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Masisi to defend his BDP chairmanship

Vice President Mokgweetsi Masisi is expected to defend his chairmanship of the ruling Botswana Democratic Party (BDP) next year. The 2017 National Congress is billed to make or break political careers of several ruling party stalwarts especially those who aspire for the presidency and or the vice presidency of the republic.

Following the Mmadinare congress last year, which ushered in Masisi as chairman the BDP will have a more gruelling elective congress next year that will see many political careers hang in the balance. Masisi is said to have made it clear to his inner circle that he will contest the chairmanship. The move is seen as the President in waiting’s intention to stamp authority and demonstrate his aura within the party structures. 

President Lt Gen Ian Khama is expected to step down at the end of March in 2018, it will be 18 months before the 2019 General Elections. By all accounts the focus will shift towards Vice President Mokgweetsi Masisi, who is expected to ascend to the highest office. While some within Masisi see the decision to stand as a risky dice, the Vice President does not want to second guess his popularity, and he is determined to put to bed those who doubt or undermined his political prowess and command within the party.

Several names have been suggested as potential challengers for Masisi as President Khama’s tenure nears expiry. Some have made abundantly clear that they have presidential ambitions and they intend to challenge. Former secretary general of the BDP, Jacob Nkate; and Minister of Environment, Wildlife and Tourism, Tshekedi Khama are loud and clear on their ambitions. Tebelelo Seretse unsuccessfully took on Masisi in Mmadinare last year; she may try her luck again. Minister Nonofo Molefhi has some party members pushing him to avail himself, and he has kept quiet.

But Masisi’s inner circle is convinced that next’s year congress is a worthy gamble, and by all accounts those who want to dictate party terms should be part of the group that will be elected next year. Losers at this congress may well kiss their political relevance goodbye. But for Vice President Masisi, losing the chairmanship could send the party and the country into confusion. There could possibly be questions as to how he will win a national election if fails at party level; some could ask why they should trust him and entrust him with national issues if his party does not trust him. However, this publication learns that Masisi is confident that he wants to bite the bullet because he is not a coward. Should Masisi lose the chairmanship to any challenger, he will be a limping president-in-waiting; he could easily be challenged and beaten should the BDP go for a presidential vote in April of the following year.

These events leading to this 2017 National Congress bear a resemblance with what transpired in 2003 at the Gantsi congress prior to the 2004 General Elections. This is the congress that is believed to have ‘robbed’ Ponatshego Kedikilwe of the opportunity to succeed Festus Mogae as the country’s fourth President.

Mogae’s Vice President at the time, Lt Gen Ian Khama won the party chairmanship race against Kedikilwe with a convincing margin. As things stand, if President Khama does not drop Masisi before he leaves office at the end of March 2018, Masisi automatically assumes office as the country President and Party President through the party’s automatic succession plan.

Article 29.3.3 states that ‘In the event of a vacancy arising in the Presidency of the party at a time when the party is in power, the Vice President of Botswana shall automatically become the State and Party President. But Masisi does not want a situation where he is president and had recently lost some party position to one of the party members, it will be damaging to his national standing.  His audacious recruitment drive in the opposition ranks is part of the strategy to cement his standing in the BDP.

Hell will break loose if Masisi loses the chairmanship of the party, it will automatically translate that the party no longer has trust on him. He will become a weak President in 2018 with no party support and his future will hang in the balance. He will risk making history becoming the first President to have ever run the shortest term (18 months). At this stage he can only be ‘rescued’ if the party believes in his leadership and administration as the President. However, the party has the option to substitute him with someone who would have won the chairmanship because that person will have the support of the party. In this setup, it is vital for the party to win elections than an individual.

SIGNIFICANCE OF 2017 CONGRESS

The 2017 National Congress significance is that the elected central committee will take the party to the 2019 General elections. Should Masisi win the chairmanship next year, it means that by the time he takes over from President Khama, he will still be chairman and the party will have the option to choose the next chairman from the 18 member central committee. Therefore this may mean that those aspiring for chairmanship should ensure by all means possible that they are part of the next central committee. Upon Masisi assuming the Presidency, the constitution states that ‘In the event of a central committee member, other than one of the six Office Bearers resigning, being incapacitated, dying or otherwise ceasing to be a member of the central committee, the President of the party shall appoint another person to fill the vacancy, pending the next National Congress. In this case Masisi will be eligible as the party president to appoint a chairman of his choice.   

THE 2003 FALLOUT 

The 2017 National Congress will resemble the events that unfolded at Gantsi in 2003. Former Mmadinare legislator and BDP stalwart who was later given the transitional Vice Presidency, Ponatshego Kedikilwe took over as the BDP chairman in 1995; he would have ascended the ladder to become the President in 1998. Conversely, things took a bitter turn, with the backing of President Mogae; Vice President Khama challenged Kedikilwe for the chairmanship of the party. The stakes were high: Had Kedikilwe won; there was a strong possibility that he would have challenged and defeated Mogae for the State and Party Presidency the following year.    

An ex- soldier, Khama did not find it difficult to breakthrough; he endured the comfort of working with former Army General Mompati Merafhe and the backing of his faction. Merafhe had for many years been part of the central committee as an additional member after suffering hard blows from the strong Kwelagobe- Kedikilwe alliance. Tried and trusted, when he announced his bid for the party chairman, he was seen as the only man strong enough to defeat the alliance.

Khama convincingly outdid Kedikilwe winning with a big margin; this was the end of Kedikilwe’s steadfastness. He would only return in 2012 taking over as a transitional Vice President taking over from Merafhe who was ill at the time.

MASISI’s VICE PRESIDENT

The outcome of the 2017 National Congress might also significantly bring into the picture the face that will ascend to the position of Vice Presidency. This could be someone within the central committee who has party backing and support. The position of Vice-President has always accounted for a smooth political succession. Masire served as Vice-President and Minister of Finance and Development Planning in the government of Sir Seretse Khama, the first President of Botswana. Following Seretse’s death in 1980, Masire ascended to the presidency.

Soon after he assumed the office, Masire chose Lenyeletse Seretse for the position of Vice-President. Lenyeletse Seretse held that position until his death and was succeeded by Peter Mmusi. Mogae succeeded Mmusi and Khama became the Vice President.

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Over 2 000 civil servants interdicted

6th December 2022

Over 2,000 civil servants in the public sector have been interdicted for a variety of reasons, the majority of which are criminal in nature.

According to reports, some officers have been under interdiction for more than two years because such matters are still being investigated. Information reaching WeekendPost shows that local government, particularly councils, has the highest number of suspended officers.

In its annual report, the Directorate on Corruption and Economic Crime (DCEC) revealed that councils lead in corrupt activities throughout the country, and dozens of council employees are being investigated for alleged corrupt activities. It is also reported that disciplined forces, including the Botswana Defence Force (BDF), police, and prisons, and the Directorate of Intelligence and Security (DIS) have suspended a significant number of officers.

The Ministry of Education and Skills Development has also recorded a good number of teachers who have implicated in love relationships with students, while some are accused of impregnating students both in primary and secondary school. Regional education officers have been tasked to investigate such matters and are believed to be far from completion as some students are dragging their feet in assisting the investigations to be completed.

This year, Mmadinare Senior Secondary reportedly had the highest number of pregnancies, especially among form five students who were later forcibly expelled from school. Responding to this publication’s queries, Permanent Secretary to the Office of the President Emma Peloetletse said, “as you might be aware, I am currently addressing public servants across the length and breadth of our beautiful republic. Due to your detailed enquiry, I am not able to respond within your schedule,” she said.

She said some of the issues raised need verification of facts, some are still under investigation while some are still before the courts of law.

Meanwhile, it is close to six months since the Police Commissioner Keabetwe Makgophe, Director General of the Directorate on Corruption and Economic Crime (DCEC) Tymon Katlholo and the Deputy Director of the DIS Tefo Kgothane were suspended from their official duties on various charges.

Efforts to solicit comment from trade unions were futile at the time of going to press.

Some suspended officers who opted for anonymity claimed that they have close to two years while on suspension. One stated that the investigations that led him to be suspended have not been completed.

“It is heartbreaking that at this time the investigations have not been completed,” he told WeekendPost, adding that “when a person is suspended, they get their salary fully without fail until the matter is resolved”.

Makgophe, Katlholo and Kgothane are the three most high-ranking government officials that are under interdiction.

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Masisi to dump Tsogwane?

28th November 2022

Botswana Democratic Party (BDP) and some senior government officials are abuzz with reports that President Mokgweetsi Masisi has requested his Vice President, Slumber Tsogwane not to contest the next general elections in 2024.

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African DFIs gear to combat climate change

25th November 2022

The impacts of climate change are increasing in frequency and intensity every year and this is forecast to continue for the foreseeable future. African CEOs in the Global South are finally coming to the party on how to tackle the crisis.

Following the completion of COP27 in Egypt recently, CEOs of Africa DFIs converged in Botswana for the CEO Forum of the Association of African Development Finance Institutions. One of the key themes was on green financing and building partnerships for resource mobilization in financing SDGs in Africa

A report; “Weathering the storm; African Development Banks response to Covid-19” presented shocking findings during the seminar. Among them; African DFI’s have proven to be financially resilient, and they are fast shifting to a green transition and it’s financing.

COO, CEDA, James Moribame highlighted that; “Everyone needs food, shelter and all basic needs in general, but climate change is putting the achievement of this at bay. “It is expensive for businesses to do business, for instance; it is much challenging for the agricultural sector due to climate change, and the risks have gone up. If a famer plants crops, they should be ready for any potential natural disaster which will cost them their hard work.”

According to Moribame, Start-up businesses will forever require help if there is no change.

“There is no doubt that the Russia- Ukraine war disrupted supply chains. SMMEs have felt the most impact as some start-up businesses acquire their materials internationally, therefore as inflation peaks, this means the exchange rate rises which makes commodities expensive and challenging for SMMEs to progress. Basically, the cost of doing business has gone up. Governments are no longer able to support DFI’s.”

Moribame shared remedies to the situation, noting that; “What we need is leadership that will be able to address this. CEOs should ensure companies operate within a framework of responsible lending. They also ought to scout for opportunities that would be attractive to investors, this include investors who are willing to put money into green financing. Botswana is a prime spot for green financing due to the great opportunity that lies in solar projects. ”

Technology has been hailed as the economy of the future and thus needs to be embraced to drive operational efficiency both internally and externally.

Executive Director, bank of Industry Nigeria, Simon Aranou mentioned that for investors to pump money to climate financing in Africa, African states need to be in alignment with global standards.

“Do what meets world standards if you want money from international investors. Have a strong risk management system. Also be a good borrower, if you have a loan, honour the obligation of paying it back because this will ensure countries have a clean financial record which will then pave way for easier lending of money in the future. African states cannot just be demanding for mitigation from rich countries. Financing needs infrastructure to complement it, you cannot be seating on billions of dollars without the necessary support systems to make it work for you. Domestic resource mobilisation is key. Use public money to mobilise private money.” He said.

For his part, the Minster of Minister of Entrepreneurship, Karabo Gare enunciated that, over the past three years, governments across the world have had to readjust their priorities as the world dealt with the effects and impact of the COVID 19 pandemic both to human life and economic prosperity.

“The role of DFIs, during this tough period, which is to support governments through countercyclical measures, including funding of COVID-19 related development projects, has become more important than ever before. However, with the increasingly limited resources from governments, DFIs are now expected to mobilise resources to meet the fiscal gaps and continue to meet their developmental mandates across the various affected sectors of their economies.” Said Gare.

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