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The Flood Breaks Forth

Publishing Date : 15 May, 2017

Benson C Saili
THIS EARTH, MY BROTHER  
   



“My creatures have filled the rivers like dragonflies” – Ninmah, Enki’s partner in the creation of Adam


Why did Noah build such a humongous maritime vessel that was the size of a stadium? If you are to take Genesis on its word,  the raison d’être was to have ample room to accommodate a pair  of every creature that existed with a view to perpetuate the species after the flood, which was  reckoned to be on such a scale as to destroy  virtually every inkling of life.  Certainly, estimates of the carrying capacity of the so-called ark – which in truth was a submarine – range from 70,000 to 120,000 animals of the size of a full-grown sheep.


The Sumerian records, which predated Genesis by 2500 years, do attest to creatures being on board the ark but they were in the form of DNA, not in fully-formed physicality. Enki, Ninmah, and Ningishzidda had seen to it that they were packaged in such a way. The notion, therefore, that the ark was designed with a view to accommodate scores of thousands of the animal family just does not wash. So why did Enki conceive of such a colossal submersible vessel?


Once again, the answer can easily be gleaned from the Sumerian records. Enki had anticipated that all the people who would help in the construction of the ark plus their family and friends might opt to come aboard when it was complete. We’re talking in the region of roughly 10,000 people given that Shuruppak was a cult centre and therefore must have been quite populous. Sadly, only a fraction of the craftsmen and their families chose to embark. “Any who to the abode of the lord Enki (Africa) wish to go, let them too aboard come,” Noah appealed to the hundreds of craftsmen who had assisted in the construction effort.


It is part of human nature to dread the unknown and so the overwhelming majority politely declined. Instead, they misguidedly looked forward to a new era of abundance that would be ushered in by Enlil once Noah had set sail for Africa.   All they did was help ensure Noah and his family were well-catered to: they donated whatever provisions they could spare to get him to enjoy a hassle-free voyage. “Eager to see Ziusudra (Noah) depart, the townspeople to the boat food and water brought,” Enki relates in Zechariah Sitchin’s The Lost Book of Enki. “From their own mouths sustenance they took; to appease Enlil they were in a hurry! Four-legged animals into the boat were also driven, birds from the field by themselves flew in.”


Enlil, who as yet wasn’t aware Noah was Enki’s son nor that it was Enki who had come up with the idea of a salvavic water-borne vessel, watched indifferently as the ark took shape and as it readied for departure. His carefree attitude stemmed  from his sadistic belief that the ark would capsize and all its  inhabitants would drown in the raging flood.  

ANUNNAKI PREPARE FOR TAKE-OFF

As the countdown to the onset of the Deluge began, Enlil assembled all the Anunnaki at Sippar, the spaceport,  to administer to them dispersal instructions. Those destined for planet Nibiru, the rank-and-file Anunnaki,  were the first to be briefed. The “celestial boats” (space vehicles) were assigned to them and soon they made their way aboard amid tears of nostalgia and other such sentimental outpourings.    


Next were Marduk, the Nefilim (the Igigi who had settled on Earth), and the Anakim (the offspring of the Nefilim and Earthling women). Marduk put it to Enlil that these were his people and he would give them his own dispersal instructions. He accordingly had them airlifted to Mount Hermon, the landing place (airport) in modern-day Lebanon. There,  he offered them two choices: either they came with him to Mars or they sought citadel in “distant mountainlands”. Only a few decided to accompany him to Mars: most opted to ride out the Flood right here on Earth as they had fallen in love with the breathtakingly beautiful planet as opposed to the dreary Mars.


The last to be briefed by Enlil were members of his own clan, who included Enki’s second-born son Nergal, who was married to Enlil’s daughter Ereshkigal. Ninurta, Enlil’s firstborn, was assigned to the “mountainlands beyond the oceans” (the Americas) to report on “rumblings”, or earth tremors,  if at all. Nergal and Ereshkigal, the meteorological experts, were  to keep vigil over Antarctica and alert Enlil on the slightest indication that the Antarctic Ice Sheet was slipping into the sea. Ishkur-Adad, Enlil’s youngest  son, was to see to it that Earthlings did not besiege the spaceport as the Anunnaki space vehicles prepared to roar aloft into the inky space. 

 

Utu-Shamash, Enlil’s grandson and the Anunnaki’s lead pilot who was also in charge of the spaceport at Sippar, was to be at the controls of the rocket in which Enlil would head into orbit. The rocket would blast off whilst “showering down a rain of eruptions” as a ceremonial farewell to the planet whose future viability was uncertain in the face of the upcoming Deluge.


Meanwhile, the Nefilim and the Anakim had at the urging of Enki and Marduk spread word amongst the Earthlings  in their community that they relocate to higher ground without spelling out the specifics. In the 2012 book Lost Civilizations & Secrets of the Past, P Von Ward writes that,  “The Snohomish of the Pacific Northwest say ETs (the Anunnaki)  warned their ancestors to ride the coming tide to the mountaintops. More than 500 similar ‘legends’ have been identified worldwide, warning to prepare for survival after a widespread flood.”


On his part, Enki personally took the trouble to inform Noah as to when he should give instructions to set the ark in motion. "When Shamash who orders a trembling at dusk will shower down a rain of eruptions,  board thou the ship, button up the entrance!" Given that the royal rocket would launch at dusk and Shuruppak, where Noah was based,  was only 180 km south of Sippar, the “rain of eruptions” spewing forth from the Shamash rocket would be more than amply visible to Noah and his submarine crew.  

THE DELUGE IS ON

Finally, the die was cast. “For nights before the calamity struck, in the heavens Nibiru as a glowing star was seen,” relates Enki.  “Then there was darkness in daytime, and at night the Moon as though by a monster was swallowed. The Earth began to shake, by a netforce (gravity)  before unknown it was agitated. Then the sound of a rolling thunder boomed, lightnings the skies lit up. Depart! Depart! Utu to the Anunnaki gave the signal ...  The Anunnaki lifted up, their rocketships, like torches, setting the land ablaze with their glare ...

Crouched in the boats of heaven (rockets), the Anunnaki heavenward were lofted ... In Shuruppak, eighteen leagues away (180 km), the bright eruptions by Ninagal were seen.” The Deluge was in progress. The moment he saw the signal by Shamash, Ninagal, Enki’s fifth-born son with his wife Ninki, rushed to get aboard Noah’s ark.

 

Known as “Lord of the Great Waters”, that is, the seas, he was the Anunnaki’s greatest navigator and superintended over the shipping of ores from the Abzu (Africa)  to the Edin in Sumeria. He was to be the lead pilot of the ark.  Ninagal brought with him a “cedarwood box of the life essences and life eggs of living creatures”.  This was simply a cryogenic tank in which the DNA of animals and even medicinal herbs were kept.


Noah’s children and their wives, his relations and a few hundred craftsmen along with their broader families, embarked too. Altogether, the number of humans on the ark must have been at least a thousand, and not only Noah and his nuclear family unit as Genesis wrongly suggests.   Noah was the very last to come board. He was restless, anxious both for his own fate in case something went wrong and the ark  broke apart and for that of the rest of mankind who were certain to perish in the great inundation.  Says the Sumerian chronicles:  "He was in and out (of the ark):  he could not sit, could not crouch ... His heart was broken: he was vomiting gall.”


The airborne Anunnaki themselves were far from calm and composed. Says Enki: “Though they were prepared for the Deluge, its coming was a frightening experience: the noise of the Deluge set the gods trembling.” The rage of the Deluge is described in bone-chilling detail in the Sumerian texts. Below is one such snippet:


“On that day, on that unforgettable day, the Deluge with a roar began.  In the Whiteland (Antarctica), at the Earth's bottom, the Earth's foundations were shaking. Then with a roar to a thousand thunders equal, off its foundations the Ice Sheet slipped: by Nibiru's unseen netforce it was pulled away, into the south sea crashing. One sheet of ice into another Ice Sheet was smashing, the Whiteland's surface like a broken eggshell was crumbling. All at once,  a tidal wave arose, the very skies was the wall of waters reaching.

 

A storm, its ferocity never before seen, at the Earth's bottom began to howl: its winds the wall of water were driving, the tidal wave northward was spreading.  Northward was the wall of waters onrushing, the Abzu lands it was reaching. Therefrom toward the settled lands it travelled, the Edin it overwhelmed. When the tidal wave, the wall of waters, Shuruppak reached, the boat of Ziusudra the tidal wave from its moorings lifted, tossed it about:  like a watery abyss the boat it swallowed. Though completely submerged, the boat held firm, not a drop of water into it did enter. Outside the storm's wave the people overtook like a killing battle.”

ANUNNAKI WEEP AT CARNAGE OF WATERY ORDEAL

The Deluge had a much more harrowing psychological effect on the Anunnaki who were in orbit in several spacecraft than the humans who were riding in Noah’s submarine. The Anunnaki were watching the disaster in real time on satellite television in their spacecraft. With close-up satellite pictures, they were easily able to assess the extent of the tear-jerking destruction of both property and lives.  


Talking of tears, Ninmah, who had a direct role in the creation of mankind by way of genetic engineering, was inconsolable, with Inanna-Ishtar, Enlil’s granddaughter, no less so. Say the Sumerian texts: “The Mother Goddess herself, Ninhursag (Ninmah), was shocked by the utter devastation. She bewailed what she was seeing: the Goddess saw and she wept ... Her lips were covered with feverishness ... My creatures have become like flies, she mourned. They have filled the rivers like dragonflies, their fatherhood taken by the rolling sea."

Inanna “cried out like a woman in travail: the olden days are alas turned to clay,” she whimpered.  In his spacecraft, Enki turned off the live feed and buried his face into his hands, his tears as copious as the very floods that had swallowed up his own creation. Ninmah asked herself: why did she have to save her own life when mankind, who she had helped usher into existence, was being devoured by this molten inferno-like flood?


Enlil’s emotions are not documented but from the little that is said about his reaction, it seems he was more concerned about the damage wrought to Earth itself than to mankind as he had to begin life anew on the same wrecked planet. Meanwhile, the flood was on a roll. It was like the world had come to an end altogether and a brand new earth was in the offing.  “The Moon disappeared,” says the inscriptions on Sumerian cuneiform clay tablets. “The rains roared in the clouds; the winds became savage. The   Deluge set out, its might came upon the people like a battle ... It bellowed like a bull: the winds whinnied like a wild ass. The darkness was dense; the Sun could not be seen.”


All the while, Noah’s ark kept afloat, wholly intact: the furious flood had no deleterious effect upon it whatsoever. Why did it hold up amidst the tumultuous waters? Says one expert: “The interesting thing about Noah’s ark is that its construction was on a 1:6 ratio. Naval architecture reveals that this is the most stable ratio for an ocean-going vessel. It could have easily survived even big ocean waves and would be next to impossible to capsize.” The incomparable Enki deserves  plaudits for having mathematically taken such ramifications into account when he hunched over his desk to design the vessel.


Yet for all his brilliance, Enki had underestimated the duration of the inundation. It lasted not days or weeks but months. Because of this miscalculation, the Anunnaki had seriously undercut themselves in their rations. As such, when hunger hit, it did so with a vengeance, as if it was the price the Anunnaki had to pay for abandoning mankind to a most sudden and all-consuming demise. “The gods cowered like dogs ... The Anunnaki, great gods, were sitting in thirst, in hunger ... They sat weeping; crouching like sheep at a trough. Their lips were feverish of thirst, they were suffering cramp from hunger.”
 
NOAH OFFERS THANKSGIVING SACRIFICE TO ENKI AS DELUGE CONCLUDES

The Deluge was at the peak of its rage for five months. Thereafter, the waters began to recede. At that point, Noah instructed the submarine navigator Ninagal to set course for Mount Ararat in today’s Armenia. Mount Ararat was the highest altitude in that region. The vessel sailed for 2   months and 17 days before it came to rest on what Noah would come to term the “The Mountain of Salvation”.   As the waters continued to subside, other mountain peaks became visible on the “11th day of the 10th month” according to Sumerian records, that is, about three months later.


During the next 40 days, Noah continued to assess the situation from within the ark using dashboard instruments, assisted by past navigational master Ninagal.   Then he released a raven, a swallow and a dove to help signal whether the waters had diminished to ground level. During the first two days, the three birds returned “empty-handed”, which suggested the ground was still water-logged and the vegetation was still submerged.

 

But on the third day, the dove returned with an olive twig clipped in its mouth – a sign that the world was almost wholly habitable, that climatic peace was about fully restored. This is the origin of the English phrase “extend an Olive branch”, meaning offer terms of peace.  The next time Noah sent out the dove, it went for good. The Deluge was over.   


It was at this juncture that Noah disembarked from the ark. This was exactly one year and ten months since the Deluge began. “Opening the watertight hatch, from the boat Ziusudra emerged,” say the Sumerian records. “The sky was clear, the Sun was shining, a gentle wind was blowing. Hurriedly upon his spouse and children he to come out called.”


The first thing Noah decided to do was to pay tribute to Enki, who alone had made it possible for all who were in the ark to survive the Deluge. “The lord Enki let us praise,” he said. “To him thanks give!” Then reinforced by his sons, he gathered rocks and built an altar. “A fire on the altar he lit, with aromatic incense he made a fire. A ewe-lamb, one without blemish, for a sacrifice he selected. And upon the altar to Enki the ewe-Iamb as a sacrifice he offered.”


Meanwhile, the Anunnaki could not contemplate the totality of the destruction. It was horrendous and unconscionable. Writes Zechariah Sitchin:  “The Deluge had ‘swept over’, and an effort of 120 shars (432,000 years) was wiped away overnight. The south African mines, the cities in Mesopotamia, the control centre at Nippur, the spaceport at Sippar – all lay buried under water and mud. Hovering in their shuttlecraft above devastated Earth, the Anunnaki pantheon impatiently awaited the abatement of the waters so that they could set foot again on solid ground. How were they going to survive henceforth on Earth when their cities and facilities were gone, and even their manpower – Mankind – was totally destroyed?”


NEXT WEEK: EXACTLY  WHOSE WRATH WAS THE DELUGE?

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