brazil, Canada and France to do some form of window shopping for aircrafts. The trip has since invited the wrath of the Parliamentary Committee because Mabeo and his then permanent secretary were found to be not fit to decide on the mode of aircraft to be procured by Air Botswana.

ATR’s PROPOSAL WAS APPEALING 

In its proposal, ATR of France was to also buy back Air Botswana aging fleet at market price. Indications from Air Botswana sources are that the whole fleet has reached end of useful life.  The Board is said to have been impressed with this offer. In addition ATR had pledged to further train Air Botswana engineers and pilots for free on the new Aircrafts in the event that they get the job. The Board had also considered the fact that its staff and the tools for maintenance were compliant with ATRs models. ATR was most likely to get the job to supply the three turboprops.

BOMBADIER WANTS “ALL OR NOTHING”

For its part, Bombardier, which sliced in half the 2016 delivery forecast for its C Series aircraft this week, and said it expected full-year revenue to be at the lower end of its previously announced range, had made it clear that it wanted to do the job as a whole, “all or nothing”. They wanted to supply both the jets and the turboprops. The Board had considered Bombardier for the jets, but following their “all or nothing” demand, they were dropped on the basis that their proposal was inferior to that of ATR when it comes to turboprops. Bombardier, which has agents in Botswana, has in the past supplied the Presidential jet to Botswana. The Department of Wildlife and National Parks operate the KODIAK, also from Bombardier for various logistical missions and departmental duties as well as for anti-poaching and law enforcement.

The setback is the latest for the CSeries program, which took years to get off the ground and has been hit by production delays and cost overruns, causing the Montreal-based plane and train maker to agree to a C$1 billion ($774 million) investment from the Quebec government. The company remains in talks with the Canadian government about further funding.

Bombardier Inc. cautioned that private-aircraft prices will remain under pressure as it posted a wider-than-expected loss, adding to Chief Executive Officer Alain Bellemare’s burdens as he tries to turn around Canada’s largest aerospace company. Reports from Canada indicate that shrinking demand for corporate planes–typically Bombardier’s most profitable business–is weighing on Bellemare as he works to increase profit and cash flow.

The planemaker cut production of its Global 5000 and 6000 business jets last year, and delayed entry into service of another model by two years as sales of large private planes dropped.

EMBRAER WAS CONSIDERED FOR JETS

The Brazilian company is currently doing well in the market and was most likely to be considered for the supply of jets, which is dominantly their stock in trade.

World demand for jet aircraft in the segment of 70-130 seats from 2016 to 2035 will total 6,400 units, according to the forecasts of Brazilian aeronautical company Embraer disclosed at the Farnborough Air Festival in the United Kingdom.

Embraer projects demand for aircraft with between 70 and 90 seats to total 2,300 units while for aircraft with 90 to 130 seats demand is expected to reach 4,100 units, with the overall demand in the period valued at around US$300 billion.

The Brazilian company also said that the world’s fleet of jet aircraft in the segment of 70-130 seats will increase from 2,670 in operation in 2015 to 6,690 in 2035, with the fastest growth of all commercial aviation segments.

AIR BOTSWANA AG GM WITHDRAWS FROM SHORTLIST

As the search for a permanent General Manager at Air Botswana continues, the Board could find itself in a position where they present just one name for consideration to Cabinet. This publication has learnt that Agnes Khunwane withdrew her name from the shortlist of candidates earmarked for the position.

It is understood that she is not happy because she was initially the only candidate left in the shortlist after another set of five fell off on technicalities and lack of business background, but the Board chairman, Masire was unsettled by the prospect of submitting just one name to cabinet for consideration.

The chairman then embarked on a head hunting exercise which led him to former MVA Chief Executive Officer, Cross Kgosidiile. When Khunwane heard of this development she wrote a letter withdrawing her name, pushing the Board back to square one. It is not clear if she will be coerced to rescind her withdrawal or Kgosidiile, a former Air Botswana Finance Manager will be unchallenged before cabinet. The twist into the whole matter is that Kgosidiile left MVA without an explanation for his departure. 

Continue Reading

News

Transgender persons in Botswana live a miserable life

23rd November 2020
Transgender persons

An international report complied in South Africa dubbed ‘Legal Gender Recognition in Botswana’ says that the transgender and gender non-conforming people in Botswana live a miserable life. The community experiences higher levels of discrimination, violence and ill health.

In this report, it has been indicated that this is because their gender identity, which does not conform to narrowly define societal norms, renders them more vulnerable. Gender identity is a social determinant of health, which means that it is a factor that influences people’s health via their social context, their communities and their experiences of social exclusion. The Ministry of Health and Wellness has recognized this, and transgender people are considered a vulnerable population under the Botswana Second National Strategic Framework for HIV and AIDS 2010-2017.

In a recent study that shed light on the lived experiences of transgender and gender non-conforming people in Botswana, transgender persons often experience discrimination because of their gender identity and expression. The study was conducted by the University of Cape Town, LEGABIBO, BONELA, as well as Rainbow Identity Association and approved by the Health Ministry as well as the University of Botswana.

Of the 77 transgender and gender non-conforming people who participated in the study, less than half were employed. Two thirds, which is approximately 67% said that they did not have sufficient funds to cover their everyday needs. Two in five had hidden health concerns from their healthcare provider because they were afraid to disclose their gender identity.

More than half said that because of their gender identity, they had been treated disrespectfully at a healthcare facility (55%), almost half (46%) said they had been insulted at a healthcare facility, and one quarter (25%) had been denied healthcare because of their gender identity.

At the same time, the ‘Are we doing right’ study suggests that transgender and non-conforming people might be at higher risks of experiencing violence and mental ill-health, compared to the general population. More than half had experienced verbal embarrassment because of their gender identity, 48% had experienced physical violence and more than one third (38%) had experienced sexual violence.

The study showed that mental health concerns were high among transgender and gender non-conforming people in Botswana. Half of the transgender and gender non-conforming study participants (53%) showed signs of depression. Between one in four and one in six showed signs of moderate or severe anxiety (22% among transgender women, 24% among transgender men and 17% among gender non-conforming people).

Further, the study revealed that many had attempted suicide: one in three transgender women (32%), more than one in three transgender men (35%) and three in five gender non-conforming people (61%).

International research, as well as research from Botswana, suggests that not being able to change one’s gender marker has a negative impact on access to healthcare and mental health and wellbeing. The study further showed that one in four transgender people in Botswana (25%) had been denied access to healthcare. This is, at least in part, linked to not being able to change one’s gender marker in the identity documents, and thus not having an identity document that matches one’s gender identity and gender expression.

In its Assessment of Legal and Regulatory Framework for HIV, AIDS and Tuberculosis, the Health Ministry noted that “transgender persons in Botswana are unable to access identity documents that reflect their gender identity, which is a barrier to health services, including in the context of HIV. In one documented case, a transwoman’s identity card did not reflect her gender identity- her identity card photo indicated she was ‘male’. When she presented her identity card at a health facility, a health worker called the police who took her into custody.”

The necessity of a correct national identity document goes beyond healthcare. The High Court of Botswana explains that “the national identity document plays a pivotal role in every Motswana’s daily life, as it links him or her with any service they require from various institutions. Most activities in the country require every Motswana to produce their identity document, for identification purposes of receiving services.”

According to the Legal Gender Recognition in Botswana report, this effectively means that transgender, whose gender identity and expression is likely to be different from the sex assigned to them at birth and from what is recorded on their identity document, cannot access services without risk of denial or discrimination, or accusations of fraud.

In this context, gays and lesbians advocacy group LEGABIBO has called on government through the Department of Civil and National Registration to urgently implement the High Court rulings on gender marker changes. As stated by the High Court in the ND vs Attorney General of Botswana judgement, identity cards (Omang) play an important role in the life of every Motswana. Refusal and or delay to issue a Motswana with an Omang is denying them to live a complete and full-filing life with dignity and violates their privacy and freedom of expression.

The judgement clarified that persons can change their gender marker as per the National Registrations Act, so changing the gender marker is legally possible. There is no need for a court order. It further said the person’s gender is self-identified, there is no need to consult medical doctors.

LEGABIBO also called on government to develop regulations that specify administrative procedure to change one’s gender marker, and observing self-determination process. Further, the group looks out for government to ensure members of the transgender community are engaged in the development of regulations.

“We call on this Department of Civil and National Registration to ensure that the gender marker change under the National Registration Act is aligned to the Births and Deaths Registry Act to avoid court order.

Meanwhile, a gay man in Lobatse, Moabi Mokenke was recently viciously killed after being sexually violated in the streets of Peleng, shockingly by his neighbourhood folks. The youthful lad, likely to be 29-years old, met his fate on his way home, from the wearisome Di a Bowa taverns situated in the much populated township of Peleng Central.

Continue Reading

News

Khato Civils fights back, dares detractors

23rd November 2020
Khato-civil

CEO of Khato Civils Mongezi Mnyani has come out of the silence and is going all way guns blazing against the company’s adversaries who he said are hell-bent on tarnishing his company’s image and “hard-earned good name”

Speaking to WeekendPost from South Africa, Mnyani said it is now time for him to speak out or act against his detractors. Khato Civils has done several projects across Africa. Khato Civils, a construction company and its affiliate engineering company, South Zambezi have executed a number of world class projects in South Africa, Malawi and now recently here in Botswana.

This content is locked

Login To Unlock The Content!

Continue Reading

News

UDC petitioners turn to Saleshando

23rd November 2020
Dumelang Saleshando

About ten (10) Umbrella for Democratic Change (UDC) parliamentary candidates who lost the 2019 general election and petitioned results this week met with UDC Vice President, Dumelang Saleshando to discuss the way forward concerning the quandary that is the legal fees put before them by Botswana Democratic Party (BDP) lawyers.

For a while now, UDC petitioners who are facing the wrath of quizzical sheriffs have demanded audience with UDC National Executive Committee (NEC) but in vain. However after the long wait for a tete-a-tete with the UDC, the petitioners met with Saleshando accompanied by other NEC members including Dr. Kesitegile Gobotswang, Reverend Mpho Dibeela and Dennis Alexander.

This content is locked

Login To Unlock The Content!

Continue Reading
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!