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BFA justifies Amrouches value

The news of Adel Amrouche’ stupendous salary should have never come at a time when the Senior National Team, The Zebras, endured a spirit-dumping elimination from the ongoing World Cup 2022 qualifiers against The Flames of Malawi.

Somewhere, around and far away from Lekidi Football Center, it   is quickly turning into a live trial for both the players and the coaching staff. Amrouche signed a two year deal with the Botswana Football Association (BFA), with a salary scale reaching a P 250 000 mark. The association’s representatives still distance themselves from Amrouche’ salary.  They are however steadfast in their insistency that “good things do not come cheap.’’

Amrouche, a gaffer appointed to overhaul and turn around the fortunes of the Botswana game within two years, has played back-to back games against Malawi and came out of the tie scathed. No goals, no win. However, increasingly—and predictably so—the team’s head coach is expected to become a living embodiment of the monumental task ahead. Malawi and world cup dreams have come and gone. Questions are now flying from everywhere trying to scrutinize the massive disparity between his priceless treatment and his lukewarm results. But it is too early.

With this in hand, many critics may feel further emboldened to ask for radical changes in high places of Botswana football. But while Amrouche’s job is obviously a thankless one, the association’s reaction amid the coach’s pay cheque is with surprising composure. Without dwelling much on his salary, BFA’s file and rank members say coaches are slowly becoming expensive to purchase. “There are no shorts cut to success, if we want positive results, we have to acquire tried and experienced coaches,” one member said.

It is indeed expensive. In Southern Africa and the whole continent, the confirmation that football has become mad with sky rocketing salaries still stand. Zambian football federation two weeks ago, announced that their Ministry of Sports has approved a salary scale of their head coach. The figure stands at P 250 000.  Julesic Vaseline, a Serbian born gaffer who was turned down by BFA, might get the job. Zambia, like Botswana, craves for AFCON qualification.

In 2016, as Zimbabwe traversed the redemption road, and paid their former coach Calisto Pasawa, a staggering P210 000 salary. This is according to Newsday sources in the country. The Warriors, as Zimbabwe is called, are of course the dominant force of the South African game and have appeared in the last two editions of AFCON finals. The side, together with Zambia has been pitted against Botswana to fight for the qualification ticket into AFCON 2021.

 Ricardo Mannetti of Namibia was earning 150 000 in Pulas and took his native country into the finals of the last AFCON edition. In South Africa, Steward Baxter, prior to his fall, was getting a monthly salary of 728 000 in Pulas. News24 confirmed his salary in 2018. Although he complained a lot that it is lower than what Pitso Mosimane was getting, he managed to take the country to the last edition of AFCON finals.

The Times Group, a publication in Malawi, reported that their most expensive coach was hired in June 2015 and was earning 320 000 in Pulas. In West and North African countries, the scales are high. It is not surprising that these parts of the continent are the kings and rulers of the African game. Ghana appointed Coach James Appiah, with a monthly salary of 300 000 in Pulas. They say it is one of the lowest in the region. How remarkable for a country that has won the African cup 4 times!

Egypt, the standing giants of the African game with 7 titles, paid Javier Aguirre a whopping 1 296 000 in Pulas. His monthly wages were increased after he took the nation to the world cup finals last year but only to be sacked after failing to win the AFCON title on home soil earlier this year. Cameroon, after winning the 2017 edition, also followed suit. They went for the signature of Clarance Seedorf, paying him 1 152 000. While some are sacked before delivering, what remains at the present moment is that “the tone is set” and Botswana is following suit.

Southern African Coaches and Salaries
South Africa- P 728 000
Zambia –       P 250 000
Namibia-       P 125 00
Zimbabwe- P210 000
Angola       P 325 000
Swaziland P 40 000
Malawi P 320 000

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Finally, sponsors jerk BFA

30th January 2023

With many being of the view that the state of football in Botswana has deteriorated significantly as it is no longer appealing to the business community, this was a good week for the football community. The Botswana Football Association (BFA) leadership under the stewardship of MacLean Letshwiti secured sponsorship for a combined value of P19. 3 million for the FA Cup competition and the First Division league – both South and North.

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Clubs petition Zackhem, Jagdish Shah

23rd January 2023

Some disgruntled Botswana Football League (BFL) shareholders are planning to petition the BFL board led by Gaborone United director and chief financier Nicolas Zackhem and his treasurer Jagdish Shah. Furthermore, they want to challenge the Botswana football Association (BFA) leadership over the deteriorating status of football in the country.

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P80 million windfall for BFA

9th January 2023

Botswana Football Association (BFA) is poised to benefit from FIFA’s forward development programme. The Association will receive over P80 million to be used during the course of the next four years, as the world football governing body is strengthens its commitment to building a stronger foundation and the growth of football.

The Forward 3.0 funds – to be accessed by all 54 CAF members for the next four years have seen an increase of USD 2 million compared to Forward 2.0 cycle and Forward 1.0 cycle when the programme was launched.

According to FIFA President Gianni Infantino, the third cycle of the programme will be launched this month and it will dedicate more financial resources than before to developing football nations as there is an overall increase of approximately 30% compared to Forward 2.0.

“It is vital that we are now strengthening our commitment to building a stronger foundation for the growth of football,” Infantino noted.

The 62 page report by FIFA-Forward-Development-Programme-Forward-3-0-regulations also reveals that for travel and equipment, each member association, subject to compliance with the regulations, will receive an additional USD 1 million to cover the cost of travel and accommodation for their national teams. It further states that the remaining funds may be used to cover the cost of travel and accommodation for domestic competitions organized by the member associations.

“A contribution of up to USD 200,000 for the four-year cycle (2023-2026) to cover the cost of any football equipment related to the training of players and organization of matches (e.g. full kits for the national teams, balls, mini goals, bibs, substitution boards and referees’ communication systems) for those member associations that are identified as needing the most assistance,” the report indicated.

FIFA President, Infantino and his team said the member association is identified as needing the most assistance, for the purpose of the contributions, where their annual revenues (excluding Forward Programme funds as well as funds from any other FIFA programme/ initiative) do not exceed USD 4 million as the figure shall be reflected in the latest annual statutory audit report submitted to the FIFA general secretariat within six months after the closing of the relevant financial year.

Nevertheless, the contributions for travel will be released in four equal installments of USD 250,000 each in January every year, whilst those for equipment will be released in four equal installments of USD 50,000 each in January every year provided that the member association has fulfilled the conditions.

For the specific projects – in the case of Botswana and Namibia – there is an ambition to host the AFCON 2027 and if the joint bid succeed, the two nations will need to build new stadium to meet the requirements of CAF as the Bid technical committee has alluded before; therefore the two associations could make an appeal for extra funds to FIFA.

The report further says where a member association uses funds allocated for specific projects to improve or build new football infrastructure for its direct benefit or for the benefit of another entity (e.g. regional associations or clubs), the member association shall also provide, as part of the supporting documents, the FIFA general secretariat with the relevant national land registry certificate or extract confirming that the member association or the other entity is the owner of the land or the agreements confirming the donation, transfer or other form of provision to, or use of land by the association.

When contacted for comment, local sports analyst, Jimmy George said; “Ours is more a lack of vision, than money to finance programs. Regrettably when you lack vision not even USD 8 million can bail you out. Its pity the funds might be used to pay for the past projects that have yielded very little success.”

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