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BOCONGO, BCC accuse Gov’t of Economic and Social Injustices


The collapse and ultimate closure of BCL has impacted on the not only economic justice of the Selibe Phikwe residents and surrounding areas. It has more badly eroded the little social justice that was aspired at the then copper mining town.

 

In the light of these, basing its authenticity on its newly adopted strategic plan, Botswana Council of Non-Governmental Organisations (BOCONGO) is riding on partnership of its affiliating member; Botswana Christian Council (BCC) on the ongoing study to identify the social injustices preceding the economic injustices imposed on the people of Selibe Phikwe and surrounding areas through the abrupt and unforeseen closure of the BCL mine.


The ongoing survey has through its preliminary report, of which final report will be made public before the end December 2016, painted a dehumanising impact of the BCL closure on residents, vulnerable communities and families, businesses and the Non-Governmental Organisations that have been serving the dead mining town.

 

The BOCONGO Board Vice Chairperson Mr. Olebile Machete responding to the Weekend Post enquiries as to the exact purpose of the impact survey assessment explained that “we at BOCONGO together with our affiliating partner BCC are of the strong view that inclusive development through democratic ownership involves empowering people as primary beneficiaries, but also as actors in their development”. He continued that what BOCONGO is currently engaged in is just a grain of the new strategy.

 

This study is aimed at BOCONGO and BCC learning the impact of uncertainties from the Selibe Phikwe community and what is going to be of their lives.  BOCONGO expresses that this scenario will essentially impact the whole nation and thus needs mitigation of affiliating BOCONGO members to mitigate.


BOCONGO expresses that, though it does in its new dispensation continues to recognise the Government of Botswana as the most immediate strategic partner, as all the BOCONGO work is strategically aimed at complementing efforts of the Government, it is however concerned at the rate of economic and social injustices where communities have become the victim and Government being the perpetrator.

 

Machete points out that “BOCONGO shall in response to this  prevailing and growing unfortunate fashion and behavior by the Government, thus as guided by the new the new three year strategic plan, endevour to motivate more formal partnerships on delivery of certain targets in specific thematic areas based on our member comparative advantages”.


BOCONGO shall in the next three years 2017 – 2020, guided by its new strategic plan, embark on joint plans within relevant structures and appropriate entities, including government departments where direct and deliberate plans shall be developed, monitored and evaluated to a certain progress and value addition.

 

Machete is quick to emphasise that, as much as possible, the new BOCONGO, having learnt from the past will avoid casual agreements and partnerships and rather will be more legal, constitutional and obliging to ensure concrete efforts towards inclusive development as obligated by its member affiliates at the recent Annual General Meeting where the new strategy was adopted. The new strategy shall be branded and marketed for stakeholder knowledge and buy-in and follow up efforts shall be made to explore opportunities for new partnerships.

 

Machete continued that “BOCONGO readily recognises that the new targets are ambitious and therefore strongly require an aggressive approach to partnership prospecting for co-responsibility and subsidiarity for value addition in service delivery. And we shall be engaging several stakeholders such as BONELA and BOSASNET and other social justice, economic justice and human rights institutions to address social and economic injustices that we find not only in Selibe Phikwe but nationally. We can no longer pretend that the situation is normal”.


Amongst other things coming from the impact assessment survey done by BOCONGO and BCC in Selibe Phikwe is that extracting companies operating in Botswana are not regulated to the benefit of local communities. They make millions from geographical areas and not plant anything back into the communities. The Phikwe pollution has left disastrous health effects. And Machete insists that BOCONGO shall through lobby and advocacy ensure that these issues are addressed and appropriate regulation put in place.

 

“BCL for example should have set up respiratory control and treatment centres funded by the mine. This should have been a pre-requisite to mining and we will be dialoguing with Government and appropriate institutions on the way forward not only for Selibe Phikwe but for other mining areas that are ongoing and that shall arise. We have agreed that if need be we shall frequent the courts to ensure that not only economic justice is met but that social justice be upheld.


The preliminary report carries amongst other things complaints by neighbouring villages such as Sefhophe where the head teachers have already complained to the village chief that they are unable to enroll all students being transferred to their schools from Selibe Phikwe schools. Health facilities are also not coping as luxuries of private hospitals have diminished overnight. These are social pressures that were not taken into consideration when authorities decided to close the mine.

 

BOCONGO expresses worry that “it is not only with the employees that consultation should have been done but it should have also been with authorities in neighbouring villages to prepare for such drastic changes that impact directly on the day to day affairs of their operations in schools, clinics, hospitals etcetera. Micro loans are taking all the monies that have been paid to the former employees and landlords are struggling, it is all economic and social injustice misery that could have been mitigated had things been done in consideration of all affected parties.

Machete also told this publication that the new BOCONGO strategy is aligned to the reality that, in representative democracies, it becomes indispensable to have organised groups like the NGOs effectively working for the people and representing their interests. It is about creating structured and permanent forums for dialogue that includes diversity of thoughts in advising and monitoring development policies, plans and strategies.

 

The main mission of BOCONGO is to provide an enabling environment for the NGO sector to become a recognized partner in the development process in Botswana. “Furthermore, BOCONGO aims to promote experience sharing with other NGOs as well as provide and we shall carry out this mission without a grain of apology”, noted Machete who continued that, human rights norms and standards do not operate in a vacuum, they lead to a conceptualisation of political and social relations between the state and citizens from the perspective of legitimate claims and obligations.

Of central significance is seeing individuals as rights holders and states as duty-bearers. With regards to social protection such a standpoint means that the state is obligated to guarantee economic and social justice and that citizens can claim it.


Machete further emphasised that the new strategy is a focus to ensure that the concept of citizenship, in terms of what is necessary for and meaningful about being a citizen, focuses on important matters such as the quality of relationships between citizens, the distribution and mix of resources necessary for ensuring that relationships are positive in nature.

 

This perspective underscores the value in pursuing a social inclusion agenda undergirded in the idea of social citizenship. Under a social citizenship framework social resources are not granted by the state out of benevolence or other motives but rather are conferred as a right of citizenship. All these point to the painfully felt impact of closure of the BCL mine and based on the increasing inequalities in the country in other areas beyond Selibe Phikwe.


When the Weekend Post asked the BOCONGO Deputy Leader on the position of BOCONGO with regard to SPEDU plan and implementation of the same, he narrated that, according to the World Bank Report, Botswana is the third most unequal country in the world. The government of Botswana has since 1966 delivered myriad mixtures of infrastructure, goods and services with a view to fighting poverty and improving the quality of life of the people.

 

However, this social provision has not made a significant impact on poverty reduction for the majority of the people in the country. “For the funds spent, not enough has been gained in terms of enhancing the overall quality of life by reducing levels of poverty and bridging the widening gap between the rich and the poor and SPEDU if not guarded by the NGO world led by BOCONGO will simply join the fray of lost promises. We shall thus through a lot of activities planned and aligned to our new strategic plan, in robustness, in resoluteness through and with our members, address all these challenges”.

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Gov’t shy to shame failing ministers

22nd February 2021
Morwaeng

Minister of Presidential Affairs, Governance and Public Administration, Kabo Morwaeng together with Permanent Secretary to the President (PSP) Elias Magosi, this week refused to name and shame the worst performing Ministries and to disclose the best performing Ministries since beginning of 12th parliament including the main reasons for underperformance.

Of late there have been a litany of complaints from both ends of the aisle with cabinet members accused of providing parliament with unsatisfactory responses to the questions posed. In fact for some Botswana Democratic Party (BDP) backbenchers a meeting with the ministers and party leadership is overdue to address their complaints. Jwaneng-Mabutsane MP, Mephato Reatile is also not happy with ministers’ performance.

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Bokamoso, Gov’t in P10M womb removal suit

22nd February 2021
Bokamoso

Bokamoso Private Hospital is battling a P10 million legal suit for a botched fibroids operation which resulted in a woman losing an entire womb and her prospects of bearing children left at zero.

The same suit has also befallen the Attorney General of Botswana who is representing the Ministry of Health and Wellness for their contributory negligence of having the unlawful removal of a patient, Goitsemang Magetse’s womb.

According to the court papers, Magetse says that sometimes in November 2019, she was diagnosed with fibroids at Marina Hospital where upon she was referred to Bokamoso Private Hospital to schedule an appointment for an operation to remove the fibroids, which she did.

Magetse continues that at the instance of one Dr Li Wang, the surgeon who performed the operation, and unknown to her, an operation to remove her whole womb was conducted instead.
According to Magetse, it was only through a Marina Hospital regular check-up that she got to learn that her whole womb has been removed.

“At the while she was under the belief that only her fibroids have been removed. By doing so, the hospital has subjected itself to some serious delictual liability in that it performed a serious and life changing operation on patient who was under the belief that she was doing a completely different operation altogether. It thus came as a shock when our client learnt that her womb had been removed, without her consent,” said Magetse’s legal representatives, Kanjabanga and Associates in their summons.

The letter further says, “this is an infringement of our client‘s rights and this infringement has dire consequences on her to the extent that she can never bear children again”. ‘It is our instruction therefore, to claim as we hereby do, damages in the sum of BWP 10,000,000 (ten million Pula) for unlawful removal of client’s womb,” reads Kanjabanga Attorneys’ papers. The defendants are yet to respond to the plaintiff’s papers.

What are fibroids?

Fibroids are tumors made of smooth muscle cells and fibrous connective tissue. They develop in the uterus. It is estimated that 70 to 80 percent of women will develop fibroids in their lifetime — however, not everyone will develop symptoms or require treatment.

The most important characteristic of fibroids is that they’re almost always benign, or noncancerous. That said, some fibroids begin as cancer — but benign fibroids can’t become cancer. Cancerous fibroids are very rare. Because of this fact, it’s reasonable for women without symptoms to opt for observation rather than treatment.

Studies show that fibroids grow at different rates, even when a woman has more than one. They can range from the size of a pea to (occasionally) the size of a watermelon. Even if fibroids grow that large, we offer timely and effective treatment to provide relief.

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Masisi warned against a sinking Botswana

22nd February 2021
Ndaba GAolatlhe

The Alliance for Progressives (AP) President Ndaba Gaolathe has said that despite major accolades that Botswana continues to receive internationally with regard to the state of economy, the prospects for the future are imperilled.

Delivering his party Annual Policy Statement on Thursday, Gaolathe indicated that Botswana is in a state of do or die, and that the country’s economy is on a sick bed. With a major concern for poverty, Gaolathe pointed out that almost half of Botswana’s people are ravaged by or are about to sink into poverty.  “Our young people have lost the fire to dream about what they could become,” he said.

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