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Masisi maintains high rank in World Corruption Index

Publishing Date : 11 February, 2019

Author : UTLWANANG GASENNELWE

Botswana has maintained its position this week in the World Corruption Index released, under the leadership of incumbent President Dr. Mokgweetsi Masisi.

The annual report, which is published by Transparence International highlights that Angola, Nigeria, Botswana (under Masisi), South Africa and Kenya were all important countries to watch, given some promising political developments in which leadership was exchanged.


It states that “the real test will be whether these new administrations will follow through on their anti-corruption commitments moving forward.” This year’s rating results were released amidst intensive campaign by the Masisi led government against corruption, money laundering and crime in which big fishes were arrested or raided in connection to tax evasion like former Directorate of Intelligence Security Services (DISS) Director General Isaac Kgosi, Pastor Shadrack Baaitse and Leader of Opposition Duma Boko.


According to the latest Transparency International corruption index, Botswana has kept its score of 61 for two consecutive years of both 2017 and 2018, while interchanging the top spot in Africa with Seychelles. “Seychelles scores 66 out of 100, to put it at the top of the region. Seychelles is followed by Botswana and Cabo Verde, with scores of 61 and 57 respectively,” states Transparency International on this year’s Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) which generally presents a largely gloomy picture for Africa with exceptions of few countries like Botswana.  


The ranking comes after Botswana scored 61 points also in 2017 with Seychelles on the other hand scoring 60 in the process both doing better than Spain which is in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) at 57. “Specifically, Botswana, Seychelles, Cabo Verde, Rwanda and Namibia all score better on the index compared to some OECD countries like Italy, Greece and Hungary,” the corruption world research institute points out.  


Transparency International further on to emphasise that nations like Seychelles and Botswana, which score higher on the CPI than other countries in the region - have a few attributes in common. “Both have relatively well-functioning democratic and governance systems, which help contribute to their scores. However, these countries are the exception rather than the norm in a region where most democratic principles are at risk and corruption is high,” it states.


It further emphasises that the key ingredient that the top performing African countries have in common is political leadership that is consistently committed to anti-corruption.  The corruption insight organisation adds that while the majority of countries already have anti-corruption laws and institutions in place, these leading countries go an extra step to ensure implementation.


In 2017 the annual corruption index illustrated that, “from President Paul Kagame’s strict enforcement of compliance with the leadership code in Rwanda, to President Jorge Fonseca’s open promotion of institutional transparency in Cabo Verde or President Ian Khama’s innovative approach of ‘mainstreaming anti-corruption’ across ministries in Botswana, these countries learned what works best in their communities and pursued these tactics with commitment. These countries score 55, 55 and 61 respectively on the CPI.”


In 2018’s findings released this year Transparency International stated that only a handful eight of 49 countries, including Botswana, has scored more than 43 out of 100 on the index despite commitments from African leaders in declaring 2018 as the African Year of Anti-Corruption - but this has yet to translate into concrete progress. The latest world corruption agency results this year however still insists that Sub-Saharan Africa remains static as a region of stark political and socio-economic contrasts and many longstanding challenges.


“While a large number of countries have adopted democratic principles of governance, several are still governed by authoritarian and semi-authoritarian leaders. Autocratic regimes, civil strife, weak institutions and unresponsive political systems continue to undermine anti-corruption efforts,” said the reports. Transparency International is a global movement with one vision: a world in which government, business, civil society and the daily lives of people are free of corruption.


Through more than 100 chapters worldwide and an international secretariat in Berlin, Transparency International are leading the fight against corruption to turn this vision into reality. Since its inception in 1995, the Corruption Perceptions Index, Transparency International’s flagship research product, has become the leading global indicator of public sector corruption. The index offers an annual snapshot of the relative degree of corruption by ranking countries and territories from all over the globe.


 In 2012, Transparency International revised the methodology used to construct the index to allow for comparison of scores from one year to the next. The 2018 CPI draws on 13 surveys and expert assessments to measure public sector corruption in 180 countries and territories.
The index, which ranks 180 countries and territories by their perceived levels of public sector corruption according to experts and businesspeople, uses a scale of 0 to 100, where 0 is highly corrupt and 100 is very clean. More than two-thirds of countries score below 50 on this year’s CPI, with an average score of just 43.  


It reveals that the continued failure of most countries to significantly control corruption is contributing to a crisis in democracy around the world. While there are exceptions, the data shows that despite some progress, most countries are failing to make serious inroads against corruption.

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