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Experts urge Gov’t to develop coal industry

Leading minds in the coal industry have reiterated that robust steps must be taken to develop a world class coal industry that can attract global capital and major investment players in turn birthing rigorous industrialization in Botswana. This they say can help in job creation and further diversification of the economy.

This emerged during the Botswana Resource Sector Conference held at the GICC this week. Latest prospected reserves indicate that Botswana sits on over 200 billion tonnes of coal deposits of which contain different segments of grade value as per economically minable mineralization. Already, a number of companies, mostly of Australian origin are on the ground exploring the economic mineralization of the coal deposits.

Andre Boje, Chief Executive Officer of Minergy, delivered a mouthwatering piece on the development of Botswana’s Coal Industry. Boje said though Coal was viewed as a non environmental source of energy its industrial value cannot go unnoticed, adding that it could be mined with environmental precautions in place. Boje said major mining companies in the world were making record profits from their coal divisions. He further cited that the International price of seaborne thermal coal was at levels last seen in 2007.

He is of the view that with regional and international shortages, Botswana with its abundant untapped reserves was better placed to emerge as a major player in the Global Coal industry. “Botswana coal is high quality and economical to mine,” he said. He also noted that the coal industry has acknowledged the impact of fossil fuels on the environment and have worked for decades on clean coal technology. According to Boje Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS), High Efficiency Low Emission (HELE) was some of the mining and coal utilization models that are regarded environmentally friendly. “Modern coal fired power plants using these technologies have reduced emissions to levels comparable to gas fired powered plants,” he said.

The International Energy Agency reported in their 2016 World Energy Outlook report that coal will remain the largest single source of electricity generation through to 2040. Boje highlighted that coal still accounted for up 41% of global electricity generation and 29% of primary energy demand.

“There are 1,600 coal fired power plants either being planned or under construction in 62 countries which will, without older plant decommissioning, expand the world’s coal-fired capacity by 43%,” he said, adding that coal will continue to  play a major role in delivering energy access and security long into  the future.

“All this aforementioned factors and facts about the global coal stands present a lucrative opportunity for Botswana which sits on top of one of the world’s largest untapped reserve,” he said. The Minergy Botswana Chief also added that the abundance of coal presented lucrative opportunity for Botswana to engage more independent power producers and output excess power for regional and continental export hence generating revenue and creating much needed employment. “The coal here is economical to mine. Government just needs to reduce bottlenecks and wipe off cumbersome processes which sometimes frustrate our capital mobilization efforts in the stock markets,” he said.


Boje also noted that currently 620 million Africans rely on firewood, kerosene and charcoal for cooking, heating and lighting. “600,000 Africans, mainly women and children, die prematurely annually due to illnesses caused by this.” He further added that Africa was facing alarming rates of deforestation due to firewood extraction citing that Zambia alone loses 250,000 hectares annually. “The situation in Zambia present yet another massive business opportunity for our coal –independent power producers, creating even more revenue on direct uptake, royalties and taxation,” he said.

It also emerged that traditional and long time regional supplier of electricity,   South African Power giant, Eskom, was reaching coal cliff with no green fields projects on the drawing board, further presenting a major opportunity for Botswana based power producers or direct export of Coal to South Africa.

Another Coal miner, Shumba Energy, represented by its Managing Director Mashale Phumaphi revealed that significant deposits of the Botswana Coal reserves were high grade for industrial purposes apart from power production. He noted that the Coal –Liquefaction proposition can materialize and create thousands of jobs for Batswana, boost government revenue through taxation and royalties. “We are talking about a setup that will create thousands of jobs for skilled and semi skilled personnel in high volumes for this country,” he said.

Phumaphi added that other value chain business opportunities would emerge in the process wherever the plant would be set.  Botswana Government has since embarked through its fuel commercial entity, Botswana Oil Limited, on a robust investment wooing quest to attract capital for the multibillion pula plant. Government said the project would be too steep to fund from public treasury.

Phumaphi also added that Botswana Coal can birth various industrial processing businesses like production of petroleum reactants, uptake on steel production, cement manufacturing in turn creating more jobs from these various industries. Government was urged to invest in the logistical infrastructure, moves to remove regulatory bottlenecks and accelerate approval timeframes. It was also underscored that review of the coal industry tax structure to negate the logistical disadvantage to RSA coal exports was long overdue.

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Debswana-Botswana Oil P8 billion fuel partnership to create 100 jobs

18th May 2022
Head-of-Stakeholder-Relations

The partnership between Debswana and Botswana Oil Limited (BOL) which was announced a fortnight ago will create under 100 direct jobs, and scores of job opportunities for citizens in the value chain activities.

In a major milestone, Debswana and BOL jointly announced that the fuel supply to Debswana, which was in the past serviced by foreign companies, will now be reserved for citizen companies. The total value of the project is P8 billion, spanning a period of five years.

“About 88 direct jobs will be created through the partnership. These include some jobs which will be transferred from the current supplier to the new partnership,” Matida Mmipi, Head of Stakeholder Relations at Botswana Oil, told BusinessPost.

“We believe this partnership will become a blueprint for other citizen initiatives, even in other sectors of the economy. Furthermore, this partnership has succeeded in unlocking opportunities that never existed for ordinary citizens who aspire to grow and do business with big companies like Debswana.”

Mmipi said through this partnership, BOL and Debswana intend to impact citizen owned companies in the fuel supply value chain that include transportation, supply, facilities maintenance, engineering, customs clearance, trucks stops and its support activities such as workshop / maintenance, tyre services, truck wash bays among others.

“The number of companies to be on-boarded will be determined by the economics at the time of engagement,” she said. BOL will play a facilitatory role of handholding and assisting emerging citizen-owned fuel supply and fuel transportation companies to supply Debswana’s Jwaneng and Orapa Letlhakane Damtshaa (OLDM) mines with diesel and petrol for their operations.

“BOL expects to increase citizen companies’ market share in the fuel supply and transportation industries, which have over the years been dominated by foreign-owned suppliers. Consequently, the agreement will also ensure security of supply for Debswana operations, which are a mainstay of the Botswana economy,” Mmipi said.

“Furthermore, BOL will, under this agreement, transfer skills to citizen suppliers and transporters during the contract period and ensure delivery of competent and skilled citizen suppliers and transport companies upon completion of the agreement.”

Mmipi said the capacitating by BOL is limited to providing citizen companies oil industry technical capability and capacity to deliver on the requirements of the contract, when asked on helping citizen companies to access funding.

“BOL’s mandate does not include financing citizen empowerment initiatives. Securing funding will remain the responsibility of the beneficiaries. This could be through government financing entities including CEDA or through commercial banks. Further to this, there are financial institutions that have already signed up to support the Debswana Citizen Economic Empowerment Programme (CEEP),” Mmipi indicated.

While BOL is established by government as company limited by guarantee, it will not benefit financially from the partnership with Debswana, as citizen empowerment in the petroleum value chain is core to BOL’s mandate.

“BOL does not pursue citizen facilitation for financial benefit, but rather we engage in citizen facilitation as a social aspect of our mandate. Citizen facilitation comes at a cost, but it is the right thing to do for the country to develop the oil and gas industry,” she said.

Mmipi said supplying fuel to Debswana comes with commercial benefits such as supply margins. These have traditionally been made outside the country when supply was done by multi-nationals for a period spanning over 50 years. With BOL anchoring supply for Debswana, this benefit will accrue locally, and BOL will be able to pay taxes and dividends to the shareholders in Botswana.

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VAT in Africa Guide 2022 – Africa re-emerging

18th May 2022

PwC Africa has presented the eighth edition of the VAT in Africa Guide – Africa re-emerging. This backdrop of renewal informs on the re-emergence of African economies and societies which have been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

In this edition, which has been compiled by PwC Africa’s indirect tax experts, covers a total of 41 African countries. It is geared towards sharing insight with our clients based on the constantly changing tax environments that can have a significant impact on business operations.

Within Africa, governments continue to focus on expanding the tax net by improving revenue collection through efficient compliance systems and procedures. PwC Africa has observed that revenue authorities also continue to take a keen interest in indirect taxes as part of revenue mobilisation initiatives.

Maturing VAT system and upskilling SARS 

“In South Africa, VAT is becoming more relevant as a revenue source for the government,” says Matthew Besanko, PwC South Africa’s Indirect Tax Leader. “Strides have been made to upskill South African Revenue Service (SARS) staff and identify VAT revenue leakages, particularly in respect of foreign suppliers of electronic services to people and businesses in South Africa.”

Broadening the tax base and digital economy

In the past year, South Africa, Mozambique and Zimbabwe saw updates to their VAT legislation, or introduced specific legislation targeting electronically supplied services (ESS), which is in line with the global trend of attempting to tax the digital economy. “The expectation is that Botswana will also introduce VAT legislation in due course, while the National Treasury in South Africa has also made mention of revising the rules to account for further developments in the digital economy,” Besanko says.

South Africa’s National Treasury has also drafted legislation with the intention to introduce a reverse charge on gold, which is expected to come into effect later in 2022. While in Zimbabwe, revenue authorities have introduced a tax on the export of raw medicinal cannabis ranging between 10% and 20%, which came into effect on 1 January 2021.

ESG and carbon tax 

Key strides have also been made within the Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) space. “ESG leadership, strategising and reporting is essential now for organisations that wish to flourish and remain relevant,” Kabochi says. He adds that companies need to consider how ESG and tax intersect, since tax is a significant value driver when businesses need to deliver on their ESG goals.

In South Africa, a carbon tax regime, which is being implemented in three phases, has been adopted. The second phase was scheduled to start in January 2023, however phase one was extended by three years until 31 December 2025.

Until then, taxpayers will enjoy substantial tax-free allowances which reduce their carbon tax liability. At the beginning of 2022, the South African government increased the carbon tax rate to R144 (about US$9), which is expected to increase annually to enable South Africa to uphold its COP26 commitments.

With effect from 1 January 2023, carbon tax payers in South Africa will also be required to submit carbon budgets and adhere to the provisions of the carbon budgeting system which will be governed by the Climate Change Bill. Where set carbon budgets are exceeded, the government plans to impose penalties. “At PwC, we are continuously focused on our renewed global strategy, ” The New Equation,” Kabochi says. “Through this strategy, a key focus area for PwC Africa is to support clients in adding value to their ESG ambitions and building trust through sustained outcomes.”

The New Equation is also an acknowledgement of the fundamental changes in the business environment in which PwC’s clients and other stakeholders operate. PwC continues to reinvent and adapt to these changes as a community of problem solvers, combining knowledge and human-led technology to deliver quality services and value.

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Economists project lower economic growth for Botswana

18th May 2022
CBD

Local and international economists have lowered their projections on Botswana’s economic growth for 2022 and 2023, saying the country is highly likely to fail to maintain high growth rate recorded in 2021 hence will not reach initial forecasts.

Economists this week lowered 2022 forecasts for Botswana’s economic growth rate, from the initial 5.3% to 4.8% and added that in 2023 growth could further decline to 4.0%. The lower projections come on the backdrop of an annual economic growth that recovered sharply in 2021 with figures showing that year-on-year real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) growth increased to 11.4%, up from a contraction of 8.7% in 2020.

Economists from the local research entity, E-consult, this week stated that the 2021 double digit growth that exceeded projections made at the time of the 2022 budget may be short lived due to other developments taking place in the global economy. E-consult Economist Sethunya Kegakgametse stated that the war in Ukraine has worsened supply problems in the global economy and added that before the war, macroeconomic indicators were seen as improving and returning to pre-COVID levels.

According to the economist the global economy was projected to improve in 2022 and 2023. Recent figures show that global growth projections have been revised downwards from the initial forecast of 4.9% in 2022 with the World Bank’s new estimate for global growth in 2022 at 3.2%.

The statistics also shows that International Monetary Fund revised their growth projections for 2022 and 2023 down by 0.8% and 0.2% respectively, falling to 3.6% for both years. “The outbreak of war has severely dampened the global recovery that was under way following the COVID-19 pandemic,” said the economist.

She stated that despite Botswana being geographically removed from the conflict, the country has not and will not be exempt from the disruptions in the global economy. “The disruptions to global supply chains resulting from the war will have a negative effect on both Botswana’s growth and trade activities.

The economic sanctions against diamonds from Russia will add uncertainty to the market which will have knock on effects to Botswana’s growth, exports, and government revenues,” said the economists who added that the disruptions are driving prices up and result with very high inflation in the local economy.

Kegakgametse projected that in an attempt to limit inflation Bank of Botswana will be forced to raise interest rate “Should the sharp increase in both global and local inflation persist, Bank of Botswana much like other central banks around the world will be forced to raise interest rates in a bid to control rising prices. This would mean an end to the expansionary monetary policy stance that had been adopted post COVID-19 to aid economic growth,” she said.

In the latest projections, the UK based economic research entity Fitch Solutions lowered 2022 real GDP growth forecast for Botswana from 5.3% to 4.8% “In 2023, we see economic growth rate decelerating to 4.0%,” said Fitch Solutions economists who also noted that the 2022 and 2023 economic growth projections may come out lower than the current forecasts, as it is possible that new vaccine-resistant virus variants may be identified, which could result in the re-implementation of restrictions. “In such circumstances, we cannot rule out that Botswana’s economy may post weaker growth than our baseline scenario currently assumes,” said the economists.

According to the projections, Fitch Solution stated that there is limited scope for Botswana government to increase diamond production and exports, following the economic sanctions imposed on Russian diamond mining companies operating in Botswana. The research entity added that De Beers is unlikely to scale up diamond output from Botswana in order to prop up diamond prices.

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