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Home » News » General » Tawana rejects Ntlo Ya Dikgosi again

Tawana rejects Ntlo Ya Dikgosi again

Publishing Date : 18 September, 2017

Author : ALFRED MASOKOLA

Batawana Chief, Kgosi Tawana Moremi II has vowed to never return to Ntlo Ya Dikgosi (NYD) as long as chieftaincy remains under the authority of Ministry of Local Government.


Moremi has reiterated that he will not contest for the 2019 general elections following his resignation from coalition Umbrella for Democratic Change (UDC). A candid talker, Moremi does not hide his resentment for the current practice which places Dikgosi under the authority of Local Government. “With bogosi nothing has changed, I still have a problem with being under the authority of local government,” he said when quizzed about the possibility of returning to Ntlo Ya Dikgosi. Currently the Batawana chieftainship is under the regency of Kealetile Moremi, the sister to Kgosi Tawana Moremi II.


His view on chiefs being subjected to the authority of Local Government is in line with that of Bakgatla chief Kgosi Kgafela Kgafela.  Kgosi Kgafela had a fall-out with government over wide ranging issues regarding chieftainship which ultimately led to his de-recognition by then Minister of Local Government Lebonaamang Mokalake. Kgosi Tawana, currently a member of parliament for Maun West said when he left Ntlo Ya Dikgosi almost a decade ago, he had a problem with it being unable to solve most of the problems faced by his tribesmen. He had thought being a legislator would provide a better platform to address the problems.


As a result of pressure from the tribe in 2003, Kgosi Tawana Moremi applied to participate in the BDP primary elections, but his name was vetted out. The then A-Team controlled central committee fighting ‘Khama’s battles’ refused to allow Kgosi Tawana, who belonged to a rival Barataphathi faction, to participate in the primary elections because he had previously publicly criticised then Vice President, Ian Khama. He would however get his way in the 2008 elections, beating Ronald Ridge in the primary elections before winning general elections.   
But parliament and politics have proved not to be as enterprising as he had thought, eventually leading to him announcing earlier this year that he will not seek re-election in the upcoming general elections.  


Kgosi Tawana’s stay in politics saw him defecting from ruling Botswana Democratic Party (BDP) to its splinter party, Botswana Movement for Democracy (BMD) in 2011 and later contesting the 2014 general elections under the Umbrella for Democratic Change (UDC) banner.
From there, Moremi shared that he would be focusing more on tourism to ensure that the community benefits from the tourism rich area. An avid believer in tourism, he spends most of his time researching on tourism. Kgosi Tawana has an ongoing battle with government over the ownership of Moremi Game reserve.


Batawana royals through an anticipated court battle want to fight the 1979 presidential directive which ordered Moremi Game Reserve to be transferred from the community to the government. Moremi Game Reserve which was established in 1963 by Batawana was reassigned to government to take care of its administration and management in 1979. However, a bitter debate has erupted in recent years between government and Batawana royals with regard to the ownership of the game reserve.


The tribe now seeks to compel government through court to produce records showing an agreement reached by the two parties in transferring the ownership of the game reserve. Although not yet before the court the tribe has already engaged lawyers on the matter with a view of seeking justice from the courts of law, with their evidence in records format protected and secured in all corners of the globe. In 2016 Kgosi Tawana revealed to this publication that his bid to return the game reserve to the hands of the people was a target of ruling party propaganda.


“During a rally which was addressed in Maun in the run up to elections, I was described as a poor chief who wanted to use the game reserve to enrich himself,” he said.  “But later on people understood what we are trying to achieve and more people are starting to support our resolve.” The Batawana Chief also highlighted that after an unenviable period, the tribe has managed to raise finances enough to fund the court case. “There has been pressure from the media and the community to take the matter to court but we do not want to rush the case lest we lose it [case] on small technicalities,” he said.


Government has in the past consistently refused to produce records showing the agreement it reached with the community over transferring natural resources rights. “It is outright unlawful for government as the trustee of records to conceal the agreements,” he argued. It was reported in the last few years that Moremi Game Reserve was generating about P60 million annually, an amount which could be vital for the community’s empowerment according to the Batawana Chief.


“There are different models we can use to generate income and empower the community through affirmative action measures that will ensure that the community becomes part of the value chain in terms of business operations of the game reserve,” he contended.Tawana said the current arrangement does not benefit locals since they are not part of the supply chain and people and companies who are often contracted to do business in Moremi Game Reserve are not from the North West.

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