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Fluor wins Khoemacau EPCM

Global engineering group Flour Corporation on Tuesday announced another major mining development contract in Botswana. Canyon Capital a company developing the Khoemacau Copper & Silver projects has awarded the American conceived giant Engineering  Procurement & Construction Management (EPCM)  services for it’s over P5 billion mining undertaking aimed at  unearthing the base metals for the next 21 years.

Fluor booked the undisclosed contract value in the second quarter of 2019.According to the New York Stock Exchange Listed multinational engineering outfit the contract follows a successfully working relationship after they worked with Canyon Capital on the first phase of preliminary and cost determinacy designs.

“We worked closely with Cupric Canyon in the project’s front-end engineering and design phase to establish a capital-efficient design and execution plan for the project,” said Tony Morgan President of Fluor’s Mining & Metals Business in a statement released from Irving Texas United States on Tuesday.

Fluor was also involved in construction management of the early works for the camp upgrade, bush clearing, transport corridor and surface infrastructure terrace preparation. In this next phase of intense mining infrastructure designs and reconfigurations Fluor’s scope entails upgrading the existing copper concentrator plant and new mine surface infrastructure.

The project is expected to produce an annual average of 62,000 metric tons of copper and 1.9 million ounces of silver with a life of mine in excess of 20 years. “We will leverage our local capabilities and extensive copper experience to execute the Khoemacau project with excellence, safely, on time, on budget and with quality,” added Morgan.

Engineering, Procurement, & Construction Management (EPCM) Contracts arrangement are common set ups used in mega industrial projects where a significant number of trade contactors are involved. On an EPCM contract the client employs the necessary trade contractors to construct the works. The EPCM 'contractor' designs the project, and then acts as a construction manager, coordinating the procurement process and then managing the trade contractors.

Effectively they are performing the role of a consultant during the construction phase. An EPCM contractor is not directly involved in the building and construction of the project, but is rather responsible for the detailed design and overall management of the project, on behalf of the owner or principal.

The EPCM contractor is mandated with ensuring that the engineering and design of the project is in compliance with the projects technical and functional specifications. Supervising, management and coordinating construction interface in accordance with a detailed schedule is the key responsibility of the EPCM contractor. When a need arises during the tenure of the project the EPCM contractor takes full responsibility of   establishing contractual arrangements on behalf of the owner with other contractors, vendors, sub-contractors and sub-vendors, through a tender process.

Flour Corporation raking 164 on the Global fortune 500 company’s scale, at an annual revenue of around $20billion established an office in Botswana in 2015 and has managed and delivered one of the country’s major projects. In September 2012 the company completed Jwaneng Mine expansion works, an over P3.5 billion project that delivered Cut 8. The Jwaneng Cut 8 was an over P24 billion mining investment that boosted mine’s lifespan from 2017 to 2024. Debswana has since commenced Cut 9, an over P15 billion project that will take Jwaneng to 2034.

During expansion into Cut 8 Fluor performed engineering, procurement, and construction management services for associated relocation and rebuilding of the mine surface infrastructure and completed the project in September 2012.Cut 8  enabled  the removal of overburden to allow the mine to access 91 million tonnes of ore that will yielding 102 million carats of diamonds until and 2024 .The P24 billion  Cut 8 project was and still remains  the largest ever single capital commitment in Botswana’s private sector.

The Khoemacau Copper & Silver Project is located in the North East of Botswana in the Ngamiland district, the project encompasses Kalahari Copper belt and the Bosetu Resource, the latter was acquired from Australian  Based Discovery Metal after insolvency in 2013.Early this year by Cupric Canyon Capital announced the successful signing of US$565 million (around P 5.9 billion) capital injection, as funding package to commence development of the Khoemacau project to unearth high grade copper and silver concentrate.

The US$565 million of funding comprised  a US$275 million (P2.9 billion) senior debt facility from Red Kite Mine Finance and a US$265 million (P2.8 billion) silver stream from Royal Gold AG a wholly owned subsidiary of Royal Gold, and a US$25 million (P263 million) subordinated debt facility also from Royal Gold.

During funding announcement Chief Executive Officer of Cupric Canyon Capital Johan Ferreira explained that the deal was expected to be closed in the 2nd quarter of 2019 opening giving way for second phase of construction which is expected to run for two years pushing the Starter Project to produce first sellable concentrate beginning in the first half of 2021, with subsequent ramp-up.

Flour‘s EPCM contract is also noted to included overseeing the upgrade of existing Expansion Project pre-feasibility study to a definitive feasibility study.

The Expansion Project includes the construction of a new 5.8 million tonnes per annum processing facility near Zone 5 which will produce approximately 100,000 tonnes of copper per annum. Founded in 1912, Flour Corporation is a global engineering, procurement, fabrication, construction and maintenance company that transforms the world by building prosperity and empowering progress. Fluor serves its clients by designing, building and maintaining safe, well executed, capital-efficient projects around the world. With headquarters in Irving, Texas, Fluor ranks 164 on the Fortune 500 list with revenue of $19.2 billion in 2018 and has more than 53,000 employees worldwide.

Head of Mining Base Metal Business at Flour Torny Morgan says his company has worked in Botswana since the early 2000s and opened an office in Gaborone in 2015. “From Gaborone, we deliver safety, cost-competitive innovations and execution excellence to clients. Fluor conducts business in a socially, economically and environmentally responsible manner, and the Botswana office provides local employment opportunities and supplier and skills development.” He said.

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Strong demand for diamonds anchors Botswana back into trade surplus 

24th May 2022
diamonds
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Robust demand for diamonds in early 2022 which was a spillover from late 2021, has catapulted Botswana into a surplus for the month of January 2022. 

According to latest figures from Statistics Botswana, the country recorded a trade surplus of P661.8 million in the first month of the year, against a trade deficit of P270.2 million in December as per revised data.

The Statistics Botswana’s International Trade Merchandise Trade Statistics (ITMS) for January has attributed the trade surplus to a splendid performance of the diamond commodity which anchored the country’s export figures to a growth of 5.7 percent (P411.8 million), from the revised December 2021 figure of P7,182.8 million to P7, 594.6 million in January.

The Diamonds group accounted for 90.9 percent (P6, 904.3 million), followed by Copper, with 2.5 percent (P189.0 million). Diamond exports rose by 5.2 percent (P339.2 million) from the revised December 2021 value of P6, 565.1 million to P6, 904.3 million. An upsurge in Copper exports by 17.2 percent (P27.8 million) from P161.3 million to P189.0 million was also observed during the current month.

On the other hand during the same month of January 2022, imports were valued at P6, 932.8 million, representing a decline of 7.0 percent (P520.3 million) from the December
2021 revised figure of P7, 453.1 million. The decrease was mainly attributed to the decline in all commodity groups except for Diamonds and Chemicals & Rubber Product.

Botswana imports diamonds from South Africa, Namibia and Canada, coming into the country for aggregation at De Beers Global Sightholder Sales. Diamonds contributed 30.1 percent (P2, 087.1 million) to total imports. Fuel; Chemicals & Rubber Products and Food, Beverages & Tobacco followed with contributions of 15.7 percent (P1, 085.8 million), 14.9 percent (P1, 031.2 million) and 12.5 percent (P869.0 million) respectively. Machinery & Electrical Equipment contributed 10.3 percent (P716.0 million).

During the month SACU region accounted for the largest imports contributing 53.2 percent (P3, 690.3 million) to the total. The top most imported commodity groups from the customs union were Fuel and Food, Beverages & Tobacco, with contributions of 26.4 percent (P973.1million) and 22.1 percent (P815.8 million) to imports from the region, respectively.

South Africa is Botswana’s top supplier of imports at 50.3 percent (P3, 490.3 million) of total imports during the current month. Fuel and Food, Beverages & Tobacco contributed 24.5 percent (P855.5million), and 23.0 percent (P801.1 million) to total imports from that country, respectively. Chemicals & Rubber Products and Machinery & Electrical Equipment, followed by 13.5 percent (P471.3 million) and 13.1 percent (P458.8 million) respectively.

Namibia supplied 2.3 percent (P157.1 million) of total imports during the period, mainly comprising of fuel at 74.9 percent of total imports from the country. Botswana received imports worth P1, 738.2 million from the EU, accounting for 25.1 percent of total imports during the reference period.

The major commodity group imported from the EU was Diamonds, at 80.8 percent (P1, 404.9 million) of all imports from the union. Belgium was the major source of imports from the EU, with a contribution of 21.7 percent (P1, 506.9 million) of total imports during the month under review.

In January 2022, imports from Asia were valued at P657.6 million, representing 9.5 percent of total imports. The major commodity groups imported from the regional block were Diamonds and Machinery & Electrical Equipment with contributions of 41.5 percent (P272.7 million) and 21.6 percent (P141.8 million) of total imports respectively.

Canada supplied 4.2 percent (P290.5 million) of total imports during the current period. Imports from Canada consisted mainly of Diamonds at 98.5 percent (P286.0 million). In terms of Exports Asia was the top destination for Botswana exports, having received 67.7 percent (P5, 141.9 million) of total exports in January 2022.

These exports were mainly destined for India and the UAE, receiving 25.6 percent (P1, 944.0 million) and 23.1 percent (P1, 753.1 million) of total exports, respectively. Diamonds and Copper were the major commodity groups exported to Asia during the month.

In January 2022, exports destined to the EU amounted to P1, 297.4 million, accounting for 17.1 percent of total exports. Belgium received almost all the exports destined to the regional union, acquiring 16.9 percent (P1, 280.5 million) of total exports.

The Diamonds group was the main commodity group exported to the EU, at 98.6 percent (P1, 279.9 million)

During the reference period, the SACU region received exports valued at P900.6 million, accounting for 11.9 percent of total exports. Diamonds and Live Cattle accounted for 55.0 percent (P322.5 million) and 10.1 percent (P76.8 million) of total exports to the customs union.

South Africa and Namibia received 9.6 percent (P727.4 million) and 2.3 percent (P172.8 million) of total exports respectively during the month under review. Goods exported by Air during the month under review were valued at P6, 990.3 million, accounting for 92.0 percent of total exports. Those transported by Road and Rail accounted for 7.8 percent (P589.3 million) and 0.2 percent (P14.9 million) respectively.

During January 2022, 52.3 percent (P3, 625.3 million) of total imports were transported into the country by Road. Transportation of imports by Rail and Air accounted for 35.4 percent (P2, 456.5 million) and 12.3 percent (P850.4 million) respectively.

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Coal shortage in Europe: Minergy CEO speaks

24th May 2022
Coal-shortage

1. Europe once branded coal ‘dirty’ but their demand for it has skyrocketed once again. What do we learn about coal from what’s happening now in Ukraine?

There are over 80 countries in the world who still rely on coal as a form of energy. These are countries that are fighting to have basic necessities like electricity, which research shows increases their quality of life substantially. Energy poverty is real in Africa, India and Asia.

The Western approach to coal cannot be universal. We must remember that developed economies relied heavily on coal during their development. Challenges being faced by developing nations are unique. Demand for coal in Europe right now is driven by sanctions on Russian gas and coal and show that Europe might well be over-exposed to “green” with no back-up at times when there is no wind, running water, endless sunshine or faced with supply shortages. Coal is back in play in Europe because of the war, and despite massive adoption of clean energy in the US not all of the US uses clean energy.

In Germany and Italy, coal-fired power plants that were once decommissioned are now being considered for a second life. In South Africa, more coal-laden ships are embarking on what’s typically a quiet route around the Cape of Good Hope toward Europe. Coal burning in the US is in the midst of its biggest revival in a decade, while China is reopening shuttered mines and planning new ones
Coal remains and will remain an essential element in the energy mix. We need to make use of cleaner coal in such mix.

2. How much has been the projected demand of coal in the in the last couple of months?

Our key land export markets consist of 80-90% bound for South Africa and Namibia. In the last three months however, sea bound exports increased significantly with international traders buying to export to Europe and the West. We do not have specific numbers because the final destination overseas is determined by the international traders who buy coal from us. We remain hopeful that this demand continues.

3. How has the demand influenced Minergy exports to South Africa, Namibia and overseas?

Minergy remains committed to its local markets and continues to supply into these. A massive increase in demand from international markets, stemming from the Ukraine war and sanctions on Russia has come as a blessing to Minergy as lucrative pricing has made once uneconomical logistics feasible. This allowed Minergy to place additional product in new markets, markets historically uneconomical… We continue to look for alternative markets and supply to Namibia is one such market as well as the ability to use their ports as export routes for seaborne thermal coal.

4. Comment on the Minergy market access dynamics.

Refer to answer for question 2 and 3.

5. What would it take to fully explore the billions of tons of coal in Botswana?

Greater local and even foreign direct investment. Simplifying regulatory processes and promoting ease of doing business needs to be top agenda items. Coal has unfairly been de-campaigned in the West as a ‘dirty’ mineral which has swayed investors to look elsewhere for investment portfolios. With enough funders and investments in coal the huge deposits can change our power fortunes and energy independence. Given Botswana’s massive reserves, we are of the opinion that coal should be another diversified revenue stream for the Botswana Government. At Minergy we remain thankful for the support from Government as well as from internal development organizations that have supported our strategy and were instrumental in getting the mine to the phase that it is in at the moment. Partnership with government and open minds to managing coal is key.

6. What future do you project for Minergy in the medium and long term given what we see now in Europe?

We cannot predict how long the situation in Europe will last and we pray that it will be resolved as the loss of lives and destruction of the Ukraine is a human catastrophe. Our model is premised on fully optimizing our deposits for the benefit of Botswana and Batswana..

7. Open cast for coal is a new concept in Botswana. How has Minergy enhanced the skills base?

Opencast coal mining and the associated beneficiation of sized coal is a specialized industry. Currently there is no other similar operation in Botswana to recruit from.

The South African coal industry is well experienced with this plant operation and the requisite skill is found there. It is necessary for our operations to make use of such skills to operate the plant as we cannot find all the skill in Botswana. The skill for operating such a plant is different than diamond, tin, copper etc. processing. As such certain positions require expatriate recruitment, but all these positions are supported with understudy programmes

It is Minergy’s hope as part of its legacy, to promote and install fully qualified local opencast mining and coal beneficiation skills, currently not available in Botswana.

8. What are the projected human capital skills of the future in coal mining.

See response to question number 7.

9. Share experiences from the recent Mining Indaba. What is the future of coal?

Africa needs to be energy efficient and independent. We remain encouraged at the responsible strategy that the Botswana government has put into place to support this.

10. Kindly share in detail, infrastructural developments which were brought in place by Minergy in those communities.

We have an electronic brochure that showcases all the value add that we have contributed not to just the Medie village but Botswana as a whole. This is available at our office or electronically on our website www.minergycoal.com. Highlights include

Minergy paid for the electrification of the mine and the local Medie village benefited from the connection, allowing 500 people access to electricity through a self-funded prepaid system. As an extended part of Minergy’s social investment drive the Kgotla and the clinic have also been electrified, making day-to-day running of these essential services much easier and efficient. This is ahead of the Governments intended electrification programme, which was only planned for2024.

The quality of the road between Lentsweletau and Medie has been significantly upgraded compared to the state the road was in before mining operations commenced. Continuous road rehabilitation and dust suppression is undertaken in and around the villages to maintain road integrity. ( This is a public road, but the Group takes care of the road as it benefits the community in which the mine operates)

The dilapidated community hall has been refurbished including access to solar power and will be handed over to the community.

11. A development as huge as Masama Coal mine would usually result in the mushrooming of several other businesses to benefit from its value chain. In the case of Masama, kindly share businesses which have been created as a result of the growing value chain.

Readers are again referred to electronic brochure that showcases all the value add that we have contributed.

This phenomenon is indeed correct and there are a number of entrepreneurial businesses that have flourished including laundry services, bed & breakfast for suppliers visiting the mine or the area, housing built for rental accommodation, spaza shops and food stalls, first supermarket in Lentsweletau and additional building supply outlets established

We also make use of 12 locally owned and operated transporters, who are used by the mine to transport product, where applicable.

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Debswana-Botswana Oil P8 billion fuel partnership to create 100 jobs

18th May 2022
Head-of-Stakeholder-Relations

The partnership between Debswana and Botswana Oil Limited (BOL) which was announced a fortnight ago will create under 100 direct jobs, and scores of job opportunities for citizens in the value chain activities.

In a major milestone, Debswana and BOL jointly announced that the fuel supply to Debswana, which was in the past serviced by foreign companies, will now be reserved for citizen companies. The total value of the project is P8 billion, spanning a period of five years.

“About 88 direct jobs will be created through the partnership. These include some jobs which will be transferred from the current supplier to the new partnership,” Matida Mmipi, Head of Stakeholder Relations at Botswana Oil, told BusinessPost.

“We believe this partnership will become a blueprint for other citizen initiatives, even in other sectors of the economy. Furthermore, this partnership has succeeded in unlocking opportunities that never existed for ordinary citizens who aspire to grow and do business with big companies like Debswana.”

Mmipi said through this partnership, BOL and Debswana intend to impact citizen owned companies in the fuel supply value chain that include transportation, supply, facilities maintenance, engineering, customs clearance, trucks stops and its support activities such as workshop / maintenance, tyre services, truck wash bays among others.

“The number of companies to be on-boarded will be determined by the economics at the time of engagement,” she said. BOL will play a facilitatory role of handholding and assisting emerging citizen-owned fuel supply and fuel transportation companies to supply Debswana’s Jwaneng and Orapa Letlhakane Damtshaa (OLDM) mines with diesel and petrol for their operations.

“BOL expects to increase citizen companies’ market share in the fuel supply and transportation industries, which have over the years been dominated by foreign-owned suppliers. Consequently, the agreement will also ensure security of supply for Debswana operations, which are a mainstay of the Botswana economy,” Mmipi said.

“Furthermore, BOL will, under this agreement, transfer skills to citizen suppliers and transporters during the contract period and ensure delivery of competent and skilled citizen suppliers and transport companies upon completion of the agreement.”

Mmipi said the capacitating by BOL is limited to providing citizen companies oil industry technical capability and capacity to deliver on the requirements of the contract, when asked on helping citizen companies to access funding.

“BOL’s mandate does not include financing citizen empowerment initiatives. Securing funding will remain the responsibility of the beneficiaries. This could be through government financing entities including CEDA or through commercial banks. Further to this, there are financial institutions that have already signed up to support the Debswana Citizen Economic Empowerment Programme (CEEP),” Mmipi indicated.

While BOL is established by government as company limited by guarantee, it will not benefit financially from the partnership with Debswana, as citizen empowerment in the petroleum value chain is core to BOL’s mandate.

“BOL does not pursue citizen facilitation for financial benefit, but rather we engage in citizen facilitation as a social aspect of our mandate. Citizen facilitation comes at a cost, but it is the right thing to do for the country to develop the oil and gas industry,” she said.

Mmipi said supplying fuel to Debswana comes with commercial benefits such as supply margins. These have traditionally been made outside the country when supply was done by multi-nationals for a period spanning over 50 years. With BOL anchoring supply for Debswana, this benefit will accrue locally, and BOL will be able to pay taxes and dividends to the shareholders in Botswana.

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