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PPADB reforms public procurement system

The Public Procurement and Assets Disposal Board (PPADB) has introduced public procurement reforms following some qualms from the World Bank about secrecy surrounding the country’s procurement plans.


The PPADB has since moved to introduce the publishing of public procurement plans. The Ministerial Tender Committees (MTC) and District Administration Tender Committees (DATCs) are now required to submit their annual procurement plans with the board for publishing. MTCs and DATCs deal with procurement of goods, services and works which are below P300 million in value. The MTC financial ceiling range from P25 million to P300 million while ceilings for DATCs range from P2 million to P10 million.


In 2013, a World Bank report indicated that lack of publishing of procurement plans by government and other procuring entities exposed the country’s procurement system to abuse and corruption by those in decision making positions. Best practices in public procurement, as set by institutions such as the World Bank and Organisation for Economic Co-operation Development (OECD) requires that the government and other procuring departments should avail all information about upcoming government tenders to allow bidders a fair chance to prepare themselves to participate.


In the past, the knowledge of upcoming government tenders was the preserve of those in decision making positions, giving them the opportunity to collude with others in the private sector by giving them unfair advantage to win the tenders. Other players only got to know of the tenders when they were advertised for bidding, which did not give them ample time to prepare to compete.


According to the OECD, corruption thrives on secrecy. Therefore they want to make transparency and accountability recognised key conditions for promoting integrity and preventing corruption in public procurement. The PPADB has also introduced the whistle blowing policy, which is viewed as key in public procurement to enable stakeholders to be able to report matters relating to improper, unethical and inappropriate conduct in tendering.  


The management of the Tip-Off service was outsourced to Deloitte and Touche, which won the tender in January this year “to enhance the confidentiality of the system”. PPADB Executive Chairperson, Bridget Poppy John has also indicated that the board is working on drafting the Anti-Corruption Policy, further stating that the integrity office is being established to provide more focus on ethical conduct and anti-corruption measures.


In the past, the PPADB admitted to not having qualified human resource in the field of procurement for MTCs and DATCs to execute tenders in an effective manner. Botswana Accountancy College (BAC) has been engaged by the board to offer a Certificate in Public Sector Procurement and Tender Process Management which was developed in collaboration with the PPADB.


The BAC is also working on developing a Master in Procurement and Logistics programme. The University of Botswana was engaged by the World Bank in 2016 to provide technical input in the development. The OECD indicates that public procurement is increasingly recognised as a strategic profession, rather than a simple administrative function that plays a central role in preventing mismanagement, waste and potential corruption, therefore encouraging entities to attract and retain highly skilled professionals.


The World Bank has also underrated Botswana’s public procurement in the area of “Bid opening, Evaluation, and Award,” scoring 43 out of 100 in its latest assessment. Public procurement is viewed as a sensitive subject because it involves the spending of public funds in project which the government is expected to get in value for money.  


Botswana, which is still reforming, is expected to have in place practices such as publishing procurement policies, advanced publication of procurement plans, advertisement of tender notices, disclosure of evaluation criteria in solicitation documents, publication of contract awards and prices paid, establishing appropriate and timely complaint mechanisms, implementing financial and conflict of interest, disclosure requirements for public procurement officials and publishing supplier sanction lists.


However the government advertising ban on private newspapers could be a major dent on the country’s procurement system.  Ministries and other government departments only advertise their tenders in government owned Daily News, contrary to best practices which state that tender notices should be widely advertised.  


The PPADB has a partnership with the OECD which supports governments in reforming their public procurement systems to ensure cost savings and better service delivery. The OECD promotes efficient and effective public procurement systems because it considers public procurement the backbone of a well-functioning government that ensures delivery of quality services to the public.


Botswana’s economy as a developing country means government continues to be the main player and the biggest provider of business to the private sector. Government expenditure through public procurement activities represents about seventy percent of the Gross Domestic Product. This essentially means the well functioning of the economy in Botswana solely rests on the efficiency and the integrity of its public procurement system when compared to most developed countries where public procurement accounts to a less percentage of up to 20 percent.


The primary mandate of PPADB is to adjudicate and award tenders for Central Government and any other institutions specified under the Act for the delivery of works, services and supplies related services. This is coupled with the registration and grading of contractors who so wish to do business with government.

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Woman swindled out of P62 000 by fake CID officers

17th June 2021
Motube

Botswana Police Service (BPS) has indicated concern about the ongoing trend where the general public falls victim to criminals purporting to be police officers.

According to BPS Assistant Commissioner, Dipheko Motube, the criminals target individuals at shopping malls and Automated Teller Machines (ATMs) where upon approaching the unsuspecting individual the criminals would pretend to have picked a substantial amount of money and they would make a proposal to the victims that the money is counted and shared in an isolated place.

“On the way, as they stop at the isolated place, they would start to count and sharing of the money, a criminal syndicate claiming to be Criminal Investigation Department (CID) officer investigating a case of stolen money will approach them,” said Motube in a statement.

The Commissioner indicated that the fake police officers would instruct the victims to hand over all the cash they have in their possession, including bank cards and Personal Identification Number (PIN), the perpetrators would then proceed to withdraw money from the victim’s bank account.

Motube also revealed that they are also investigating a case in which a 69 year old Motswana woman from Molepolole- who is a victim of the scam- lost over P62 000 last week Friday to the said perpetrators.

“The Criminal syndicate introduced themselves as CID officers investigating a case of robbery where a man accompanying the woman was the suspect.’’

They subsequently went to the woman’s place and took cash amounting to over P12 000 and further swindled amount of P50 000 from the woman’s bank account under the pretext of the further investigations.

In addition, Motube said they are currently investigating the matter and therefore warned the public to be vigilant of such characters and further reminds the public that no police officer would ask for bank cards and PINs during the investigations.

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BCP walks out of UDC meeting

15th June 2021
Boko and Saleshando

Botswana Congress Party (BCP) leadership walked out of Umbrella for Democratic Change (UDC) National Executive Committee (NEC) meeting this week on account of being targeted by other cooperating partners.

UDC meet for the first time since 2020 after previous futile attempts, but the meeting turned into a circus after other members of the executive pushed for BCP to explain its role in media statements that disparate either UDC and/or contracting parties.

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Katlholo wins against DPP

15th June 2021
DCEC DIRECTOR: Tymon Katlholo

The Director General of the Directorate on Corruption and Economic Crimes (DCEC), Tymon Katlholo’s spirited fight against the contentious transfers of his management team has forced the Office of the President to rescind the controversial decision. However, some insiders suggest that the reversal of the transfers may have left some interested parties with bruised egos and nursing red wounds.

The transfers were seen by observers as a badly calculated move to emasculate the DCEC which is seen as defiant against certain objectionable objectives by certain law enforcement agencies – who are proven decisionists with very little regard for the law and principle.

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