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Why MPs choked P1billion transfer

Minister of Finance and Economic Development, Dr Thapelo Matsheka was on Thursday this week forced to withdraw a request to have P1.1 billion appropriated from the Development Budget to fund shortfalls in Government’s re-current budget owing to unbudgeted increment of public service salaries.

The withdrawal followed a fierce resistance from opposition benches, with the Umbrella for Democratic Change (UDC) threatening to take the matter to court for interdiction. The UDC collectively believed that appropriating money from the development fund to augment shortfalls in the recurrent budget would be at variance with the Public Finance Management Act. The request was tabled on Wednesday before parliament, but consequent to UDC resistance, the matter was referred to the General Assembly [comprising all MPs] which met on Thursday morning for further discussion.

According to Dr Matsheka, at the General Assembly, it was concluded, through the guidance of Attorney General that the request to reallocate funds from the Development Fund to finance projected shortfall in the recurrent budget, as result of the salary adjustments approved after the 2019/2020 budget was concluded, was legal.

 “The opinion from the Attorney General proffered this morning [Thursday] at the General Assembly was that, indeed, the request by my Ministry was legal in terms of the supreme law of this country, which is the Constitution,” Matsheka told parliament when withdrawing the request. Dr Matsheka eventually agreed to withdraw the request in favour of a more agreeable approach.

It has emerged that while Public Finance Management Act forbids what the Minister of Finance proposed before parliament, the ruling party tried to find their way through the constitution, as they believed it is the “supreme law”, enough to relegate the Public Finance Management Act to a mere provision. However, the UDC court action threats were alive, and BDP feared the matter could enter the public domain and cause a stir should the opposition MPs challenge it in court.

WeekendPost also established that, a number of BDP legislators also opposed the request. One MP who opposed the motion from the floor on Wednesday, in presence of President Mokgweetsi Masisi, was Reggie Reatile, the Jwaneng-Mabutsane representative. Prior to reaching parliament, the request was first put before the Finance and Estimates Committee, Chaired by Kanye North lawmaker, Thapelo Letsholo.

Despite the Committee raising concerns with the request, it gave the proposal thumbs up. The committee comprises of Letsholo, Tshekedi Khama (Serowe West), Ignatius Moswaane (Francistown West), Tumisang Healy (Gaborone Central), Wynter Mmolotsi (Francistown South), Dr Kesetegile Gobotswang (Sefhare-Ramokgonami), Liakat Kablay (Letlhakeng-Lephephe), and Oarabile Regoeng (Molepolole North).

The Committee indicated its concern “over diversion of funds allocated to the development projects to finance the recurrent budget.” During his proposal, Dr Matsheka contented that the shortfall in the recurrent budget was an emergence, while the opposition were of the view that the decision to increase salaries in the absence of funds was for political expediency.

“Presidential Directive CAB.1/99 stipulates that only Supplementary Budget requests that arose from emergencies or were not foreseen qualify under this dispensation. Government took a decision to award salary and allowances increases to public servants after the budget process for financial year 2019/2020 was concluded,” Matsheka argued.

INCREMENT OF PUBLIC SERVANT SALARIES WAS NOT BUDGETED FOR  

During the past few months, Government made several commitments, including salary increment for two consecutive financial years as well as adjustment of salaries for public servants within security forces; namely Botswana Defence Force (BDF), Botswana Police Service (BPS) and Botswana Prisons Service (BPS).

A total of four ministries namely: Presidential Affairs, Governance and Public Administration; Basic Education; Local Government and Rural Development; and Defence, Justice and Security, had submitted Supplementary Budget requests to be funded from the Consolidated Fund. The Ministry of Presidential Affairs, Governance and Public Administration requested an additional funds amounting to P12,447,940. The request was to cater for the shortfall arising from adjustment of salaries for public officers for financial year 2019/2020 under the Directorate on Intelligence and Security (DIS).

The salary adjustments of 10 percent, 6 percent and 4 percent, for salary scales A and B; C and D; and E and above, respectively, were announced by Government in March 2019, after the budget for 2019/2020 financial year had been concluded. The salary adjustments were implemented with effect from 1st April, 2019.

The Ministry of Basic Education required a total supplementary funding of P71,234,580. Of this amount, a sum of P60,869,290 was needed to augment the shortfall under the Basic Salary and Allowances accounts at Headquarters, the Department of Out of School Education and Training and the Department of Teaching Service Management. The salaries and allowances accounts need additional funding following Government’s decision to award salary adjustments of 10 percent, 6 percent and 4 percent for various salary 8 grades effective from April 2019.

The remainder of P10,365,290 was intended to cover the shortfall in the Temporary Teachers account of the Department of Secondary Education. The Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development requested additional funding of P260,014,920 comprising P122,517,050 for Revenue Support Grant (RSG) to Councils and P137,497,870 for Social Protection Allowances. Under the RSG, the shortage is caused by increases to staff salaries, allowances and pension contributions, which were affected by the 10 percent, 6 percent and 4 percent salary adjustments.

Councillors’ salaries, termination allowances and other allowances have been increased by various amounts whilst the Ward/Village/Umbrella Development Committees’ allowances were increased by P50 per beneficiary per month. In regard to social protection allowances namely; Destitute Allowance, Disability Allowance and Old Age Pension Scheme, the increases were P50 per beneficiary per month for the first two (2) allowances and P100 per beneficiary per month for Old Age Pension Scheme.

The increases were also announced after the budget for 2019/2020 had been concluded. The Ministry of Defence, Justice and Security requires a total sum of P757,402,760 for Basic Salary and Allowances for three of its departments. These are Botswana Defence Force at P248,353,120; Botswana Police Service at P430,508,030; and Prisons and Rehabilitation for P78,541,610. The additional provision was intended to cover the shortfall caused by the 10 percent, 6 percent and 4 percent salary adjustments, which took effect on 1 st April 2019.

SEVERAL PROJECTS FACED SACRIFICE

In order to mitigate against the crisis, cabinet tried to sacrifice certain projects, which were perceived to be not on time. “Given the increasingly constrained fiscal space, my Ministry has assessed and identified areas of possible savings from slow spending projects funded under the Development Fund to finance the Consolidated Fund Supplementary Estimates requests. “I am proposing reallocations from the 2019/2020 Development Budget of the Ministry of Land Management, Water and Sanitation Services (MLWS).

“In this connection the sum of P1,101,100,200 comprising P800,000,000; P200,000,000 and P101,100,200 from the Water Supply Pipelines; Water Supply and Sanitation Networks; and the Land Development projects respectively, is proposed for reallocation. “These are slow spending projects that are still left with sizeable unspent balances. This proposed reallocation will not have any adverse effect on the annual 10 budgets of the projects concerned nor on the Total Estimated Cost,” Matsheka told parliament.

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BODANSA strikes gold with a handsome P45K windfall from Turnstar Holdings

27th February 2024

The Botswana DanceSport Association (BODANSA) has been graced with a financial boon of P45,000 courtesy of Turnstar Holdings. This generous endowment is earmarked for the illustrious Botswana International Dance Sport Grand Prix Championships, which are scheduled to animate Gaborone from Friday to Saturday.

At a media engagement held early today, BODANSA’s Marketing Maestro, Tiro Ntwayagae, shared that Turnstar Holdings Limited has bestowed a gift of P45,000 towards the grand spectacle.

“We are thrilled to announce that this backing will enable us to orchestrate a cultural soirée at the Game City Marque locale, a night brimming with cultural fervor set for March 1, 2024, from 6pm to the stroke of midnight.

This enchanting space will also serve as the battleground for the preliminaries of traditional dance ensembles—spanning the rhythmically rich Setapa to the euphoric beats of Sebirwa, the spirited Seperu, the heavenly Hosana, and more—in a competition folded into the Traditional Dance Groups Category. The ensemble that dances into the judges’ hearts will clinch a grand prize of P10,000,” elaborated Ntwayagae.

He further illuminated that the cultural eve would not only celebrate traditional melodies but also the fresh beats of contemporary dance variants including Hip Hop, Sbujwa, Amapiano, among others, in a dazzling display of modern dance mastery.

Moreover, these championships carry the prestigious recognition by the World DanceSport Federation as a qualifying round for the Breakdance category for the Paris 2024 Olympics. “This is a monumental opportunity for athletes to leap towards their Olympic dreams during one of the penultimate qualifiers,” underscored Ntwayagae.

Looking ahead to March 2, 2024, the festivities will propel into the University of Botswana Indoor Sports Arena for the championship’s climactic showdowns encompassing Breakdance, Latin, and Ballroom Dancing.

 

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Government of Botswana yet to sign, ratify the UN-CRPD

26th February 2024

In Botswana, a beacon of democracy in Africa, the right to participate in the political discourse is a cornerstone of its societal structure. It’s an avenue through which citizens shape the rules and systems that govern their everyday lives. Despite this, recent studies indicate that Individuals with Disabilities (IWDs) are notably absent from political dialogues and face substantial hurdles in exercising their democratic freedoms.

Research within the nation has uncovered that IWDs encounter difficulties in engaging fully with the political process, with a pronounced gap in activities beyond mere voting. The call for environments that are both accessible and welcoming to IWDs is loud, with one participant, who has a physical disability, spotlighting the absence of ramps at voting venues and the dire need for enhanced support to facilitate equitable involvement in the electoral process.

The challenges highlighted by the study participants pinpoint the structural and social obstacles that deter IWDs from participating wholly in democracy. The inaccessibility of voting facilities and the lack of special accommodations for people with disabilities are critical barriers. Those with more significant or intellectual disabilities face even steeper challenges, often feeling marginalized and detached from political engagement.

To surmount these obstacles, there is an urgent appeal for Botswana to stride towards more inclusive and accessible political stages for IWDs. This necessitates a committed effort from both the government and relevant entities to enforce laws and policies that protect the rights of IWDs to partake in the political framework. Enhancing awareness and understanding of the political landscape among IWDs, alongside integrating inclusive practices within political entities and governmental bodies, is crucial.

By dismantling these barriers and nurturing an inclusive political environment, Botswana can live up to its democratic ideals, ensuring every citizen, regardless of ability, can have a substantive stake in the country’s political future.

 

 

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People with Disabilities Face Barriers to Political Participation in Botswana

23rd February 2024

Individuals challenged by disabilities encounter formidable obstacles when endeavoring to partake in political processes within the context of Botswana. Political involvement, a cornerstone of democratic governance, empowers citizens to shape the legislative landscape that impacts their daily existence. Despite Botswana’s reputation for upholding democratic ideals, recent insights unveil a troubling reality – those with disabilities find themselves marginalized in the realm of politics, contending with substantial barriers obstructing the exercise of their democratic liberties.

A recent inquiry in Botswana unveiled a panorama where individuals with disabilities confront hurdles in navigating the political arena, their involvement often restricted to the basic act of voting. Voices emerged from the study, underscoring the critical necessity of fostering environments that are accessible and welcoming, affording individuals with disabilities the active engagement they rightfully deserve in political processes. Noteworthy was the account of a participant grappling with physical impairments, shedding light on the glaring absence of ramps at polling stations and the urgent call for enhanced support mechanisms to ensure an equitable electoral participation.

The echoes reverberating from these narratives serve as poignant reminders of the entrenched obstacles impeding the full integration of individuals with disabilities into the democratic tapestry. The inaccessibility of polling stations and the glaring absence of provisions tailored to the needs of persons with disabilities loom large as formidable barricades to their political engagement. Particularly pronounced is the plight of those grappling with severe impairments and intellectual challenges, who face even steeper hurdles in seizing political participation opportunities, often grappling with feelings of isolation and exclusion from the political discourse.

Calls for decisive action cascade forth, urging the establishment of more inclusive and accessible political ecosystems that embrace individuals with disabilities in Botswana. Government bodies and concerned stakeholders are urged to prioritize the enactment of laws and policies designed to safeguard the political rights of individuals with disabilities. Furthermore, initiatives geared towards enhancing awareness and education on political processes and rights for this segment of society must be spearheaded, alongside the adoption of inclusive measures within political institutions and party structures.

By dismantling these barriers and nurturing a political landscape that is truly inclusive, Botswana can earnestly uphold its democratic ethos and afford every citizen, including those with disabilities, a substantive opportunity to partake in the political fabric of the nation.

 

 

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