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BPOPF pushes 90 billion pula target

Following the decision by the Botswana Public Officers Pension Fund (BPOPF) to move some of its services in-house and terminate the Alexandra Forbes administrative functions’ contract, Botswana’s richest fund and arguably one of the wealthiest institutions in the land is set to bolster its wealth accumulation and asset expansion business.


Speaking to their 5 year strategy set to commence next year January, the BPOPF Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Boitumelo Molefhe indicated that by the end of the 5 years in 2022, the Fund’s treasury in assets worth, will be sitting at a whopping 90 billion pula.

Speaking at a press briefing recently, Molefhe said BPOPF will to do so simultaneously empowering Batswana to venture into the asset management business.  She said her organization will play its part by awarding new contracts to asset managers that have at least 25% citizen ownership, and 50% locals’ representation in their Boards, and having a minimum of 70 % Batswana in their company executive management.

Molefhe who is a former Finance Chief at Debswana Pension Fund observed that the new guidelines are just the starting point for more citizen empowerment initiatives in the lucrative capital assets and fund management industry. She added that they will review the guidelines from time to time in order to give citizen owned firms more share in the business.

“The 25% is just the starting point, going forward the plan is to continuously review the threshold upwards. The intention is not to leave anyone out but to empower citizens. We have a lot of talented citizens that are doing most of the work for fund managers but are not appropriately remunerated,” she said.

Molefhe explained that they are not just about the talk, emphasizing that there will be a clear compliance framework to ensure robust implementation of these guidelines. “As for the fund managers already mandated with our assets, they will have to comply and meet our new guidelines, if at all they desire to be reengaged because most of their contracts end around February 2018,” she said.

BPOPF is of the view that their assets and capital should be managed by locals as the wealth is generated locally from Batswana public servants. “We cannot have most of the profits from our fund being taken outside the country, if a newly mandated fund manager doesn’t comply in the first year, we will reduce the size of their mandate by 10% and if non-compliance stretches to the second year, then BPOPF will withdraw the mandate totally,” she said.

BPOPF currently does millions worth of business with BIFM, Investec, African Alliance just to mention but a few. The inspiration that Batswana can bite big in the capital asset management business comes from Afena Capital, one of BPOPF mandated fund managers taking care of millions worth of assets and is 100 % owned by Batswana.

In addition, BPOPF revealed that they have half a billion pula ready to finance local asset management startups. “We are willing to inject 500 million pula to finance this bid to see more citizens venture into the capital investment management industry, we will also incubate these businesses to see them through until full establishment as they service back our loans,” Molefhe explained.

She added that they will do so by handholding fledging firms that have less than a billion pula asset management mandate, only those with 100% citizen ownership and at least 50 % locals in senior management. “The incubation is open to all asset classes and we want the businesses to eventually stand on their own and compete in the big league while also transferring skills to locals,” she added.

THE FIVE YEAR STRATEGY

Unpacking the 5 years strategy of which the new guidelines will apply to, Molefhe explained that their asset base has grown from P51 billion in 2015 to P55 billion today. However she noted that although the Fund asset value grew to P55 billion, total returns for its active and deferred members fell to 4.25% from 13.73% in the previous year due to the volatility in both the domestic and global markets. Currently BPOPF has 58% of its portfolio invested offshore.

“We will invest more in private equity and other asset classes such as infrastructure and property to diversify our portfolio amid low growth in the stock and bonds markets,” she said.  According to Molefhe, the BPOPF has also appointed a German company, Monrovia Capital as its new private equity fund manager, effective January 2017.

BPOPF is the largest in Botswana housing over 150 000 members and have over 23 billion pula asset worth in Botswana. One of the Fund’s traditional cash spinning investments includes local mobile network giant, Mascom Wireless. BPOPF is the single largest institutional investor on the Botswana Stock Exchange (BSE) owning a significant stake in 19 of the 22 companies listed on Thapelo Tsheole’s P48 billion domestic stock market.

 

The Fund further owns 16 % of stake in Barclays Botswana, around 25 percent in Botswana Insurance Holdings Limited (BIHL), the diversified financial services firm which has a major stake in other major companies such as the titanic micro-lender, Letshego Holdings Limited and Funeral Services Group (FSG).

Furthermore, Molefhe’s investment drive saw BPOPF recently acquiring shares worth P21 million in tourism company, Wilderness Safaris. The Fund also has a 23 percent stake in Chobe Holdings, another travel and tours operator. The two are the largest and only listed safari services firms. BPOPF owns around 12 percent in the regional fast growing supermarket group, Choppies Enterprises.

 

As if it is not enough, BPOPF also owns a significant stake in listed petroleum services firm Engen Botswana, at 13.7 percent, First National Bank Botswana (FNBB) is the largest company trading on the BSE, BPOPF owns 13.4 percent of Steven Bogatsu’s 8.8 billion pula chunk. BPOPF also owns 10 percent in the security services giant, G4S, and a further 9 %  in industrial property company, Letlole La Rona (LLR).

 

One of the biggest companies on the BSE, Letshego, also a pan-African micro-finance firm is 23 percent owned by BPOPF directly.  
BPOPF investments are endless, for instance in the New African Properties (NAP), a company that owns the classic Riverwalk Mall in Gaborone, BPOPF owns over 167 million shares. It further has a 17 percent stake in another property firm, Prime Time Holdings, as well as RDC Properties at 8.13 percent.

 

In Sechaba Breweries Holdings, the brewers of St Louis Lager, BPOPF owns 22 percent. The fund has a controlling stake in Sefalana, Choppies’ largest competitor, at 33 percent. It has 8.6 percent in Standard Chartered Bank Botswana and around 30 percent in Turnstar, the owners of Game City and Mlimani City malls.

A number of lucrative investment under  property portfolio also  includes the 300 million pula injected in Central Business Department(CBD) to erect the Hilton Garden Inn Hotel and the purchase of two strategic properties at the fast growing  second city, Francistown from Prime Time Properties at tune of P71 million. BPOPF property investment is worth over P1.5 billion including other transactions, of which the mandate is being handled by asset manager, Messidor.

BPOPF Chief Executive Molefhe however expresses worry over their BSE Investment which she observed to be trading southwards since the beginning of the year. Under the new guidelines commenced and encored on Molefhe’s vision 2022, BPOPF will introduce initiatives to encourage skills transfer, local procurement of goods and services such as back office services like performance reports, accounting and compliance, and HR services.

“We have seen instances where the feedback reports we get from our fund managers are complied outside the country including other back office functions such as accounting. We need such services to be done here in Botswana so that skills are transferred to locals,” she said.

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Business

4 Best crypto projects for Africans to invest in

25th January 2022
Bitcoin

Cryptocurrencies have become the talk of the town, a major bone of contention for some and an opportunity towards new investment frontiers for others.

For many African economies, cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin have become major game-changers, allowing vendors to avoid the evils of inflation, and allowing new and dynamic African investors to take advantage of crypto’s soaring prices.

Outside of Bitcoin, other crypto projects have also taken precedent and provided investors with new frontiers within the cryptocurrency realm. In this article, we explore the four best crypto projects in 2022 for Africans to invest in.

1.     Polkadot

Polkadot is often referred to as a ‘blockchain of blockchains’ whose main objective is to facilitate the building of new networks and make this easier for developers.

It allows users to develop new blockchains that work in concert with current ones without relying on complicated bridging protocols.

The network enables these chains to be entirely configurable without sacrificing the underlying security and safety. The most extensive capability of Polkadot, however, is powering the Web 3.0 revolution.

2.     Yellow Card

Yellow Card was launched in 2016 by Chris Maurice and Justin Poiroux with the intention of enabling Africans at home and abroad to purchase and sell Bitcoin using their local currency via bank transfer, cash, and mobile money.

The firm was formally launched in 2019 in Nigeria where it has over 35,000 merchants and was believed to have processed more than US$165 million in crypto remittances in 2020 alone. That same year, it expanded operations to South Africa and Botswana and raised $1.5m seed capital to offer its services in Kenya and Cameroon.

In 2021, Yellow Card will be adding new capabilities to facilitate more frictionless transactions. The app will support some local languages, including Igbo, Arabic, Afrikaans, French, Hausa, Luganda, Mandarin, Portuguese, and Swahili.

3.     Solana

Currently one of the fastest crypto networks around, Solana spearheads the research and implementation of contemporary technologies like dApps and smart contracts. It is one of the only tokens that can operate both on a proof-of-history and a proof-of-stake consensus scheme. The SOL network also handles more than 50,000 transactions every second, the quickest so far.

While Solana was not the first network to utilize smart contracts, it today has more than 350 distinct projects running on its network. It also restored more than 17,000 percent of its value in the previous 12 months, presently standing as one of the top 10 currencies by market cap, valued at $53 billion roughly.

4.     Akoin City

Akon is creating a futuristic $6 billion Akon City in Senegal, which will use the akoin cryptocurrency (AKN) as its primary currency.

As of November 11, 2020, akoin began trading on Bittrex Global versus BTC and USDT as a pilot for Akon Metropolis and was made available for payment in a tech city in Kenya the next year.

Estimated 20,000 workers are expected to be paid in the akoin cryptocurrency by the end of 2021, with 35,000 citizens and more than 2,000 retailers expected to use the system.

Also read: 8 Best Forex Brokers for Beginners in Botswana

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Business

Household credit increases to P44.8 billion 

24th January 2022
FNB

Commercial Banks credit increased by 7.4 percent  year-on-year in September 2021, higher than the 4.4 percent growth in the corresponding period in 2020, according to the Bank of Botswana’s Financial Stability report released last week.  The acceleration in commercial bank credit growth was largely due to the higher growth in household credit over the review period. 

In addition, credit growth has been trending upwards since the end of the 2021 first quarter, partly reflecting base effects associated with the fall in credit in the previous year 2020, and an improvement in demand for and supply of credit.  Household credit increased to P44.8 billion in September 2021, from P41.3 billion in September 2020, on the back of a significant increase of 11percent in personal loans.

Business loans, on the other hand, increased by 5.5 percent over the period under review, due to an increase in credit to parastatals and finance sectors.  However, loans extended to the mining, electricity and water, construction, trade, restaurants and bars, manufacturing and transport and communications sectors decreased.  The share of business credit to total credit decreased from 35.2 percent in September 2020 to 34.6 percent in September 2021, while that of households increased from 64.8 percent to 65.4 percent during the same period.

Total credit as a percentage of GDP grew steadily between 2010 and 2020, at an average rate of 12.4 percent. The Bank of Botswana says Credit growth is in line with its long-term trend and thus not likely to overheat the economy. “In this context, there is scope for increased, disciplined and prudent credit extension to support economic activity” experts at the Central Bank noted.  Commercial banks’ leverage ratio was 7.8 percent in August 2021, a decrease from the 8.5 percent in August 2020; but indicative of the banking sector’s strength to withstand negative shocks, according to BoB.

Furthermore, commercial banks’ average capital adequacy ratio was 18.5 percent in August 2021, thus according to the Bank of Botswana, indicating the sector’s resilience to unexpected losses.  The BoB says the banking industry’s strong capital base is further augmented by the modest level of non-performing loans (NPLs) to total loans ratio of 3.7 percent in August 2021 (4.5 percent in August 2020).  However, the full effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on corporate performance, banks’ level of NPLs, profitability and capitalization are yet to be observed.

Zooming into the household space the financial stability report observed that households’ vulnerability to sudden and sharp changes in financial conditions.  Household credit grew by 8.5 percent in the twelve months to September 2021, higher than the 7.4 percent growth recorded in the year to September 2020.  The relatively higher growth rate of household credit was due to base effects and an improvement in credit conditions, both supply and demand.

Credit to households continued to dominate total commercial bank credit, at P44.8 billion (65.4 percent) in September 2021 and was mostly concentrated in unsecured lending (72.5 percent).  The proportion of unsecured loans to total credit remains higher than the 24.4 percent and 30.8 percent reported in South Africa and Namibia, respectively.

Experts at the Central Bank have cautioned that the significant share of unsecured loans and advances has the potential to cause household financial distress, given the inherently expensive and short-term nature of such credit. “Therefore, households remain vulnerable to sudden and sharp tightening of financial conditions”  However, the BoB noted that household debt is aligned to trends in income. Household debt as a proportion of household income is estimated at 37.5 percent in the third quarter of 2021, a decrease from the 47 percent in the same period in 2020.

This ratio according to the BoB remains relatively low when compared to the 79.9 percent and 75 percent for Namibia and South Africa, respectively.  “In this respect, domestic household borrowing is in line with trends in personal incomes, implying a relatively strong debt servicing capacity” the bank said Consequently, the ratio of household NPLs to total household credit was modest at 3.5 percent in June 2021, slightly lower than the 3.9 percent in June 2020 and significantly better than the industry average of 4.1 percent in June 2021.

Household borrowing also dominates credit granted by the Non-Banking Financial Services (NBFIs) sector, although the level of household exposure in the sector remains relatively low compared to that of commercial banks.  The level of household indebtedness in Botswana is, however, considered low by international standards, at 24.9 percent of GDP in the first quarter of 2021, compared to, for example, 26.2 percent, 33.9 percent and 52.8 percent for Mauritius, Namibia and South Africa, respectively.

The quality of bank credit improved in August 2021 as indicated by the decline in the ratio of non-performing loans (NPLs) to total loans to 3.7 percent in August 2021, from 4.5 percent in August 2020.  The Bank of Botswana advised that to maintain low to modest NPLs and help vulnerable groups in the context of COVID-19 induced economic disturbances, there is need to keep in place targeted support to illiquid but solvent firms and affected households and make the support state-contingent or conditional to reduce moral hazard.

Experts at the Bank underscored that overall, “there is no indication of excessive and rapid credit growth that could threaten the stability of the financial system”  Average daily market liquidity in the banking system fell to P5.4 billion in October 2021 from P6.2 billion in September 2021.  The fall in market liquidity is due to persistent foreign exchange outflows. Nevertheless, banks continued to comply with the minimum liquid asset ratio requirement of 10 percent and supported moderate growth in demand for credit, with a financial intermediation ratio of 81.3 percent in August 2021, which is slightly above the desired range of 50 – 80 percent.

Commercial banks’ funding structure continues to be concentrated in a few large depositors, mainly business deposits, highlighting potential funding risks due to the undiversified deposit base.  This notwithstanding, funding risks are mitigated by the inherently long-term structure of bank deposits, mainly fixed deposits, thus giving banks an opportunity to respond accordingly in case of short-term funding shocks.

In August 2021, fixed deposits (including savings deposits) accounted for 46 percent of the deposit base and were further augmented by the 27 percent for checking/current accounts, which are behaviourally stable/core deposits. In terms of macro-financial interlinkages and contagion risk, banks continue to have significant linkages with the rest of the financial system and the real sector.

The strong interconnectedness between the banking system and NBFIs, as well as the non-financial sector (households and corporates) pose a risk of contagion in the domestic financial system, although effective regulation across the system, as well as proper governance and accountability structures moderate the risk.  Furthermore, most of the retail and household loans have credit life protection, mortgage repayment policies and retrenchment cover policies provided by insurance companies, effectively shifting banking risks to the insurance sector.

 

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Minergy pounces on market undersupply

24th January 2022
Minergy

As major mining companies leave the coal business, under pressure to comply with international campaigns of clean energy, local junior coal producer Minergy says it stands ready to rise to the occasion and service the demand in the regional market. 

On Thursday, the company, which unearths thermal coal from its wholly owned Masama Mine near Medie village in the South East District of Botswana provided a market update to its investors and stakeholders for the six months period ending December 2021.  Minergy is listed on the Botswana Stock Exchange, backed by Government investment arms Botswana Development Corporation (BDC) and Mineral Development Company Botswana (MDC), the company started producing first saleable coal from Masama in August 2019.

The company said it expects the international pricing for Southern Africa coal to remain high, driven by the continued China/Australian standoff and Indonesian export restrictions. “Coal supply is under pressure, with demand increasing as several majors divest from coal given the negative coal narrative. Minergy expects an undersupply in the regional market as a result,” said a statement from the company.  During the second half of the year 2021 substantial progress was made towards reaching nameplate capacity at the Masama Coal Mine.

Achievements included producing the highest six-monthly volumes across all disciplines since the inception of the mine. With support from its mining contractor, Minergy said is now capable of achieving nameplate capacity of 125,000 tonnes per month.  Overburden volumes increased fourfold versus the comparative six-month period. A similar trend was evident in the amount of coal that was extracted, with growth of 100% being achieved. Record tonnage in excess of 110,000 tonnes of coal was mined in October 2021.

Stage 4 of the Processing Plant (Rigid Screening and Stock Handling section) was also successfully commissioned. Plant construction is thus complete, and is now fully operational as designed.  Resulting benefits include savings in processing costs, a stabilised supply, and further support for achieving nameplate capacity.  Daily average feed rates increased significantly and are being consistently achieved. Processed volumes increased in line with mining data, with yields remaining stable, and a record throughput of 108,000 tonnes was achieved in October 2021.

However, lower volumes were recorded during November and December 2021, impacted by the new COVID-19 variant and the related effect on workforce availability and border access, as well as by rain interruptions and lower regional sales as explained below. Minergy said with the nameplate capacity now achievable, going forward strategic focus will now be on sales to support the increased saleable product.

This will enable Minergy to generate sufficient cash flow to stabilise the business. Major cement and steel producers have, however, notified Minergy of plant shutdowns early in 2022. Alternative placement of product will be sought. In terms of the secondary listing, the company says the listing on an internationally recognised stock exchange remains an important strategic objective.  “However, affordability and timing are key considerations, which are constantly being evaluated,” said Chief Executive Officer Morné du Plessis.

The ordinary share capital raise, approved by shareholders in February 2021, has garnered interest and Minergy is actively engaging with interested parties to progress this. Plessis noted that Eskom’s future strategy remains unclear, given the ambiguous messages broadcast by the power utility in recent months, and Minergy is waiting feedback on the requirements for coal supply into the South African power station market.

Minergy believes that countries such as Botswana and Namibia will pursue power independence from South Africa (illustrated by the Botswana tender and discussions with interested parties in Namibia) and finds itself located centrally to supply both South Africa and southern African countries.  Minergy is also basing its fortunes on multibillion pula coal fueled power plant deal with Botswana Government.

The Botswana Government, through the Ministry of Mineral Resources, Green Technology and Energy Security (“MMGE”), has invited the Minergy and three other selected local bidders to tender for the design, finance, construction, ownership, operation, maintenance and decommissioning at the end of its economic life (minimum 30 years) of a 300MW (Net) Greenfields Coal-Fired Power Plant in Botswana, as an Independent Power Producer (“IPP”).

This forms part of the government’s 11th National Development and Integrated Resources Plan. It is expected that the power plant would be operational by 2026. The closing date for the bid is currently 30 March 2022. Minergy is partnering with Jarcon Power to submit the bid.  If successful, Minergy Coal will be responsible for providing coal to the power plant for the duration of the Power Purchase Agreement of 30 years, and other income streams are also being envisaged.

This profitable sale of coal will have the benefit of ensuring a steady cash flow to  Minergy, utilisation of current uneconomical coal seams and diversifying income streams. Importantly, Minergy is the only bidder to have an operational mine.

 

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