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Home » News » General » PPADB to ‘tip the scales’ in favour of CEDA funded projects

PPADB to ‘tip the scales’ in favour of CEDA funded projects

Publishing Date : 30 October, 2017

Author : ALFRED MASOKOLA

The Public Procurement and Assets Disposal Board (PPADB) has engaged government on the possibility of devising a procurement strategy that will help jerk up businesses that were funded and monitored by the Citizen Entrepreneurial Development Agency (CEDA) and mentored by the Local Enterprise Authority (LEA).


PPADB Executive Chairperson, Bridget Poppy-John has this week revealed that PPADB is at early discussion stage with the relevant stakeholders to strike the collaboration that will uplift small businesses through some form of preferential procurement.
“We believe that micro procurement can be deliberately channelled to benefit small start-up enterprises as it requires no rigorous formalities although such support needs to be structured in an acceptable manner for accountability purposes,” said Poppy-John at a capacity building workshop organised for District Administration Tender Committees (DATCs).


“As PPADB we have identified the need for an end to end process through possible collaboration with institutions such as LEA and CEDA to find ways of supporting businesses that have been assisted with mentoring and funding, through public procurement, provided they meet the requirements of the tender.” The primary mandate of PPADB is to adjudicate and award tenders for Central Government and any other quasi-government institutions for the delivery of works, services and supplies related services. This is coupled with the registration and grading of contractors who so wish to do business with government.


CEDA was established by government in 2001 as response to a recommendation made by the National Conference on Citizen Economic Empowerment (NCCEE) held in 1999, in order to introduce the professional management of the Government financial assistance initiatives and to streamline the numerous projects providing similar schemes. Its core mandate is to provide financial and technical support for business development with a view to promote viable and sustainable citizen owned business enterprises.


Meanwhile LEA, which was established in 2004, was given the mandate of entrepreneurship and enterprise development in Botswana. Part of its responsibilities include providing business development services among others through; screening, business plan facilitation, training and mentoring; Identifying business opportunities for existing and future SMMEs; Promoting domestic and international linkages, especially between SMMEs and government, large business entities and other SMMEs.


Like in any developing country, the government continues to be the main player and the biggest provider of business to the private sector. Government expenditure through public procurement activities represents about 70% of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) making it (public procurement) an integral part of the economy. Unlike in developed countries where public procurement accounts to a less percentage of up to 20 percent in GDP, developing countries expect efficient public procurement for the purpose of transforming their growing economies.


PPADB has a partnership with the OECD which supports governments in reforming their public procurement systems to ensure cost savings and better service delivery. The OECD promotes efficient and effective public procurement systems because it considers public procurement the backbone of a well-functioning government that ensures delivery of quality services to the public. PPADB is also looking forward to reviewing financial thresholds of Ministerial Tender Committees (MTC) and District Administration Tender Committees (DATC) in the coming 2018/19 financial year.


Currently MTCs and DATCs deal with procurement of goods, services and works which are below P300 million in value. The MTC financial ceiling range from P25 million to P300 million while ceilings for DATCs range from P2 million to P10 million. “The intent is to increasingly devolve authority to Ministries and Districts for improved procurement performance. Challenges that come with the devolved mandate need to be acknowledged and addressed for improved procurement performance,” she said. Poppy-John said procuring entities should embrace sound procurement practises to deliver on their core functions because procurement can no longer be treated as a menial standalone task that is not a priority for those in leadership.


“It should be recognised as a strategic function that can save Ministries and Districts funds, and drive efficiencies, if well executed. Permanent Secretary in the ministry of Presidential Affairs, Governance and Public Administration Kebonye Moepeng indicated that public procurement is faced with shortage of personnel which has compromised service and quality delivery.


“Let us also recognise that we should all be alive to the need for improved and timely service delivery. Procurement as an enabler for service delivery by government at District level should therefore be expedited where possible, that is without breaking any rules,” she said. “Districts should plan their procurement and adhere to such plans to avoid situations where institutions go without supplies such as food, maintenance e.t.c.”

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