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The mystery of UB financial crisis

There is a famous African proverb which says when a hyena wants to eat its children; it first accuses them of smelling like goats. The expression could not have been more fitting in describing the conundrum in which the University of Botswana (UB) finds itself in — having to fight a mysterious battle to rediscover its value and where it stands in government future plans, writes ALFRED MASOKOLA.


Assistant Minister of Tertiary Education, Research, Science and Technology Fidelis Molao was probably showing just how far government would go to bury the University of Botswana a few months back. The unapologetic Minister stated rather harshly that: “UB should adapt or die.”


The doctor’s prescription, in the opinion of the Assistant Minister, is what the Human Resource Development Council (HRDC) has put on the table as what the country needs in the tertiary education sector; and if the UB does not satisfy that prescription, government would look elsewhere; the most obvious route being privately owned tertiary institutions.


This has infuriated the UB provost. The bitter words to swallow for Vice Chancellor Professor Thabo Fako was being told out of the blue, that the country’s most prestigious learning institution is offering programs which the economy does not desire. Again they were told, vaguely so, to adapt or die.


The first hint of Professor Fako’s aggravation with how things are turning out for UB was last year when he summoned all political parties to a forum at the institution. It is not common that the strategic issues of institutions such as UB could be discussed through such a forum. But Professor Fako, having run out patience and desperate for a solution was convinced it was the most perfect thing to do. Present at the meeting were    Mpho Balopi, the ruling Botswana Democratic Party (BDP) then Secretary General; Dr Phenyo Butale of the Umbrella for Democratic Change (UDC) and also Member of Parliament for the area and Dr Kesitegile Gobotswang representing Botswana Congress Party (BCP).


Fako’s revelations signalled that the UB was facing a crisis in future and pleaded for an honest apolitical debate on the future of the institution fearing that in the absence of such, the institution would fold, as result of mushrooming private institutions. Prof Fako was not impressed by the discriminatory gesture of offering Botswana International University of Science and Technology (BIUST) preferential treatment at the detriment of UB.


Even the BDP vanguard, Balopi was shocked by the state of affairs at UB. His mainstay promise was that he will compile a report and have it submitted to the party leadership with the view of amending the situation. Almost two years later, UB is in a worse crisis than it was a year ago. It is still a mystery what happened to Balopi’s promise. In the absence of that answer, the most two obvious scenarios are that; Balopi compiled the report, submitted to the leadership and it was largely ignored, or marked as not urgent. The second scenario is that Balopi didn’t bother to compile the report at all.


This week, Prof Fako made a daring statement before the parliamentary committee on Statutory Bodies and Enterprises that government should be bold enough to state whether it wants to shut down UB or not, and even said whatever decision government wants to take, it should do so openly, boldly and honestly.


But at government enclave, everyone seems to think that Fako is living in the world of phantasm or has paranoia emanating from the boom in private tertiary institutions. Molao hears no evil and sees no evil in the new government relationship with UB, and to him, Fako is just creating a storm in a tea cup.  He pointed out before that UB should not be heavily reliant on government alone at this point but should have in place self- sustenance mechanisms.


“There is nothing wrong with government no longer giving 100 percent subvention. UB should attracting international students, and our view is that they should be self-sustaining now,” Molao told WeekendPost a few weeks ago. The platitude of Molao’s statement however contrasts how the private institutions having been surviving, with government sponsored students being the only source of income for the institutions -the same model UB is expected not to use. Strictly speaking, a lot of them will close shop if the government was to stop sponsoring students at the institutions.


While government has envisaged increasing access to tertiary education, enrolment numbers at the country’s highest learning institution have been dwindling, and Fako has attributed this to the way government chooses to do business. A report, titled “Tertiary Education at a Glance” published by the HRDC earlier this year, indicates that government’s decision through its policy to sponsor students in registered private tertiary institutions in the country has resulted in significant involvement of the private sector in the provision of tertiary education.


The report stated that the enrolment at tertiary level has almost doubled, rising from 31 129 in the 2007/08 financial year to 60 583 in the 2014/15 financial year. During the 2014/15 financial year, out of the 60 583 students enrolled in tertiary institutions, private tertiary institutions accounted for 42.6 percent of the students. A drastic growth experienced by almost all private institutions.


The projections also indicated that the private sector will be enrolling more students than public schools. Amid the rise in enrolment at private tertiary institutions, owners and directors have been laughing all the way to the bank, as the education sector has now been turned into a dread for profit sector.


The ownership of the institutions, their accreditation and accrediting has been at the centre of debate, and so has been their credibility. Early this year, the ministry of Tertiary Education, acting in cohort with HRDC reached a decision that effectively meant that the following courses; Bachelor of Business Administration (Marketing), Bachelor of Business Administration (Management), Business Information Systems, BEd Adult Education, Diploma in Adult Education, BA Humanities, BA Chinese Studies, BA Pastoral Studies, Diploma in Library and Information Studies, BIS Computer Information Systems, BSc Information Technology, Diploma in Population Studies and Diploma in Social Work would not attract government sponsorship this year.


In Fako’s view, the development means, the ministry is signalling the university should completely shut down some faculties, which could mean unplanned loss of jobs for teaching staff. According to him, government should be able to state what it expects from UB as a public institution, without making isolated decisions which impact negatively on the operations of the university.


“My belief is that, if the government no longer wants the university to offer a certain program, that should be an act of policy, and then we phase out the programme in a gradual manner, not just to pullout the plug,” said Fako. Fako said government should understand that the university has already made some commitments by signing contracts with academic staff and such decisions by government continue to sink the university in crisis.


Apart from the dwindling number of students being enrolled at UB as a result of the sponsorship cessation by government for some courses, Ministry of Tertiary Education has also failed to pay University of Botswana tuition fees for three consecutive financial years.  Prof Fako also indicated that the major challenge faced by UB is government’s decision not to meet the budget as requested by the institutions. The institution requires over P1 billion to cover operational costs, but in the last three years the institution has received less than what they have requested forcing it to exhaust its reserves. In the last three years, the university received P776 million, 714 million and 703 million in the financial year under review.


Fako has openly stated that some private institutions have been given an illusion of being a ‘university’ while in actual fact they are not, given their capacity, resources and the learning environment. “To me a university is a prestigious institution, and the name ‘university’ should be protected. What we are doing is giving children the hope that they are something which they are not,” he said.


The chairman of the committee parliamentary committee, Samson Guma said the confusion caused by the ministry also means that the submissions by the ministry in the National Development Plan 11 is wrong, given that what is allocated to the UB could be inadequate to meet its operational costs in the next coming years.


Fako informed the committee he is preparing a report to be submitted to the ministry, detailing the gravity of the decision taken by government in the last few years and its impact on the university.

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Transgender persons in Botswana live a miserable life

23rd November 2020
Transgender persons

An international report complied in South Africa dubbed ‘Legal Gender Recognition in Botswana’ says that the transgender and gender non-conforming people in Botswana live a miserable life. The community experiences higher levels of discrimination, violence and ill health.

In this report, it has been indicated that this is because their gender identity, which does not conform to narrowly define societal norms, renders them more vulnerable. Gender identity is a social determinant of health, which means that it is a factor that influences people’s health via their social context, their communities and their experiences of social exclusion. The Ministry of Health and Wellness has recognized this, and transgender people are considered a vulnerable population under the Botswana Second National Strategic Framework for HIV and AIDS 2010-2017.

In a recent study that shed light on the lived experiences of transgender and gender non-conforming people in Botswana, transgender persons often experience discrimination because of their gender identity and expression. The study was conducted by the University of Cape Town, LEGABIBO, BONELA, as well as Rainbow Identity Association and approved by the Health Ministry as well as the University of Botswana.

Of the 77 transgender and gender non-conforming people who participated in the study, less than half were employed. Two thirds, which is approximately 67% said that they did not have sufficient funds to cover their everyday needs. Two in five had hidden health concerns from their healthcare provider because they were afraid to disclose their gender identity.

More than half said that because of their gender identity, they had been treated disrespectfully at a healthcare facility (55%), almost half (46%) said they had been insulted at a healthcare facility, and one quarter (25%) had been denied healthcare because of their gender identity.

At the same time, the ‘Are we doing right’ study suggests that transgender and non-conforming people might be at higher risks of experiencing violence and mental ill-health, compared to the general population. More than half had experienced verbal embarrassment because of their gender identity, 48% had experienced physical violence and more than one third (38%) had experienced sexual violence.

The study showed that mental health concerns were high among transgender and gender non-conforming people in Botswana. Half of the transgender and gender non-conforming study participants (53%) showed signs of depression. Between one in four and one in six showed signs of moderate or severe anxiety (22% among transgender women, 24% among transgender men and 17% among gender non-conforming people).

Further, the study revealed that many had attempted suicide: one in three transgender women (32%), more than one in three transgender men (35%) and three in five gender non-conforming people (61%).

International research, as well as research from Botswana, suggests that not being able to change one’s gender marker has a negative impact on access to healthcare and mental health and wellbeing. The study further showed that one in four transgender people in Botswana (25%) had been denied access to healthcare. This is, at least in part, linked to not being able to change one’s gender marker in the identity documents, and thus not having an identity document that matches one’s gender identity and gender expression.

In its Assessment of Legal and Regulatory Framework for HIV, AIDS and Tuberculosis, the Health Ministry noted that “transgender persons in Botswana are unable to access identity documents that reflect their gender identity, which is a barrier to health services, including in the context of HIV. In one documented case, a transwoman’s identity card did not reflect her gender identity- her identity card photo indicated she was ‘male’. When she presented her identity card at a health facility, a health worker called the police who took her into custody.”

The necessity of a correct national identity document goes beyond healthcare. The High Court of Botswana explains that “the national identity document plays a pivotal role in every Motswana’s daily life, as it links him or her with any service they require from various institutions. Most activities in the country require every Motswana to produce their identity document, for identification purposes of receiving services.”

According to the Legal Gender Recognition in Botswana report, this effectively means that transgender, whose gender identity and expression is likely to be different from the sex assigned to them at birth and from what is recorded on their identity document, cannot access services without risk of denial or discrimination, or accusations of fraud.

In this context, gays and lesbians advocacy group LEGABIBO has called on government through the Department of Civil and National Registration to urgently implement the High Court rulings on gender marker changes. As stated by the High Court in the ND vs Attorney General of Botswana judgement, identity cards (Omang) play an important role in the life of every Motswana. Refusal and or delay to issue a Motswana with an Omang is denying them to live a complete and full-filing life with dignity and violates their privacy and freedom of expression.

The judgement clarified that persons can change their gender marker as per the National Registrations Act, so changing the gender marker is legally possible. There is no need for a court order. It further said the person’s gender is self-identified, there is no need to consult medical doctors.

LEGABIBO also called on government to develop regulations that specify administrative procedure to change one’s gender marker, and observing self-determination process. Further, the group looks out for government to ensure members of the transgender community are engaged in the development of regulations.

“We call on this Department of Civil and National Registration to ensure that the gender marker change under the National Registration Act is aligned to the Births and Deaths Registry Act to avoid court order.

Meanwhile, a gay man in Lobatse, Moabi Mokenke was recently viciously killed after being sexually violated in the streets of Peleng, shockingly by his neighbourhood folks. The youthful lad, likely to be 29-years old, met his fate on his way home, from the wearisome Di a Bowa taverns situated in the much populated township of Peleng Central.

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Khato Civils fights back, dares detractors

23rd November 2020
Khato-civil

CEO of Khato Civils Mongezi Mnyani has come out of the silence and is going all way guns blazing against the company’s adversaries who he said are hell-bent on tarnishing his company’s image and “hard-earned good name”

Speaking to WeekendPost from South Africa, Mnyani said it is now time for him to speak out or act against his detractors. Khato Civils has done several projects across Africa. Khato Civils, a construction company and its affiliate engineering company, South Zambezi have executed a number of world class projects in South Africa, Malawi and now recently here in Botswana.

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UDC petitioners turn to Saleshando

23rd November 2020
Dumelang Saleshando

About ten (10) Umbrella for Democratic Change (UDC) parliamentary candidates who lost the 2019 general election and petitioned results this week met with UDC Vice President, Dumelang Saleshando to discuss the way forward concerning the quandary that is the legal fees put before them by Botswana Democratic Party (BDP) lawyers.

For a while now, UDC petitioners who are facing the wrath of quizzical sheriffs have demanded audience with UDC National Executive Committee (NEC) but in vain. However after the long wait for a tete-a-tete with the UDC, the petitioners met with Saleshando accompanied by other NEC members including Dr. Kesitegile Gobotswang, Reverend Mpho Dibeela and Dennis Alexander.

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