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Botswana Children’s Hospital first of its kind

Houston, Texas (USA): Unlike dust-blown cities of sub-Saharan Africa, the city of Houston in Texas pumps its blood throughout every vein in and around the medical centre, a 2.1 mile or 5.4 kilometre area strewn with skylines of hospitals, research labs, and health professional schools – it ought to have been named the medical hub.

The men in suits, mostly dark, picked pace and in their strides on the concrete floor was the immeasurable power and authority. The doors flung wide open as they sauntered into a hospital full of children sick with all types of cancer, including that which is malignant as leukaemia (blood cancer). The heavy security escort was about President of Botswana, Mokgweetsi Eric Masisi.

Apart from being told it was a cancer clinic, the beaming faces of these children tell a story totally different from what we are accustomed to in sub-Saharan Africa when patients suffer from debilitating diseases like cancer. Emaciated faces of despair, skin discolouration and skeletal bodies breathing their last are all too common, especially where AIDS and cancer have conspired to set the sun down on Africa’s populations.

The Texas Children’s Hospital has the highest treatment success rate of cancer in the world. In the United States for example, 75 percent of children who are sick from cancer make full recovery, while across sub-Saharan Africa, in every 100, 000 cancer-related illnesses, nearly 90 percent of them succumb.

Research has shown traceable evidence that poor medical facilities to deal with the treatment of the disease that requires expensive state-of-the art equipment, world-class facilities including laboratories for research, as well as the inadequacy of those in the medical field to perform surgical procedures on those suffering from the debilitating conditions, all too often, conspire against the single fighting spirit of the cancer patients in Africa.

In fact, the nation’s best in specialized health care are at Texas Children’s Hospital, for example; Dr Mark Kline – rated the best HIV specialist doctor in the United States and Dr David Poplack, also celebrated as one of top-notch American oncologists. It is worth their mention because these two powerhouses are directly involved in the project that is to be known as the paediatric cancer clinic on the grounds of the University of Botswana, thanks to the gifted donation of $50 million presented by the hand of John Damonti – President of the Brystol-Myers Squibb Foundation, an American pharmaceutical company.

The Foundation is preoccupied with the vision to alleviate pain and suffering brought about by ailments with devastating effects such as AIDS, cancer, diabetes and hepatitis B and C among common diseases in Botswana. They accomplish their objective by capacitating of healthcare workers, integrating medical care and community-based support services as well as mobilizing the communities in the fight against these prevalent diseases.

Over the 15 years since his maiden foray into Botswana’s complex HIV quagmire, Dr Kline saw the set up of the children’s clinic from a mere ward at Princess Marina Hospital named “Bana” to the transformative facility that is today known as “Baylor Children’s Clinic of Excellence”.

Cancer has ramped up in the recent years and has been attributed to the distressing effects of HIV especially among the sexually active populations, where young men present at health centres with skin cancer (Kaposi Sarcoma), while cervical cancer is too common among the young females. The relationship that has existed between Botswana and Texas University has now been taken a notch higher to include cancer with a focus on safeguarding children and securing the future of Botswana.

“This facility will be the best there is in sub-Saharan Africa and a model to emulate by others. Not only will we channel resources to construct state-of-the-art facility, but we commit to making sure that the best in healthcare are sent there to prepare the ground for what will become laser sharp cancer treatment, while strengthening the capacity of your medical officers. We will then pull out and let you run with it,” roared President and CEO of the Texas Children’s Hospital, Mark Wallace who received a standing ovation.

In the words of the Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Health and Wellness, Dr Morris Sinvula, the partnership is a huge investment for Botswana that must be harnessed especially the facilities belongs to her after they have imparted the much-needed expertise to save children’s lives.

 “We should embrace this and run with it as quickly as we can. With their help, we did well in managing HIV and we can tap on their expertise and use their model to manage non-communicable diseases,” stated Sinvula on the sidelines of the reception held in honour of President Masisi.

Dr Kline lauded Botswana as the best model throughout the seven countries where they are present in sub-Saharan Africa because of its exceptional political will expressed at the highest level of government, although rising HIV incidences among the adolescents threaten to reverse the gains thus far made. It is this commitment that Dr Kline is excited to work alongside his colleague; Dr Poplack to significantly bring down the mortality rates among children suffering from cancer.

In response, Masisi said over the recent 74 months – Botswana registered 12, 000 cases of cancer (translating to 162 cases every month) – patients who were referred for specialty care at world-class health facilities, mostly in South Africa at a burdensome cost to the taxpayers.

“I stand here tonight to express deep gratitude on behalf of the nation of Botswana to the continued support we receive from the Texas Children’s Hospital. This is a new front. The mandate has been expanded to include cancer, which is quite prevalent these days in our society, and arguably linked to the HIV incidences. But any country that cares about its posterity does not leave its children behind.

It is because of this reason that my presidency would not be complete if I did not make a visit to this incomparable institution, if I may borrow Mr Wallace’s descriptive qualifier. I can assure you that it will not be my last visit. In 2016, I was there when the cheque donation of $50 million was presented at the site where this new facility will be put up. I was there as the vice president. I was there at the groundbreaking ceremony.

And I am here tonight as the president of the country and making a bold commitment that we have made the resolve as a country to set up a subvention fund every year towards the construction of this facility in addition to the generous contributions from the Brystol-Myers Squibb Foundation. I further commit my government to effectively use your investments for the intended purpose.

I make an appeal not only to the businesses in the health sector, but all others who may see it worthy to partner with Botswana to rid us of the scourge of cancer, especially among children. I assure you that we are a country that prides itself on the rule of law and that means respecting ourselves first, and also respecting those outside our borders. It has meant setting up our immigration protocols to treat those visiting our country or considering us as an investment destination with respect that human beings deserve. You have my word as the country’s president,” he stated amidst cheers.

When responding to Michelle D. Garvin’s question during a roundtable discussion this week, Masisi said while the HIV treatment is second to none in Africa, there is constant drain on the economy and in the ultimate; it would not be sustainable to keep every patient on drugs indefinitely.

“Prevention of new infections is the only solution. It will reduce the cost to government. I need to be advised properly as to the timeliness for my proposed motion before Parliament to criminalise inter-generational sex because the patterns show our young people are getting infected from those with longer sexual experience. I just don’t know if bringing it up now before the elections next year will be ideal. But something like this ought to happen,” he chuckled.

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Details emerge in suspected Batswana poachers in Namibia

28th June 2022
suspected Motswana poacher arrested

New details about a suspected Motswana poacher arrested in Namibian and his accomplice who is on the run were revealed when the suspect appeared in court this week.

The Motswana Citizen who was shot and wounded by Namibia’s anti poaching unit is facing criminal charges under criminal case number (CR NO 10/06/2022) which was registered at the Divundu Police Station in the Mukwe constituency of the Kavango East Region on 10 June 2022.

It is alleged that a patrol team laid an ambush after discovering a giraffe’s fresh carcass in a snare wire and hanging biltong.  According to the Charge Sheet, the suspect Djeke Dihutu, aged 40 years, is charged with contravening and transgressions of Nature Conservation Ordinance andcontravening Immigration Act 07 in Mahango Wildlife Core Area, Bwabwata National Park. Dihutu’s first court appearance was on the 17th of June 2022, Rundu and it was postponed to the 07 July 2022. He is currently hospitalized in hospital under Police Guards.

Commenting on this latest development, the Namibian Lives Matter Movement National Chairperson Sinvula Mudabeti applauded the Namibian Anti Poaching Unit for its compliance with what it called the universal instrument on the Code of Conduct for Law Enforcement Officials adopted by the United Nations General Assembly resolution 34/169.

“We are aware that the duties of the police carry a great deal of risk, but our police has shown that they have a moral calling and obligation to protect even foreigners suspected of serious crimes on Namibian soil,” said Mudabeti.

According to him, whereas the Botswana Police Service, the Botswana Defence Force (BDF) and Directorate of Intelligence Service (DIS) have “very low moral ethics, integrity, accountability and honesty, the Namibian security agencies has shown very high levels of ethical leadership in the discharge of their duties even under duress.”

He said Namibian’s anti poaching unit has exercised one very important value, that is, the use of force only when it is reasonable and necessary. Mudabeti said this is in harmony with international best practices as enshrined in Article 2 of the UN instrument on law enforcement conduct, “In the performance of their duty, law enforcement officials shall respect and protect human dignity and maintain and uphold the human rights of all persons.

Our police have protected the life of a Botswana poacher and accorded him dignity, which is very foreign to our Botswana counterparts,” he said. He said article 3 of the same instrument above, calls for Law enforcement officials to use force only when strictly necessary and to the extent required for the performance of their duty.

“This provision emphasizes that the use of force by law enforcement officials should be exceptional; while it implies that law enforcement officials may be authorized to use force as is reasonably necessary under the circumstances for the prevention of crime or in effecting or assisting in the lawful arrest of suspected offenders, no force going beyond that was used by our Police,” he said.

Furthermore, Mudabeti said, whereas the universally accepted norm of the law of proportionality ordinarily permits the use of force by law enforcement, it is to be understood that such principles of proportionality in no case should be interpreted to authorize the use of force which is disproportionate to the legitimate objective to be achieved.

“Our police have used force proportional to the situation at hand. Great work indeed! Article 6 urges law enforcement officials to ensure the full protection of the health of persons in their custody and, in particular, shall take immediate action to secure medical attention whenever required,” he said.

Mudabeti said the Botswana poacher was immediately taken to hospital whereas the Nchindo brothers who were captured on Namibian soil, beaten, tortured and executed while pleading to be taken to the hospital we left to die.

“The Namibian Doctor gave evidence in court that Sinvula Munyeme’s lungs showed signs of life (during the autopsy) and that he could have survived if he was accorded immediate medical assistance in time but was left to die while BDF soldiers looked and possibly ignored his cry for help,” he said.

Mudabeti said unlike in Botswana where there are no clear separation of powers between the BDF, Botswana Police Service, Department of Intelligence and their Directorate of Public Prosecutions,” we have a system that allows for checks and balances and allows our people and foreigners who are found on the wrong side of the law to be accorded the right to a fair trial.”

He said Botswana citizens are treated with dignity when apprehended in Namibia and not assaulted, tortured and executed. “We are a civilized country that respects international law in dealing with non-Namibian criminals. The Namibian Police have not mistreated the Botswana poacher but have given him the benefit of the doubt by allowing due processes of the law to be followed,” he said.

He added that, “We are a peace loving nation that has not repaid Botswana by the evil that Botswana has done to Namibia by killing more than 37 innocent and unarmed Namibians by the trigger happy BDF.” He concluded that, “Our acts of mercy in arresting Botswana citizens should never be mistaken for cowardice.”

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Gov’t, Unions clash over accommodation

28th June 2022
accomodation

The government has reportedly taken a decision to terminate provision of pool housing and subsidy for civil servants as it attempts to trim the public service wage bill.

This emerges in a dispute that is currently before the Labour Office headquarters lodged by unions representing thousands of civil servants across the country. This publication understands that the decision to cease providing pool housing and rental subsidy for public officers is part of proposals that government put on the table during its negotiations with public service unions in order for it to adjust salaries.

A letter from Labour Office addressed to the Directorate of Public Service Management (DPSM) shows that the directorate is cited as the First Respondent. The letter is titled, “Dispute lodged: Cessation of provision of pool housing and subsidy for pubic officers.”

“This serves as a notification and requirement to a mediation hearing,” the letter informed DPSM. According to the letter, the Botswana Teachers Union (BTU), Botswana Sectors of Educators Trade Unions (BOSETU) Botswana Nurses Union (BONU) and Botswana Land Board &Local Authorities &Health workers Union (BLLAHW) who lodged the complaint are cited as the Applicant.

“Please come for mediation hearing. The hearing will be conducted by Mr Lebang. The hearing is scheduled for date/time 29th June 2022, 09: 00HOURS at Block 8 District Labour Office, Gaborone. Please bring all relevant documents,” reads the letter in part.

According to a document described as a proposal paper on the negotiations on salaries and other conditions of employment of public officers by the employer (government), the government did not only propose to stop providing accommodation to civil servants but also put a number of proposals on the table.

The proposal papers states that the negotiations (which have since been concluded) cover three government financial years; 2022/23, 2023/24 and 2024/25. The government proposed an across the board salary adjustments as follows; 3% for the financial year 2022/23 effective 1st April 2022, across the board salary adjustment of 3.5% for the financial year 2023/24 effective 1st April 2023 subject to performance of the economy and across the board salary adjustment of 4% for the financial year 2024/25 effective 1st April 2024 subject to performance of the economy.

The government also proposed phasing out of retention and attractive (Scarce Skills) Allowance with a view to migration towards clean pay, renegotiate and set new timelines for all outstanding issues contained in the Collective Labour Agreement, executed by the employer and trade unions on the 27th August 2019, to ensure proper sequencing, alignment and proper implementation.
The government also proposed to freeze public service recruitment for the 2022/23 financial year and withdraw the financial equivalence of P500 million attached to vacancies from Ministries, Department and Agencies (MDAs).

Another proposal included phasing out of commuted overtime allowance and payment of overtime in accordance with the law and review human resource policies during the financial year 2022/23, 2023/24 and 2024/25.

The government argued that its proposals were premised on affordability and sustainability adding that it was important to underscore that the review of salaries and conditions of service for public officers was taking place at a time when there were uncertainties both in the global and domestic economies.

“Furthermore there is need to ensure that any collective labour agreement that is concluded does not breach the fiscal deficit target of 4% of GDP,” the proposal paper stated. The proposal paper further indicated that beyond salary adjustments, the Government of Botswana is of the view that a more comprehensive consideration “must be taken on the issue of remuneration in the public service by embracing principles such as total rewards compensation which involves taking a fully comprehensive and holistic approach to how our organization compensates employees for the work.”

The proposal paper also noted that, “Clearly, the increase in salaries and changes to other conditions of service which have monetary consequences will further increase the proportion of the budget taken by salaries, allowances and other monetary based conditions of services.”

“The consequential effect would be a reduction of the portion that can be used for other recurrent budget needs (e.g. maintenance of assets, consumable supplies such as medicines and books) and for development projects,” the proposal states.

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BPF NEC probes Serowe squabbles

28th June 2022
BPF

Opposition Botswana Patriotic Front (BPF) National Executive Committee will in no time investigate charges party members worked with the ruling Botswana Democratic Party (BDP) membership to tip the scales in favour of the latter for Serowe Sub-council Chairmanship in exchange for deputy seat in a dramatic 11th hour gentleman’s deal, leaving the ruling party splinter under the political microscope.

In a spectacular Sub-council election membership last Thursday, the ruling BDP’s Lesedi Phuthego beat Atamelang Thaga with 14 votes to 12 for Serowe Sub-council Chairmanship coveted seat and subsequently the ruling party’s councilor Bernard Kenosi withdrew his candidacy in the final hour for the equally admired deputy chair paving the way for Solomon Dikgang of BPF, seen as long sealed ‘I scratch your back and you scratch mine’ gentleman’s agreement between the contenders.

Both parties entered the race with a tie of votes torn between 12 councillors each, translating for election race that will go down to the wire definitely. But that will not be the case as two BPF councilors shifted their allegiance to the ruling party during the first race for Chairmanship held in a secret ballot and no sooner was the election concluded then the ruling party answered back by withdrawing its candidacy for the deputy chair position to give BPF’s Dikgang the post on a silver platter unopposed.

BPF councilor Vuyo Notha confirmed the incident in an interview on Wednesday, insisting the party NEC was determined to “investigate the matter soon”. “During the race for the Chairmanship, two more BPF voted for alongside the ruling party membership. It was clear Dikgang voted alongside the BDP as immediately after the vote for Chairmanship was concluded, Kenosi withdraw his candidacy to render Dikgang unopposed as a payback,” Notha added.

As for the other vote, Makolo ward councilor will not be drawn for the identity preferring instead to say: “BPF NEC will convene all the councilors to investigate the matter soon and we will take from there.” Notha will also not be drawn to conclude may be the culprit councilors could have defected to the ruling party silently.

“If they are no longer part of us they should say so and a by-election be called,” was all he could say. As it stands now, the law forbids sitting Councilors and Parliamentarians from crossing the floor to another party as to do so will immediately invite for a new election as dictated by the law. Incumbent politicians will therefore dare not venture for the unknown with a by-election that could definitely cost their political life and certainly their full benefits.

Notha could also not be dragged to link the culprit councilors actions to BPF Serowe region Chairperson Tebo Thokweng who has silently defected to the ruling party and currently employed by the party businessman and former candidate for Serowe West Moemedi Dijeng as PRO for the highly anticipated cattle abattoir project in Serowe.

“As for Thokweng he has not resigned from the party but from the region’s chairmanship,” he said. WeekendPost investigations suggest Thokweng is the secret snipper behind the recruitment drive of the votes for the elections and is determined to tear the party dominance in Serowe and the neighbouring villages asunder including in Palapye going forward.

This publication’s investigations also show BPF’s Radisele and UDC’s Mokgware/Mogome councilors are under the radar of investigations for the votes-themselves associated with the workings and operations of Thokweng.

“NEC will definitely leave no stone unturned with their investigations to get into the bottom of the matter. Disciplinary actions will follow certainly,” Notha concluded, underscoring the need to toe the party line to set a good precedent. For the youthful councilor, the actions of his peers has set a wrong precedent which has to be dealt with seriously to deter future culprits.

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